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Obscure films with well-known stars


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8 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I don't think Letty Lynton has been broadcast at all, at least in the U.S.  After they lost the lawsuit not long after the film's release, it went into MGM's vaults.

Incidentally, the authors of the play, did allow producers Jack Chertok and Hunt Stromberg to re-use the story at United Artists. It was remade as DISHONORED LADY (1947) starring Hedy Lamarr. That one is in the public domain and easy to find on YouTube.

But the Joan Crawford precode version, which I've seen, is better.

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49 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I wonder if there's an English version anywhere, with Sordi and Mangano dubbed?

In an interview, Davis complained about Sordi's reluctance to do his dialogue in English. She claimed he had a very good command of the English language but was apprehensive about speaking it on screen. She had signed on to do the movie, thinking he would use English.

This was the third feature film collaboration for Davis & Cotten, after BEYOND THE FOREST and HUSH HUSH SWEET CHARLOTTE.

I don't think there was. I don't think Bette realized this before she signed on. I remember her calling Alberto Sordi, Alberto SORDID!

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30 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Incidentally, the authors of the play, did allow producers Jack Chertok and Hunt Stromberg to re-use the story at United Artists. It was remade as DISHONORED LADY (1947) starring Hedy Lamarr. That one is in the public domain and easy to find on YouTube.

But the Joan Crawford precode version, which I've seen, is better.

Yes, I haven't seen it. Don't want to spoil Joan's version if I ever see it.

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A film from 1971 (great review below):

screen-shot-2019-04-07-at-3.23.54-pm.jpe

An IMDb user says:

Unusual because the pirates depicted in this movie are all too real. None of the romanticizing Errol Flynn or Jack Sparrow stuff. These pirates were shockingly ruthless and a real sense of danger permeates the film. Yul Brynner and Kirk Douglas bring intensity to their roles. Brynner as the egotistic sociopath who is the leader of the cutthroats and Douglas as a man who must deal with a desperate situation in a fight for survival. Samantha Eggar as a woman with flawed instincts for her own preservation evokes frustration and pity. From the brutal opening scenes, the message is clear that these pirates don't play. A sense of urgency then takes over until the final outcome.

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I've seen and enjoyed 'Light at the End of the World'. Its a handsome production with a gorgeous, stark island locale; and the two male leads are played with intensity, yep. It's a 'Die Hard' long before 'Die Hard' was even a glimmer in anyone's mind.

Eggar is as usual, forgettable (to me anyway). What is more surprising is that the flick is almost stolen away from the two juggernauts by a third actor who is hardly/rarely ever mentioned in this (or even very many other films). In fact right at this moment, I am hard pressed to come up with his name. Italian actor. In this story, he is the assistant lighthouse keeper who cooperates with the pirates when master lighthouse keeper Kirk decides to fight the invaders. Something like that. Anyway the assistant is meek and soft-spoken and gentle, and thats why he draws so much of one's attention when these other two rake-hells are duking it out.

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Re: 'Light at the Edge of the World', I don't even know how they got a woman into that story at all. Seems ludicrous that Eggar's character is even present. Its literally a lighthouse at the tip of Patagonia or somewhere. Eh.

Anyway it rather reminds me of this flick I've long been waiting to see because it has one of my favorite limey actors in it (Ian Bannen). Love Ian Bannen. Five men..one woman...Station Six Sahara!

220px-%22Station_Six-Sahara%22_(1962).jp

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46 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

I've seen and enjoyed 'Light at the End of the World'. Its a handsome production with a gorgeous, stark island locale; and the two male leads are played with intensity, yep. It's a 'Die Hard' long before 'Die Hard' was even a glimmer in anyone's mind.

Eggar is as usual, forgettable (to me anyway). What is more surprising is that the flick is almost stolen away from the two juggernauts by a third actor who is hardly/rarely ever mentioned in this (or even very many other films). In fact right at this moment, I am hard pressed to come up with his name. Italian actor. In this story, he is the assistant lighthouse keeper who cooperates with the pirates when master lighthouse keeper Kirk decides to fight the invaders. Something like that. Anyway the assistant is meek and soft-spoken and gentle, and thats why he draws so much of one's attention when these other two rake-hells are duking it out.

