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Those Cartoon Characters You Still Love And Those You Out Grew


TomJH
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Many of us grew up watching cartoons on our televisions, often on Saturday mornings, and there sure were a lot to choose from.

I was big, as a kid, on Donald Duck, Mighty Mouse, Bugs Bunny, Popeye, Caspar the Friendly Ghost and the Flintstones. With the exceptions of Bugs and Popeye (at least the early Fleischer Popeyes) I seem to have outgrown most of them now.

The Disney comedy shorts, with Donald, Mickey and Goofy, while beautifully animated, I find pretty sappy as far as the stories and characters are concerned. I also find them designed for kids to an almost exclusive degree.

On the other hand the Looney Tunes shorts at Warners, with Bugs and Daffy and Elmer Fudd and the rest, were created for adults in the cinema audience, thus the reason I think their (sometimes even risque) humour holds up far better, for me, at least, than the Disney stuff.

Anyway, got any favourites still? Which of those cartoon characters you saw as a kid still entertain you, and which are the ones that you leave to your childhood and don't really care to re-visit?

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It was Looney Tunes all the way for me! I could never get enough of them.The real treat was when my parents would take my sisters and I to a local privately owned movie house that showed classic films on Saturday nights. They would show the Looney Tunes cartoons before the main feature. Really fun! I agree; they are more for adults.

I also liked The Adventures of Rocky And Bullwinkle a lot and still find it funny.

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8 minutes ago, sagebrush said:

It was Looney Tunes all the way for me! I could never get enough of them.The real treat was when my parents would take my sisters and I to a local privately owned movie house that showed classic films on Saturday nights. They would show the Looney Tunes cartoons before the main feature. Really fun! I agree; they are more for adults.

I also liked The Adventures of Rocky And Bullwinkle a lot and still find it funny.

For some reason I didn't watch Rocky and Bullwinkle that much as a kid, and I've always suspected I missed out on some pretty clever humour.

I'll tell you one thing, though: I can do a spot on verbal imitation of Bullwinkle.

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6 hours ago, sagebrush said:

It was Looney Tunes all the way for me! I could never get enough of them.The real treat was when my parents would take my sisters and I to a local privately owned movie house that showed classic films on Saturday nights. They would show the Looney Tunes cartoons before the main feature. Really fun! I agree; they are more for adults.

I also liked The Adventures of Rocky And Bullwinkle a lot and still find it funny.

 

Wish they did an episode of this...

https://www.ktva.com/story/38346721/wildlife-officials-sedate-moose-shot-with-target-arrow

Hey Rocky, watch me pull an arrow out of my ***. :P

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7 hours ago, TomJH said:

For some reason I didn't watch Rocky and Bullwinkle that much as a kid, and I've always suspected I missed out on some pretty clever humour.

I'll tell you one thing, though: I can do a spot on verbal imitation of Bullwinkle.

It was never on, at any of the stations I could find it, and never hooked onto its genius until DVD.

8 hours ago, TomJH said:

I was big, as a kid, on Donald Duck, Mighty Mouse, Bugs Bunny, Popeye, Caspar the Friendly Ghost and the Flintstones. With the exceptions of Bugs and Popeye (at least the early Fleischer Popeyes) I seem to have outgrown most of them now.

You NEVER outgrow the Fleischer Popeyes or the Flintstones.  You only develop a new appreciation for how many of the lines you missed as a short-attention-span kid.  (Eg. all of Popeye's ad-lib muttering, which explains how Robin Williams got the live-action movie.)

When we were kids, it took us years to appreciate the surreal, satiric quality of some of the Flintstones gags--We used to drive our parents crazy with the episode where the characters are watching TV, and hear:
Announcer:  "Tonight's story, of a husband who runs away after his twelfth child is born, is called 'Have Enough--Will Travel'."  But first, a word from our sponsor:
Sponsor:  "Ladies and gentlemen...(sad Traumerei music) This program is costing me a fortune, so please...(sob!)...BUY MY PRODUCT!!"

Or FTM, any of the pre-Flintstones Hanna-Barbera shorts:  There was a hip subversive genius at work in some of the Yogi Bear, Huckleberry Hound, Quick-Draw McGraw and Snagglepuss cartoons--The latter two being written by Michael Maltese, fresh off of the classic Chuck Jones cartoons after Warner closed its cartoon division.  (And if you grew up versed in vintage humor enough to recognize that Quick-Draw was imitating Red Skelton and Snagglepuss was doing an amazingly dead-on Bert Lahr, it improved your cultural comedy education.)

8 hours ago, TomJH said:

Mr. Magoo

After years of growing up with only the Classic-Tales version, finally found the vintage Columbia theatrical shorts on DVD--Another bit of subversive genius, as the entire world would just coincidentally fall into place with Magoo's nearsighted delusions, and cosmically prevent him from ever finding out he was wrong.  

