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The Battleship Potemkin 1925?


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Suppose to be a good movie but only saw ~28 minutes before the screen went black with nothing more to be seen…anyone else?

Was it TCM or DirecTV the culprit?

Just wondering…

 

 

In the meantime, recently discovered a NEW rock band from Frankenmuth, Michigan called “GRETA VAN FLEET” – three brothers and a friend who are being touted as potentially the next Led Zeppelin with a young singer sounding much like Robert Plant. They don’t have an album yet, but here is a sample…check ‘em out. 💋

 

 

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The broadcast wasn't interrupted on my Brooklyn Cablevision setup.

Of course, I appreciate the restoration of this film toward its originally intended vision, including dividing it into its five conceived episodes, its digitally remastered image, its complete running time at "normal" speed of 75 minutes, and the reincorporation of a great recording of Edmund Meisel's original 1925 score, although Eisenstein had intended that a new score for his film be written every quarter-century, leading to one in 1950 by Nikolai Kruyukov, with numerous other scores known from 1985 thru 2017. But despite all that, the version of the film I first saw in the eighties long before any restoration occurred, was on a public domain VHS tape marketed by Video Yesteryear, and although it may be blasphemous to say so, the score that accompanied that battered 65-minute, slow- and fast-motion version is the one I will always view as authentic, such that I don't think people shown the restored version are getting the real experience that make it one of the greatest movies ever made. Yet I have never heard that score to which I am referring to again, not even on YouTube, and I don't even know who the composer is, and I'm unsure if it was before or after the Kruyukov version. But if I were a TCM guest programmer, I would want the channel to find and run that Video Yesteryear version at least once so people could see what I mean, and a lot of people left somewhat cold by the official version might get why on the world film critics' Sight & Sound "top ten greatest movies ever" poll that has taken place once each decade starting in 1952, probably viewing the version I am favoring for the first five times they conducted the poll, "Battleship Potemkin" was only one of three movies to make the list each decade since that time (the others being "Citizen Kane" and "Rules of the Game"), and why in my estimation it is surely one of the five greatest silent films.

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46 minutes ago, Defenestrator said:

The broadcast wasn't interrupted on my Brooklyn Cablevision setup.

Of course, I appreciate the restoration of this film toward its originally intended vision, including dividing it into its five conceived episodes, its digitally remastered image, its complete running time at "normal" speed of 75 minutes, and the reincorporation of a great recording of Edmund Meisel's original 1925 score, although Eisenstein had intended that a new score for his film be written every quarter-century, leading to one in 1950 by Nikolai Kruyukov, with numerous other scores known from 1985 thru 2017. But despite all that, the version of the film I first saw in the eighties long before any restoration occurred, was on a public domain VHS tape marketed by Video Yesteryear, and although it may be blasphemous to say so, the score that accompanied that battered 65-minute, slow- and fast-motion version is the one I will always view as authentic, such that I don't think people shown the restored version are getting the real experience that make it one of the greatest movies ever made. Yet I have never heard that score to which I am referring to again, not even on YouTube, and I don't even know who the composer is, and I'm unsure if it was before or after the Kruyukov version. But if I were a TCM guest programmer, I would want the channel to find and run that Video Yesteryear version at least once so people could see what I mean, and a lot of people left somewhat cold by the official version might get why on the world film critics' Sight & Sound "top ten greatest movies ever" poll that has taken place once each decade starting in 1952, probably viewing the version I am favoring for the first five times they conducted the poll, "Battleship Potemkin" was only one of three movies to make the list each decade since that time (the others being "Citizen Kane" and "Rules of the Game"), and why in my estimation it is surely one of the five greatest silent films.

 

The VHS version has an organ score by Rosa Rio.  You can order this cheaply on Ebay.

BWmb7w5.jpg

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I can't believe it. This YouTube clip DOES have the score I mean, but somewhat out of sequence from how it accompanied the action in the version I viewed regularly. It also lacks the intro with the titles that had the battleship cannons as a background illustration with the catchy tempo you hear in the early frames. The YouTube clip calls this the Kryukov score, but I had investigated clips so attributed before and found very different music. Note the titles at the start of this clip lists different musical writers for the restoration but doesn't list a score composer for the actual music.