I read how Studio Canal, the French company that owns the film, restored it. They supposedly removed one objectionable scene where a horse is shown being shot, which causes a continuity error. Eggar's character was probably added to help sell the film, even though a love story doesn't really develop between her character and Douglas. The original choice for Brynner's role was James Mason, who dropped out early in the production. Brynner and Douglas had previously worked together on CAST A GIANT SHADOW.

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This Angry Age (aka The Sea Wall, aka Barrage contre le Pacifique), directed by Rene Clement, based on a novel by Marguerite Duras. Jo Van Fleet plays a Frenchwoman trying to make a go of a rice plantation in Vietnam, then a French colony; Anthony Perkins and Silvana Mangano are her children; Richard Conte falls in love with Silvana; Alida Valli has an affair with Perkins; and Nehemiah Persoff is also, understandably, hot for Silvana. I've seen a version online which is black and white, with color only in the first scene. What a good color print in the proper ratios would look like, I can only imagine. It is, at the very least, very well acted and equally well directed.

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8 hours ago, kingrat said:

This Angry Age (aka The Sea Wall, aka Barrage contre le Pacifique), directed by Rene Clement, based on a novel by Marguerite Duras. Jo Van Fleet plays a Frenchwoman trying to make a go of a rice plantation in Vietnam, then a French colony; Anthony Perkins and Silvana Mangano are her children; Richard Conte falls in love with Silvana; Alida Valli has an affair with Perkins; and Nehemiah Persoff is also, understandably, hot for Silvana. I've seen a version online which is black and white, with color only in the first scene. What a good color print in the proper ratios would look like, I can only imagine. It is, at the very least, very well acted and equally well directed.

Never heard of it. Fascinating cast and director. I see it was a Columbia release.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_Angry_Age

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19 hours ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Re: 'Light at the Edge of the World', I don't even know how they got a woman into that story at all. Seems ludicrous that Eggar's character is even present. Its literally a lighthouse at the tip of Patagonia or somewhere. Eh.

Anyway it rather reminds me of this flick I've long been waiting to see because it has one of my favorite limey actors in it (Ian Bannen). Love Ian Bannen. Five men..one woman...Station Six Sahara!

220px-%22Station_Six-Sahara%22_(1962).jp

I just saw a wonderful film that I know you would be enarmored of, Sgt. Markoff!

It is called, "Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women" from 1968, and stars one of your favorite female thespians, Mamie Van Doren as Moana.

I recall being a big baseball fan, you said you first appreciated her talents when she dated Bo Belinski, and in this movie she brings a certain je ne sais quoi to the role, and it is only sad that Mamie never got to perform the part of Grushenka from Dostoevsky, as she wished. The movie is unique in that I could not tell if it was in color or black and white, due to some startling cinematographic technique, or maybe it is just faded, but Mamie and the women are magnificently attired in seashell brassieres and white hip-huggers and still can take on all the astronauts who have travelled to Venus to rescue their lost crew, proving as you've said many times, woman is stronger than man when it really counts.

One more reason to look for this gem, is that actor Gennadi Vernov who plays Astronaut Andre Freneau is a dead ringer for Ian Bannen, but of course without the fine Scottish accent. Look for this classic, and no thanks are necessary, Sarge!

P. S. Peter Bogdanovich directed this under an alias, but don't blame Mamie for that...okay?

Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women (1968)

Unrated | 1h 18min | Adventure, Sci-Fi
Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women Poster
 
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That bit about the 'seashell' decolletage' somewhat stirs my interest, amateur malacologist that I am. Surprised you guessed that about me. I wonder what shells they used.

Prehistoric women though, sounds like a film for a 'cavegirl'.

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7 minutes ago, rayban said:

8972dc51add0a79a60dde6994a71632b.jpg

Yeah, this MGM flick is in the Turner library...but for some reason TCM's programmers don't seem to like scheduling it. I guess it doesn't fit in with their themes or their idea of movie stars who are household names. It's neglected.

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I just watched Lana Turner in A LIFE OF HER OWN (1950).

Not a perfect presentation of her, but darned good, and VERY 1950!

Fun things included the price for a proper apartment in Manhattan, $3,000 yearly.(What would it be now? $5,000 rental---per month?)

Of course, an affair with a married man (Ray Milland) is doomed under the "Code", but the movie teaches some great life-lessons and Lana is a darned good actress in anything.

