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Quentin Tarantino


cigarjoe
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A friend of mine (anticipated this thread) just quoted Tarantino in a new book about Once Upon A Time In The West (1969) by Christopher Frayling.

In his "foreword" (really just a long tape-recorded ramble) to Once Upon a Time in the West: Shooting a Masterpiece, QT takes the opportunity to talk about his favorite film, The Good The Bad And The Ugly (GBU). He eventually gets to OUATITW, but I find his comments below quite interesting. I have returned Tarantino's spellings to American ones, and cut some of the repetition. 

Quote
I love [GBU] more than [OUATITW] because I think it’s funnier and a little less self-satisfied with its own masterpieceness. It has been my favorite since I was a little kid because I saw it when I was crazy young and loved it. That’s never changed . . . GBU is my favorite movie and my favorite line in all movies is: “There are two kinds of people in the world. . . those with loaded guns and those who dig.” That movie is consistently witty, but with a certain kind of wit, a certain sense of humor. That is, this weird mythic macho gallows sense of humor that runs throughout the whole thing. It is just so funny. Almost whenever they open their mouths, you hear some of the funniest lines I have heard in my life. To think that it was written in Italian and then we hear the translated version and it is still that funny—it just blows me away. . . . And the cinematic set pieces and the orchestration of music with the images. Obviously those things. I think it’s a combination of those with the fact that . . . I remember even feeling this from the point when I was a little boy watching it . . . the characters are so disreputable. The fact that Eastwood being called The Good is ironic. The whole world he created, there’s something really special about it.

The characters are so disreputable and you follow this really weird rag-tag adventure with them where they’re tossed from one situation to another. That really shouldn’t be as compelling as it is, nor should they be as compelling as they are. But they are. Wherever they get tossed you go with them to that place. It never seems disjointed. It never seems like it’s a bunch of vignettes strung together. You truly go on an adventure and it never proclaims itself as an adventure, other than they’re looking for the gold. We want these characters to have a bond—especially Clint Eastwood and Eli Wallach. It kills us that they don’t. So we emotionally supply the bond, which is one of the reasons why we have a rooting interest in the movie. We emotionally supply the bond that the characters on screen obviously don’t have because we are now bonded with them. We care about them. . .

To me one of the most weird things in the history of cinema is, after going through this incredible journey in GBU, we have fallen in love with Eastwood and Wallach. . . but they still screw each other over. You actually think that the Man With No Name might just hang Tuco at the end of the movie and it is so crushing you are thinking, “Can’t you guys just feel something of the way that we feel toward you?” No one else would do a three-hour epic where there really is no bond between these guys no matter what they have been through. There’s a beauty in that. They’ve gone through so much together. You love them. You can’t believe one would betray the other in that way. But then you also know that Tuco would have done the same thing to him in two seconds, if not worse . . . Probably worse. But the thing is you go through this adventure with them and then you have this emotional commitment that you add to it. Then after this whole rag-tag adventure, it ends up at that shootout. Which by the way, he shot the showdown in the bullring as if the looking for the grave scene, the “ecstasy of gold” wouldn’t be enough. As if the Civil War scene wouldn’t be enough. He goes to that bullring and I think the greatest piece of music  ever written for a movie is matched with the greatest scene ever shot. I mean, really."


Nothing profound here, but QT has obviously spent a lot of time thinking about the movie, and he probably expresses the sentiments of many. I like the fact that he has a glimmer of understanding of what GBU 2: Tuco's Revenge would be like. An unstoppable force like Tuco would certainly come after his "friend-o" for the money he stole. It's all Tuco's money, and he can't stop until he gets it all back.

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I love GBU too. The final shootout with the three leads was a great scene. As Tarantino says, the music is great, though my favorite part was the close up of the eyes, Eastwood's squinty ones, Lee Van Cleef's reptilian ones and Wallach's wild ones. 

I am a Tarantino fan as well, my favorite maybe "Kill Bill Vol 1" a great homage to martial arts and 1970s exploitation, complete with a fantastic soundtrack.

Funniest line was Wallach saying to one gunman "If you're gonna shoot, shoot! Don't talk!"