Anyway, JeanneCrain, view this version and see if you agree why I think this score should be the one that is more regularly used on TCM, and if it raises your opinion of how the film should be regarded.

 

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56 minutes ago, DVDPhreak said:

Trivia question to all:

What do Battleship Potemkin (1925), The Untouchables (1987), and Beauty and the Beast (1991) have in common?

It just struck me. Both Battleship Potemkin and The Untouchables had the baby carriage at the top of the stairs threatening to fall. Too long since I've seen Beauty and the Beast. Did something similar happen then, or is it just the falling incident in the tower in the climax?

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46 minutes ago, Defenestrator said:

No, I'm not referring to an organ score, definitely full orchestra. They must have put a different version on your tape. Mine was from the early eighties.

You mentioned the VHS was made by Video Yesteryear, and that is what I found.  If it was actually put on VHS (under whatever label) you should be able to find it.  Some collectors never throw them away, and they can still be bought thanks to Ebay.

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29 minutes ago, Defenestrator said:

I can't believe it. This YouTube clip DOES have the score I mean, but somewhat out of sequence from how it accompanied the action in the version I viewed regularly. It also lacks the intro with the titles that had the battleship cannons as a background illustration with the catchy tempo you hear in the early frames. The YouTube clip calls this the Kryukov score, but I had investigated clips so attributed before and found very different music. Note the titles at the start of this clip lists different musical writers for the restoration but doesn't list a score composer for the actual music.

Anyway, JeanneCrain, view this version and see if you agree why I think this score should be the one that is more regularly used on TCM, and if it raises your opinion of how the film should be regarded.

 

 

This clip is from a DVD made in the UK by a company called Tartan.  Never trust Youtube as a source.  How do you know if the person who uploaded this clip was the one who screwed up the audio sync?  I've seen uploaders who flipped the picture left and right, cropped the picture, blurred the picture on purpose, altered the audio, and did all sorts of tempering to the video so that the it won't be removed for copyright violation.  If you want to verify this yourself, the only way is to get the DVD.  Here is a review of the DVD, with a link to where you can order it.

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21 minutes ago, Defenestrator said:

It just struck me. Both Battleship Potemkin and The Untouchables had the baby carriage at the top of the stairs threatening to fall. Too long since I've seen Beauty and the Beast. Did something similar happen then, or is it just the falling incident in the tower in the climax?

It indeed occurs at the castle scene, when the townspeople are attacked by the servants in the castle.  A split-second shot shows a baby carriage rolling down the stairs.

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I'm not claiming to take anything at face value from what the YouTube poster writes, and intend no copyright violation of course. I do have the special edition DVD of the same version TCM airs, but am dissatisfied with it as it doesn't contain the score in that YouTube clip that was the one I had gotten so used to in the eighties. According to this review you have included, the composer whose name had eluded me was Dimitri Shostakovich, but I had investigated that name before and couldn't find this music in clips with his name in it, so I'm not sure that review is referring to this score. Basically I feel I owe more to the YouTube guy in supplying that lost music than the possibly unrelated info in the review. I was just excited that this YouTube clip has the music I meant which was the important thing for me. If its composer could be confirmed by someone else, I would love if the restored visual film and complete opening titles could be accompanied by this score; that for me would be the best viewing experience of "Battleship Potemkin" which is my entire message.

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17 minutes ago, Defenestrator said:

I'm not claiming to take anything at face value from what the YouTube poster writes, and intend no copyright violation of course. I do have the special edition DVD of the same version TCM airs, but am dissatisfied with it as it doesn't contain the score in that YouTube clip that was the one I had gotten so used to in the eighties. According to this review you have included, the composer whose name had eluded me was Dimitri Shostakovich, but I had investigated that name before and couldn't find this music in clips with his name in it, so I'm not sure that review is referring to this score. Basically I feel I owe more to the YouTube guy in supplying that lost music than the possibly unrelated info in the review. I was just excited that this YouTube clip has the music I meant which was the important thing for me. If its composer could be confirmed by someone else, I would love if the restored visual film and complete opening titles could be accompanied by this score; that for me would be the best viewing experience of "Battleship Potemkin" which is my entire message.