 

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Fate.jpg.4714eb0b056891c69a3ec33fe1897da1.jpg"Fate is the Hunter" (1964) is  a film I had never heard of before I watched it today. It features Glenn Ford, Rod Taylor,  Wally Cox, Nancy Kwan,  Suzanne Pleshette, and even a cameo by Jane Russell. I wouldn't recommend it except for the beginning and the end. In the middle it muddles about and is an absolute bore.

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On 4/13/2019 at 11:04 AM, TopBilled said:

Yeah, this MGM flick is in the Turner library...but for some reason TCM's programmers don't seem to like scheduling it. I guess it doesn't fit in with their themes or their idea of movie stars who are household names. It's neglected.

Looking at the helpful database by moviecollectoroh, it hasn't shown since 2014. Seems like its time to bring it out again.... unless Warner Archive is preparing a release and that is why its been AWOL.

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9 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Looking at the helpful database by moviecollectoroh, it hasn't shown since 2014. Seems like its time to bring it out again.... unless Warner Archive is preparing a release and that is why its been AWOL.

Yeah, the fact they didn't put it out on DVD shows what they think of it. It's not the most commercial film ever made by MGM...but it is a good example of what the studio was turning out at that point.

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Just now, TopBilled said:

Yeah, the fact they didn't put it out on DVD shows what they think of it. It's not the most commercial film ever made by MGM...but it is a good example of what the studio was turning out at that point.

I have been noticing though that some more lesser-known MGM films have been turning up on DVD recently. And some others have been popping up on TCM recently. The Guardsman from 1931 is on in a few months, and I'm wondering if that means that a DVd will be incoming at some date in the near future (ie just like the Wallace Beery Dean Stockwell film The Mighty McGurk, which aired last month, and was put on DVD on the 2nd of April)

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18 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

I have been noticing though that some more lesser-known MGM films have been turning up on DVD recently. And some others have been popping up on TCM recently. The Guardsman from 1931 is on in a few months, and I'm wondering if that means that a DVd will be incoming at some date in the near future (ie just like the Wallace Beery Dean Stockwell film The Mighty McGurk, which aired last month, and was put on DVD on the 2nd of April)

Interesting. I guess we'll have to wait and see if THE VINTAGE does come out on home video...

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The Wrong Man - (1993) - The Good, The Bad, And The Heart-breaker

Poster%2BThe%2BWrong%2BMan.jpg

Director: Jim McBride, Writers: Roy Carlson (story), Michael Thoma (screenplay), Cinematography by Affonso Beato. Stars: Rosanna Arquette, Kevin Anderson, John Lithgow, Jorge Cervera Jr. and Ernesto LaGuardia

Neo Noir, Half Road pic, half Policier, half dysfunctional Drama.

Noirish%2B01%2BThe%2BWrong%2BMan%2B1993.jpg

Noirish%2B02%2BThe%2BWrong%2BMan%2B1993.jpg

Kevin Anderson (The Good) plays a young 30-ish American, Alex Walker, a sailor on the run after a fight over a woman that went seriously wrong. He's fleeing from a manslaughter charge in Massachusetts, he says he didn't want to spend 10 years picking up cans along the highways.  His cargo ship The Starfish is working the Gulf coast of Mexico.

 Alex%2Band%2BMills.jpg

Mills%2Bthe%2BUgly%2BAmerican%2BThe%2BWrong%2BMan%2B1993.jpg

John Lithgow (The Bad) plays a chain smoking "ne plus ultra" Ugly American John Mills, channeling Henry Fonda and touches of other classic Noir performances, you see a bit of Jimmy Stewart and get impressions of Broderick Crawford, he's so very entertaining in the role, an excellent performance.

Missy%2BThe%2BWrong%2BMan%2B1993.jpg

Missy%2Band%2Bthe%2Bsea.jpg

Rosanna Arquette (The Heartbreaker) plays Missy, Mills' younger wife/common law friend with benefits, a real sweetheart Floozy of a Femme Fatale. Missy's past is shrouded in Noir. She spins a honey dipped, storybook fantasy background, but we learn later that she "worked" at an infamous Georgia highway truck stop in probable salacious endeavors "giving the best business in hash house history."  Arquette is playing the exact type of exhibitionist, free spirit role that in the late 50s early 60s would have been given to Brigitte Bardot, Arquette is smoking-ly sultry in this film and beautiful to watch, a siren luring men to their fate.