Edited by Det Jim McLeod
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When I first attempted Pulp Fiction I switched it off when the guy got it sitting on the couch. No way! But I was of the uninitiated at that time and later came back to view and appreciate. I love Reservoir Dogs, Inglorious Basterds, and Jackie Brown. My first attempt of Kill Bill was a disaster. I say that having watched about 10 minutes and no more. I thought it a stupid, virtual comic-book for 12-year-olds. ((I remember thinking ; Uma, what happened to that innocent ingenue type you used to play, my how you have changed). But that was early on as well and if I ever go back to it again (doubtful) I might have a different take, being solidly in the Tarantino camp now. I have his films gripping. Who can deny that he is an outstanding filmmaker. Recently I caught The Hateful Eight on Netflix streaming and enjoyed it, but without knowing or realizing that it was Tarantino. Afterwards I reproached myself for not having recognized the Tarantino touch. I see from Lawrence's excellent display of posters that there are three I haven't seen. Goody, goody. Netflix DVD service has Django and it is currently numero uno in the queue.

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There are QT movies I like, and a few I don't.  And some I've never seen possibly due to the subject mater( to my understanding) didn't interest me enough to bother. Who directed a movie is never as important to me as, maybe, who's in it, or what it might be about. For instance....

I didn't like EITHER KILL BILL flick, but I think(in my case) it had more to do with UMA THURMAN being the main character more than who directed it or the subject matter.  I prefer her more in supporting roles, or peripheral characters that means she's not seen all that much in the movie.  It's really an "each their own" kinda thing.

Sepiatone

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On 4/27/2019 at 9:53 AM, cigarjoe said:

What.... I started a Tarantino thread at the request of some members and nobody posts misswonderly3 I'm looking at you..... :D

Sorry, joe. I've been away from this site for a couple of days and was unaware til now that you'd started this thread.

I'm hoping to see Once Upon a Time in Hollywood in a theatre. I think that's the best way to see this guy's films.

Despite my avowed liking for Mr. Tarantino's work, I have a little catching up to do. I still haven't seen The Hateful Eight, which came out a few years ago.

I'll have to re-read Tarantino's comments on The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, but my first impression is that he's quite a fan of Sergio Leone - I think I already knew that, but I didn't know he'd given so much thought to Leone's work.

I do have more to say about QT, but it's late and I'm getting sleepy. Anyway, thanks for starting the thread, cg.

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I loved Pulp Fiction, thought the whole cast was great and loved the 3 over lapping stories. That dance scene with Uma and Travolta is unforgettable. There was so much humor in the film that even with the over the top violence in so many scenes that would normally turn me off( I'm not a great fan of over the top violence in films) didn't. I also really enjoyed both Kill Bill 1 and Kill Bill2 and for the same reason, although I think I remember turning away during a few of the very violent scenes I found a lot of humor in the the Kill Bill films. Too tired to write more about the films, but count me in as a big fan of all 3 films.

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On 4/26/2019 at 4:20 PM, cigarjoe said:

Quote
I love [GBU] more than [OUATITW] because I think it’s funnier and a little less self-satisfied with its own masterpieceness.

(Sorry, I gotta do one of these...)

...LOOK WHO'S TALKING!!

(I'll show myself out...)

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I enjoy all of Tarantino's films except for Django Unchained and The Hateful Eight. I have not seen either since they were in theaters, so I will certainly watch them again at some point. I did not like how they both just turn into cartoonish gorefests in the latter halves. Seemed so childish and uninteresting to me.

My favorite film of his would probably be Jackie Brown or Kill Bill (if I can count both volumes together as one film).

An interesting tidbit about Tarantino, especially regarding his affinity for westerns, is that he is on record saying that he hates John Ford because he felt that Ford was a racist. That comment made me roll my eyes so hard that they came unscrewed, popped out, and rolled across the floor.

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

His 9th film coming soon....

I wonder which ones out of those I listed above he or the marketing team are choosing to ignore, since Once Upon a Time in Hollywood would be the 11th. Four Rooms, perhaps, as he just directed sections of it? And maybe counting the two Kill Bill movies as one?

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4 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I wonder which ones out of those I listed above he or the marketing team are choosing to ignore, since Once Upon a Time in Hollywood would be the 11th. Four Rooms, perhaps, as he just directed sections of it? And maybe counting the two Kill Bill movies as one?

Bingo yea Kill Bill is referred to as Vol 1 & 2, and Four Rooms is a como effort (there must be a name for these) what do they call O. Henry's Full House?

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56 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Bingo yea Kill Bill is referred to as Vol 1 & 2, and Four Rooms is a como effort (there must be a name for these) what do they call O. Henry's Full House?

They usually call them anthology or portmanteau films.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

They usually call them anthology or portmanteau films.

Yeah "anthology", but "portmanteau"? Well, that's a new one on me here, anyway.