The review reviews 3 DVD editions, and you need to look at the one with the Kryulov score, which is the DVD made by Tartan.  Let me point out the part of the review for this particular DVD:

"... Rather than trying to sync up the Nikolai Kryukov and Edmund Meisel scores to the feature, Palisades Tartan has included both versions as separate encodes from different prints. Although their quality is nowhere near that of the feature version, it is interesting to see these alternate versions. The Nikolai Kryukov score version is a battered Contemporary Films release print of the Mosfilm's sound version with Russian narration, some sound effects, and English subtitles on the print (for the narration and the Russian intertitles, the opening credits are in English). The Kryukov version also lacks chapter title cards and one possibly contentious dialogue intertitle. ..."

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9 hours ago, DVDPhreak said:

Trivia question to all:

What do Battleship Potemkin (1925), The Untouchables (1987), and Beauty and the Beast (1991) have in common?

Well if it's the 2017 "Beauty and the Beast" they're all airing the week of March 31 - April 6 ...

Here are the feature and TV films airing the week of March 31 - April 6, 2019

https://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-tv-movies-htmlstory.

 

If it's the 1946 version "Beauty and the Beast", they're...

Samuel Stoddard's 300 Essential Films, 1915-2008

http://www.rinkworks.com/checklist/list.cgi?u=khrockey&U=sam&p=stoddard

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I could not help but feel, while watching POTEMKIN, that there exists the potential for a musical/comedy adaptation  called BLAME IT ON THE BORSCHT.

Because really, when you get down to it- that's what the whole problem was. Bad meat and beets.

A few dozen crabpots and some trawling nets also could've saved so many lives.....

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A joke that we used preceding a meal in my house, also from one of the dialogue cards from the print of "Potemkin I had seen, from when the ship's doctor looks at the crawling things on the meat through the magnification of his bifocal lens: It's all right. They are only DEAD maggots!

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14 minutes ago, Defenestrator said:

A joke that we used preceding a meal in my house, also from one of the dialogue cards from the print of "Potemkin I had seen, from when the ship's doctor looks at the crawling things on the meat through the magnification of his bifocal lens: It's all right. They are only DEAD maggots!

My favorite title card from the film is from the anti-racism scene where the racist guy with a stupid expression on his face blurts out "Let's destroy the Jews!" right as they're talking about working together and leaving racism in the past. The scene is just so over the top and cartoony and the guy's expression is so stupid, it makes me laugh every time I see it. :lol: 

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59 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

My favorite title card from the film is from the anti-racism scene where the racist guy with a stupid expression on his face blurts out "Let's destroy the Jews!" right as they're talking about working together and leaving racism in the past. The scene is just so over the top and cartoony and the guy's expression is so stupid, it makes me laugh every time I see it. :lol: 

thank you for mentioning that, i was SHOCKED (and slightly amused as well) when that occurred (and loved the reaction of the crowd)....but then THE ODESSA STEPS SEQUENCE happened and eclipsed it from my memory.

it's amazing to me how some of the problems we struggle with today show themselves so clearly in films from 70, 80, and even 90 years ago....

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What a wonderful movie. Totally mesmerizing, with such hypnotic scenes of people swaying in action at the exact same time, purposely done like synchronized dance routines. A truly epic adventure to see for the first time and as my old literature professor once said, "Great art is something you can watch or see again and again without being bored. Knowing what is to come is actually even more of a joy as you reexperience it."

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Sadly, I apparently missed an interesting movie, Reset all my DirecTV boxes – been rockin’ to the latest version of Led Zeppelin, Greta Van Fleet’s “From the Fires” CD, while watching the following…

 

 

...wondering, if Harpo Marx sang, would he really sounds like Robert Plant? 😟

💋

 

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