And, since nobody's yet mentioned the Pink Panther (who else could walk to his own theme music?):  B)

 

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Or FTM, any of the pre-Flintstones Hanna-Barbera shorts:  There was a hip subversive genius at work in some of the Yogi Bear, Huckleberry Hound, Quick-Draw McGraw and Snagglepuss cartoons--The latter two being written by Michael Maltese, fresh off of the classic Chuck Jones cartoons after Warner closed its cartoon division.  (And if you grew up versed in vintage humor enough to recognize that Quick-Draw was imitating Red Skelton and Snagglepuss was doing an amazingly dead-on Bert Lahr, it improved your cultural comedy education.)

 

You mean when I do my "Exit, stage left" impersonation of Snagglepus I'm really doing Bert Lahr?

And I have to say that I think Bullwinkle was the one doing Red Skelton's Clem Kadiddlehopper.

My Quick Draw McGraw impersonation was always comprised of "I'll do the thinin' around here, Bubber."

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3 hours ago, TomJH said:

You mean when I do my "Exit, stage left" impersonation of Snagglepus I'm really doing Bert Lahr?

It's amazing the "...Oh, DUH!" moments I get when I have to point out that Snagglepuss is a cowardly lion...  :D

(Props to cartoon voice Daws Butler for also capturing Lahr's obnoxious rapid-fire style of jokes.  Lahr was still around in the 60's doing the potato-chip commercials, so Butler had Lahr's barging king-of-the-forest burlesque rhythms down to a T...And an X, Y and Z...And a J through Q inclusive, even!)

Quote

And I have to say that I think Bullwinkle was the one doing Red Skelton's Clem Kaddiddlehopper.

My Quick Draw McGraw impersonation was always comprised of "I'll do the thinin' around here, Bubber."

Leaving aside the obvious Sheriff Deadeye, compare Clem Kadiddlehopper's "Da-a-a-isy June!" to Quick-Draw's "Do-o-o-n't you fergit it!"

But like the other Maltese cartoons, the Quick-Draw McGraw cartoons had the same early-HB subversive quality of "winking" at the audience and fourth-wall parodying themselves:

---

Narrator:  "With the taming of the West, the battle between the cattle rancher and the sheepherder raged on:"

(Two cowboys, on opposite sides of the same rock, a foot away from each other, take turns crouching, standing, and firing over the other's head)

Narrator:  "Until a common disaster forged a shaky peace:"
(click, click!)
Cowboy 1:  "Hey, I'm plumb outta bullets!"

Cowboy 2:  "Me too!  This looks like a common disaster!" 

Cowboy 1:  "Whaddya say we forge a shaky peace?"

:D

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4 hours ago, hamradio said:

Beside some of the ones mentioned but also...

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Casper

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Aquaman

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Be interesting if Hollywood bring the Herculoids and Space Ghost to life.  Some years back a fan had a design neater than this, can no longer find the image.

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wish someone would update the Herculoids theme and without the distracting sound effects. that theme rocks and so does the theme to Birdman and also Samson and Goliath.

:)

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Anything by Tex Avery elicits big laughs from me, still to this day.

However, my favorite cartoon short of all time has for years been the Chuck Jones one where while tunneling to Pismo Beach, Bugs and Daffy happen upon a certain Arabian thief's treasure after making that "wrong toin at Albekoikee", in 1957's Ali Baba Bunny.

(...c'mon now...how can ANYONE keep from laughing at lines such as "Open Saskatchewan?...Open Sarsaparilla?", "DOWN, DOWN, DOWN! GO, GO, GO! It's MINE, MINE, MINE!", "I can't help it. I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby!" and the ever-popular "Hassan CHOP!!!", among many others)

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5 hours ago, EricJ said:

Or FTM, any of the pre-Flintstones Hanna-Barbera shorts:  There was a hip subversive genius at work in some of the Yogi Bear, Huckleberry Hound, Quick-Draw McGraw and Snagglepuss cartoons--

I never gave early Hanna-Barbera cartoons much of a chance, Flintstones or otherwise, even when I was a kid. I never thought they were funny, and the terrible animation was uninteresting and slightly insulting to me. :lol: (Such a difference from the Fleischer Popeye cartoons, which were so awesomely detailed and visually absurd.) Tho, I also grew up on a later generation of Hanna-Barbera cartoons which I did find pretty funny, and the animation seemed a lot better to me, such as JOHNNY BRAVO. (Johnny was a womanizing, delusional man-child, and even back then I thought he was such a bizarre character for a kid's cartoon! I loved adult-themed humor.)