There is also a good policier angle that is nicely fleshed out of a young ambitious Mexican Criminal Law graduate Ortega played by Ernesto LaGuardia, who will remind you of a young Ricardo Montalban, vs. the old school Police Chief Diaz,  played excellently by Jorge Cervera Jr. who gives off a John Wayne/Harry Carey vibe. The cinematography is outstanding, the noir sequences to die for, the  Mexican locations humid-ly hypnotic.

I'm starting to believe that what makes Neo Noirs authentic Neo Noirs for me,  is not only a heavy dose of Noir stylistic cinematography along with a simple Noir storyline, but also a bit of cinematic memory, when you can picture the stars in these Neos as inheritors of Classic Noir star parts, or see a nod to Classic Noir type locations combined with an old school, without bells & whistles, low budget, "B" film artistry you reach the tipping point into full blown Noirsville.

I had to order this off Ebay from Hong Kong, it's worth it. It's equal to the best Neo Noirs of the 90s, a great, great soundtrack by Los Lobos too, 10/10 enjoy. Needs an official release.

Full review at Noirsville The Wrong Man. 😎
 

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

The Wrong Man - (1993) - The Good, The Bad, And The Heart-breaker

Poster%2BThe%2BWrong%2BMan.jpg

Director: Jim McBride, Writers: Roy Carlson (story), Michael Thoma (screenplay), Cinematography by Affonso Beato. Stars: Rosanna Arquette, Kevin Anderson, John Lithgow, Jorge Cervera Jr. and Ernesto LaGuardia

Neo Noir, Half Road pic, half Policier, half dysfunctional Drama.

Noirish%2B01%2BThe%2BWrong%2BMan%2B1993.jpg

Noirish%2B02%2BThe%2BWrong%2BMan%2B1993.jpg

Kevin Anderson (The Good) plays a young 30-ish American, Alex Walker, a sailor on the run after a fight over a woman that went seriously wrong. He's fleeing from a manslaughter charge in Massachusetts, he says he didn't want to spend 10 years picking up cans along the highways.  His cargo ship The Starfish is working the Gulf coast of Mexico.

 Alex%2Band%2BMills.jpg

Mills%2Bthe%2BUgly%2BAmerican%2BThe%2BWrong%2BMan%2B1993.jpg

John Lithgow (The Bad) plays a chain smoking "ne plus ultra" Ugly American John Mills, channeling Henry Fonda and touches of other classic Noir performances, you see a bit of Jimmy Stewart and get impressions of Broderick Crawford, he's so very entertaining in the role, an excellent performance.

Missy%2BThe%2BWrong%2BMan%2B1993.jpg

Missy%2Band%2Bthe%2Bsea.jpg

Rosanna Arquette (The Heartbreaker) plays Missy, Mills' younger wife/common law friend with benefits, a real sweetheart Floozy of a Femme Fatale. Missy's past is shrouded in Noir. She spins a honey dipped, storybook fantasy background, but we learn later that she "worked" at an infamous Georgia highway truck stop in probable salacious endeavors "giving the best business in hash house history."  Arquette is playing the exact type of exhibitionist, free spirit role that in the late 50s early 60s would have been given to Brigitte Bardot, Arquette is smoking-ly sultry in this film and beautiful to watch, a siren luring men to their fate.

There is also a good policier angle that is nicely fleshed out of a young ambitious Mexican Criminal Law graduate Ortega played by Ernesto LaGuardia, who will remind you of a young Ricardo Montalban, vs. the old school Police Chief Diaz,  played excellently by Jorge Cervera Jr. who gives off a John Wayne/Harry Carey vibe. The cinematography is outstanding, the noir sequences to die for, the  Mexican locations humid-ly hypnotic.

I'm starting to believe that what makes Neo Noirs authentic Neo Noirs for me,  is not only a heavy dose of Noir stylistic cinematography along with a simple Noir storyline, but also a bit of cinematic memory, when you can picture the stars in these Neos as inheritors of Classic Noir star parts, or see a nod to Classic Noir type locations combined with an old school, without bells & whistles, low budget, "B" film artistry you reach the tipping point into full blown Noirsville.

I had to order this off Ebay from Hong Kong, it's worth it. It's equal to the best Neo Noirs of the 90s, a great, great soundtrack by Los Lobos too, 10/10 enjoy. Needs an official release.

Full review at Noirsville The Wrong Man. 😎
 

Sounds very interesting, whatever happened to Kevin Anderson, who seemed destined for stardom?

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