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I always want to enter movies which feature appealing dens of iniquity, like the opium den-ish joint in "The Letter". When Bette Davis enters that Oriental room with all the wind chimes pealing out sounds of warning, to meet up with Hammond's spooky wife [as played by Gale Sondergaard] the whole place just reeks of atmosphere. 

I feel a good den of iniquity should have some red light habituees, a roue or two, interesting lighting, and possibly Nazimova in full costume. Of course some here might have a more ruffian vision of what their favorite den of iniquity should resemble, and that's fine too if they would like to share.


There is actually a silent film called "Den of Iniquity" from 1925 with sets by Alfred Junge that I look forward to seeing sometime.

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Zaza Gabors Strip Joint in Touch Of Evil (1958)

Barbara Stanwyck's Storyville Doll House in Walk on the Wild Side (1962) 

Bennie's  Bennie's Tlaquepaque tourist bar/clip joint in Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia (1974) 

The Storyville Bordello in Pretty Baby (1978)

The opium den below the Chinese Theater in Once Upon A Time in America (1984)

Ben's dive w*h*o*r*e*house in Blue Velvet (1986)

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Old joke:

(Parents in the kitchen on Friday teen-night)

"What's with the arguments going on in the TV room?  Sounds like a den of iniquity in there!"
"Eh, that's just my kid and his friends trying to divide up a couple of pizzas--You're hearing the din of inequity."

:D

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The first thing that came to mind was Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967), where the girls were being taken from the seemingly legitimate boarding house to be sold into white slavery by the landlady and her Chinese henchmen. 

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Ya know what's a "den of iniquity"?! ANYPLACE where there's pool tables, THAT'S where!

Yeah, THAT'S right, "POOL"! And which starts with "P", which rhymes with "T", and which is the first letter in "Trouble"!!!

(...just ask the city fathers of River City...THEY'LL tell ya!)

 

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On 3/31/2019 at 2:07 AM, NickAndNora34 said:

The first thing that came to mind was Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967), where the girls were being taken from the seemingly legitimate boarding house to be sold into white slavery by the landlady and her Chinese henchmen. 

Absolutely there. I'm already hearing Mary Tyler Moore in the back of my head desperately saying into a telephone: "Operator, you don't know what it's like to be trapped in a Chinese opium den!"

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Harry Hope's Greenwich Village Saloon and Rooming House....'The Iceman Cometh' by Eugene O'Neill

("One of these days I'll take a stroll around the ward and say hello to all me old mates...")

iceman-cometh-march-ryan.jpg

John Frankenheimer 1973 movie: Lee Marvin, Fredric March, Robert Ryan, Jeff Bridges, Bradford Dillman,  Sorrell Booke, Moses Gunn, Clifton James

Sidney Lumet TV version:  Jason Robards,  Myron McCormick,  James Broderick,  Robert Redford,  Sorrell Booke

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On 3/30/2019 at 5:07 PM, Sgt_Markoff said:

'The Shanghai Gesture' is my favorite. A filthy pit where anything goes; a lowly sink where you can purchase anything ...even a human soul!

The_Shanghai_Gesture_orig_US_poster.jpg

Admirable choice, Sarge! There is a decided air of discontentment and unsavory activities inherent in this film. Love Ona Munson also in her full regalia. Thanks!

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On 3/30/2019 at 5:50 PM, cigarjoe said:

Zaza Gabors Strip Joint in Touch Of Evil (1958)

Barbara Stanwyck's Storyville Doll House in Walk on the Wild Side (1962) 

Bennie's  Bennie's Tlaquepaque tourist bar/clip joint in Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia (1974) 

The Storyville Bordello in Pretty Baby (1978)

The opium den below the Chinese Theater in Once Upon A Time in America (1984)

Ben's dive w*h*o*r*e*house in Blue Velvet (1986)

Seen'em all and love them all, CJ! Whoa, Nellie..."Blue Velvet" is just way out there and I also like the seedy atmosphere in Babs' brothel, but all your choices are winners. Thanks!

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On 3/30/2019 at 5:57 PM, TopBilled said:

Anne Baxter starts with just a few drinks...

screen-shot-2019-03-30-at-2.54.06-pm.jpe

...then ends up at an opium den in THE RAZOR'S EDGE (1946).

screen-shot-2019-03-30-at-2.55.06-pm.jpe

Yeah, that was a fast ride down the roller coaster, was it not, with Tierney smiling all the way watching the train wreck! Thanks, TB.