(...kind'a sounds like where Bogart is headed in Action in the North Atlantic, doesn't it?!)

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Tarantino’s “Hollywood” Is His Most Personal?

tarantinos-hollywood-is-his-most-persona

For a while there, Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” was being referred to as his Manson Family movie, mainly due to Sharon Tate being a major role in the story and the casting of the much-in-demand Margot Robbie in the part.

As more details emerged it became clear that it was more of a minor subplot or background element, and the main thrust of the film follows Leonardo DiCaprio’s fading TV western star Rick Dalton and his stunt double/best friend Cliff played by Brad Pitt trying to survive Hollywood in the summer of 1969.

Speaking with EW this week, producer David Heyman wants to make it clear the film is much more than a ‘Manson Movie’ and it’s a stigma the film is trying to shake off somewhat:

“That’s one of the big misconceptions to clarify. It’s the three classes of Hollywood. There’s the high Hollywood of Sharon, the declining star of Rick, and there’s Cliff, who lives farther out and with more humble means. These are two people who have a history together and the loyalty that they have for one another is really potent. It’s really a film about that friendship and about the power of that friendship as they go on their journeys together and separately. This is Quentin’s most personal film. This is his memories of growing up in Los Angeles and being a fan of Hollywood.”

Producer Shannon McIntosh adds Tarantino has gone out of his way to make sure he honors the victim’s legacy and doesn’t exploit the tragedy, wanting to very much avoid this being dubbed an exploitation piece about Tate’s murder:

“[Quentin] absolutely embraced Debra Tate [Sharon Tate’s sister], and that was very important to him and to us that she’d be comfortable with what we’re doing because obviously anyone thinking that we’re making it a Manson movie, which we’re not, but he was very sensitive to that and remains sensitive to that.”

With the film skipping Cannes because it won’t be ready in time, it seems like everyone will be seeing the movie around the same time when “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” hits cinemas on July 26th.

http://www.darkhorizons.com/tarantinos-hollywood-is-his-most-personal/

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Just now, LawrenceA said:

Tarantino’s “Hollywood” Is His Most Personal?

tarantinos-hollywood-is-his-most-persona

For a while there, Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” was being referred to as his Manson Family movie, mainly due to Sharon Tate being a major role in the story and the casting of the much-in-demand Margot Robbie in the part.

As more details emerged it became clear that it was more of a minor subplot or background element, and the main thrust of the film follows Leonardo DiCaprio’s fading TV western star Rick Dalton and his stunt double/best friend Cliff played by Brad Pitt trying to survive Hollywood in the summer of 1969.

Speaking with EW this week, producer David Heyman wants to make it clear the film is much more than a ‘Manson Movie’ and it’s a stigma the film is trying to shake off somewhat:

“That’s one of the big misconceptions to clarify. It’s the three classes of Hollywood. There’s the high Hollywood of Sharon, the declining star of Rick, and there’s Cliff, who lives farther out and with more humble means. These are two people who have a history together and the loyalty that they have for one another is really potent. It’s really a film about that friendship and about the power of that friendship as they go on their journeys together and separately. This is Quentin’s most personal film. This is his memories of growing up in Los Angeles and being a fan of Hollywood.”

Producer Shannon McIntosh adds Tarantino has gone out of his way to make sure he honors the victim’s legacy and doesn’t exploit the tragedy, wanting to very much avoid this being dubbed an exploitation piece about Tate’s murder:

“[Quentin] absolutely embraced Debra Tate [Sharon Tate’s sister], and that was very important to him and to us that she’d be comfortable with what we’re doing because obviously anyone thinking that we’re making it a Manson movie, which we’re not, but he was very sensitive to that and remains sensitive to that.”

With the film skipping Cannes because it won’t be ready in time, it seems like everyone will be seeing the movie around the same time when “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” hits cinemas on July 26th.

http://www.darkhorizons.com/tarantinos-hollywood-is-his-most-personal/

I still wish in a way though that Burt Reynolds could have filmed his scenes before he died. True, Bruce Dern is a good replacement, but it would have been nice to see a last hurrah for Reynolds. I think the film will be dedicated to him and Luke Perry (who did finish his scenes)

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“Django Unchained” Getting A Director’s Cut

django-unchained-getting-a-directors-cut

Filmmaker Quentin Tarantino has spoken about the recently discovered ‘four-episode’ extended cut of “The Hateful Eight” which was made for Netflix, and in the process revealed a new cut of his biggest box-office hit “Django Unchained” is on the way.