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On 3/30/2019 at 6:50 PM, lavenderblue19 said:

Kay Francis as Spot White in Warner Oland's nightclub/brothel in the film Mandalay. Love this film and Kay is gorgeous as she descends the staircase in that sequin gown. A very racey pre-code.

Love Kay also, Lavenderblue! She's so classy so when Kay gets near criminal activity it makes it all the more fun. Thanks!

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On 3/30/2019 at 8:50 PM, EricJ said:

Old joke:

(Parents in the kitchen on Friday teen-night)

"What's with the arguments going on in the TV room?  Sounds like a den of iniquity in there!"
"Eh, that's just my kid and his friends trying to divide up a couple of pizzas--You're hearing the din of inequity."

:D

-30-

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On 4/2/2019 at 6:36 AM, Sgt_Markoff said:

Harry Hope's Greenwich Village Saloon and Rooming House....'The Iceman Cometh' by Eugene O'Neill

("One of these days I'll take a stroll around the ward and say hello to all me old mates...")

iceman-cometh-march-ryan.jpg

John Frankenheimer 1973 movie: Lee Marvin, Fredric March, Robert Ryan, Jeff Bridges, Bradford Dillman,  Sorrell Booke, Moses Gunn, Clifton James

Sidney Lumet TV version:  Jason Robards,  Myron McCormick,  James Broderick,  Robert Redford,  Sorrell Booke

This was Fredric March's last film and also Robert Ryan's last film. Sorrell Booke has a memorable turn as a wild out-of-control drunk. Frankenheimer is faithful to the original material, but at 239 minutes (four hours) it's too long and parts of it are difficult to sit through. They easily could have edited out a few things. However, the idea was to present a filmed play instead of a more cinematic adaptation.

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On 4/1/2019 at 1:46 AM, Dargo said:

Ya know what's a "den of iniquity"?! ANYPLACE where there's pool tables, THAT'S where!

Yeah, THAT'S right, "POOL"! And which starts with "P", which rhymes with "T", and which is the first letter in "Trouble"!!!

(...just ask the city fathers of River City...THEY'LL tell ya!)

 

OMG, why is the idea of you at a pool table not a surprise, Dar?

Now I may not be as good as my cousin, Kristy, who could practice nightly on my Uncle's Victorian pool table, but I do know my way around some Eight Ball games, and can bank a few shots, as long as there is a Ladies Aid unit available occasionally.

Don't have a personal chalk holder anymore, but game on, if you wanna challenge me. I get skinnies!

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On 4/2/2019 at 9:36 AM, Sgt_Markoff said:

Harry Hope's Greenwich Village Saloon and Rooming House....'The Iceman Cometh' by Eugene O'Neill

("One of these days I'll take a stroll around the ward and say hello to all me old mates...")

iceman-cometh-march-ryan.jpg

John Frankenheimer 1973 movie: Lee Marvin, Fredric March, Robert Ryan, Jeff Bridges, Bradford Dillman,  Sorrell Booke, Moses Gunn, Clifton James

Sidney Lumet TV version:  Jason Robards,  Myron McCormick,  James Broderick,  Robert Redford,  Sorrell Booke

Funny you mention that as I was just thinking of buying the former on dvd the other day from a catalog. Thanks!

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3 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

The Pavilion strip joint on the Jersey Shore in the adaptation of Jim Thompson's The Kill Off (1989)

Ewwww...and I mean that in a good way! Nice call...

I've never seen that. Yikes, but I love anything by Jim Thompson. You do come up with the best stuff, CigarJoe. Thanks, I'll look for it.

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39 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Frankenheimer is faithful to the original material, but at 239 minutes (four hours) it's too long and parts of it are difficult to sit through. They easily could have edited out a few things. However, the idea was to present a filmed play instead of a more cinematic adaptation.

Actually (now that we're well off the original topic), that's because the 1973 version was one of the American Film Theater's production of early to mid-70's movie versions of classic plays:  https://www.imdb.com/search/title?companies=co0130370&sort=year,asc

Which, along the way, also gave us Maximilian Schell in "The Man in the Glass Booth", Topol in Bertold Brecht's "Galileo", and that weird version of Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder in "Rhinoceros", proving that Eugene Ionesco is pretty darn unfilmable.  They're all interesting from an academic standpoint, but yes, plays need a little judicious editing for screen.

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