The Netflix version of “The H8teful Eight” breaks up the film into a mini-series format of four episodes of around 50 minutes each – incorporating at least 25 minutes of new footage back into the movie which makes sequences play very different.

Many thought this was just Netflix playing around, but it turns out filmmaker curated and oversaw the new miniseries cut himself after Netflix proposed the idea to him. Speaking with Slashfilm, Tarantino says:

“About a year after [the film] released, maybe a little less, me and my editor, Fred Raskin, we got together and then we worked real hard. We edited the film down into 50-minute bits, and we very easily got four episodes out of it. We didn’t re-edit the whole thing from scratch, but we did a whole lot of re-editing, and it plays differently.

Some sequences are more similar than others compared to the film, but it has a different feeling. It has a different feeling that I actually really like a lot. And there was a literary aspect to the film anyway, so it definitely has this ‘chapters unfolding’ quality.”

Asked if he would do something like this again like with “Kill Bill,” he reveals the new cut of ‘Django’ is on the way but that will remain a film rather than become a mini-series:

“In the case of Kill Bill the Whole Bloody Affair, Kill Bill is the one movie I’ve made where everything I shot is in the movie, because we had two movies. But for instance, take Django [Unchained], I’ve actually cut a director’s cut of Django. That’s about like three hours and 15 minutes, or three hours and 20 minutes, something like that.

That’s one I wouldn’t do as a miniseries, because it would just be better [as a movie]. I thought about that idea, but that would just work better as one movie. Just a longer one as far as I was concerned. So I’ve actually done that. We’re just kind of waiting some time after Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, and we’ll release that eventually.”

Finally, he touched upon his involvement with the “Star Trek” film franchise and says he’s been busy making “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” and once he’s finished “we’ll pick up talking about it again”. He also adds that not only have they talked about a story and a script, but a script has been written.

http://www.darkhorizons.com/django-unchained-getting-a-directors-cut/

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I couldn't get through Django Unchained. I guess my time is just too valuable. A flop for Tarantino. Leonardo didn't help. I have never seen him act with any depth. He has tremendous good looks for his roles but that doesn't go far enough. The movie itself had no edge to it. I didn't care about anything. I won't say the movie was boring but I will say I was bored. By rights, Tarantino should not succeed with me. He violates my sensibilities. He should not be my cup of tea. But the truth is that I am rapt with attention and admiration for just about anything he has done. Except this one. Not up to the usual standard.

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2 hours ago, laffite said:

I couldn't get through Django Unchained. I guess my time is just too valuable. A flop for Tarantino. Leonardo didn't help. I have never seen him act with any depth. He has tremendous good looks for his roles but that doesn't go far enough. The movie itself had no edge to it. I didn't care about anything. I won't say the movie was boring but I will say I was bored. By rights, Tarantino should not succeed with me. He violates my sensibilities. He should not be my cup of tea. But the truth is that I am rapt with attention and admiration for just about anything he has done. Except this one. Not up to the usual standard.

I liked it up to the ending which I thought was a bit much. If you've seen the Spaghetti Westerns of Franco Nero especially The Mercenary and Companeros you'd see that actor Christoph Waltz was doing a pretty good immitation of Nero in those two films.

Is it a serious Western? no, is it a comedy Western? no, is it a picaresque tongue-in-cheek over the top homage to American Westerns, Spaghetti Westerns, Blaxpoitation films, and American popular culture, YES! 

The theater was packed when I saw it, young, old, black, white. At the end there was even a scattering of applause. Is it a Great Western no, but it was refreshing to see a non PC Western that wasn't a remake, wasn't historically accurate, wasn't touchy freely, wasn't serious in the least. 7-8/10.

 

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3 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Is it a serious Western? no, is it a comedy Western? no, is it a picaresque tongue-in-cheek over the top homage to American Westerns, Spaghetti Westerns, Blaxpoitation films, and American popular culture, YES! 

This is the problem. He touches all the bases but he forgot to hit the ball. The Tarantino touch is there but it is anemic. Clearly an inferior effort. But YES, all the little checkpoints are there.

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

This is the problem. He touches all the bases but he forgot to hit the ball. The Tarantino touch is there but it is anemic. Clearly an inferior effort. But YES, all the little checkpoints are there.

Django Unchained was the first film that Tarantino made since his longtime editor Sally Menke died unexpectedly in 2010. She had edited every one of his films from Reservoir Dogs on, and was nominated for the Best Editing Oscar for Inglourious Basterds.

Her absence has been very noticeable to me in both Django and The Hateful Eight.

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