I'm intrigued by your statement about the subversive genius of these cartoons, tho. I might be willing to give another chance to these as a grown-up. Maybe I would finally "get" why they were so popular. I'm sure I'd get a lot more of the references! (Heck, I never knew what THE HONEYMOONERS was, all of that stuff was lost on me.) Doesn't it seem like most all of classic cartoon characters were based on some movie/tv show character? Who needs a new idea when you can just make fun of Charles Boyer?...

Right now the only cartoon I can think of from my generation that really continues to impress me is COURAGE THE COWARDLY DOG. The creator must have been inspired by the weirder, more grotesque cartoons such as REN & STIMPY, because COURAGE certainly veered toward somewhat more horrific subjects than one might expect from a kid's show, but the light comedy touch and Courage-to-the-rescue formula stripped it of it's power to disturb us youngins, (unlike REN & STIMPY, which I'm still recovering from!) It's just a higher-quality than most of the other things I saw coming out back then. The concept, the setting, the characters, the strange blend of visual styles- all of it seemed heads above the rest.

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(Uh... would you believe no pun was intended?)

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40 minutes ago, Kay said:

I never gave early Hanna-Barbera cartoons much of a chance, Flintstones or otherwise, even when I was a kid. I never thought they were funny, and the terrible animation was uninteresting and slightly insulting. :lol: (Such a difference from the Fleischer Popeye cartoons, which were so awesomely detailed and visually absurd.)

Even though Chuck Jones complained about "animated sitcoms", H-B hit on the idea that since the cartoons couldn't really move, they at least had to TALK--And when experienced ex-theatrical animators felt they'd come "down" to TV, there was a little sense that they were smart enough to amuse themselves with humor that was above what kids would expect.

Early H-B humor (I'd put it up to anything before Baby Pebbles was born in the third Flintstones season, after which H-B started turning Saturday-morning and commercial) had--I wouldn't call it a "fourth-wall" style, in the sense of Rocky & Bullwinkle joking about their own show, but still a sense that even if you were ahead of the joke, the writers were winking that they were ahead of you being ahead of the joke:  When things got too traditional-cartoon, they'd suddenly slip in a funny line-read, a sudden wiseguy insult, or just any "what?" absurdity that would simply catch you off guard out of nowhere, in case you were taking it too seriously.

Favorite example was a Yogi Bear cartoon where Ranger Smith is a nervous wreck waiting for the Park Superintendent to arrive, and Yogi plays him off of that--With five minutes to go, Yogi happens to show up at the ranger's station, and the Ranger panickedly tries to bribe him off with a picnic basket:
Ranger:  "Here, Yogi, take this:"
Yogi:  "But sir, I--"
Ranger:  "Don't ask any questions, just take this picnic basket, loaded with goodies:  Liverwurst sandwiches, pizza pies, ice-cream tortonis, just take it in the woods and get lost!"
Yogi:  "Thank you, si--Ice cream what?"

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I loved watching Looney Tunes when I was little.  I also used to watch Looney Tunes on Saturday morning cartoons--I think the show was called The Bugs and Tweety Show. Looney Tunes also used to be on Cartoon Network.  I'll admit that I'm not as big a fan of what I presume is "Later Looney Tunes," like Tweety, Sylvester, Wile E. Coyote, Roadrunner, Speedy Gonzales... I got bored with those ones as they seemed to have the same premise over and over--and they went away from the celebrity parodies.  As a kid obsessed with old movies, I knew who almost all of the celebrities were that they were parodying.  Recently, Cartoon Network aired a show called The New Looney Tunes Show, it was an animated Looney Tunes show done in a sitcom format. Bugs Bunny has retired and Daffy Duck is his roommate that mooches off of him.  Witch Hazel and her son Gossamer live down the street, as does Yosemite Sam.  Foghorn Leghorn is a local businessman.  Elmer Fudd does the nightly news.  It got mixed reviews, but my husband and I thought it was hilarious.  I own three volumes of Looney Tunes on Blu Ray and the cartoons are still funny each and every time I watch them.

I also loved Ducktales, actually the entire Disney Afternoon.  In addition to Ducktales, there was Chip N' Dale Rescue Rangers, Darkwing Duck, Tale Spin, Goof Troop, Gargoyles, and Adventures of the Gummi Bears

After school, I loved watching Animaniacs, Tiny Toon Adventures and Batman: The Animated Series.  'Batman,' is a fantastic cartoon.  It has a very noirish feel. 

When I was really little, I loved watching Care Bears, Rainbow Brite, The Potato Head Kids, Thundercats, Transformers, He-Man: Master of the Universe, She-Ra, Heathcliff, Garfield and Friends, The Flintstone Kids, A Pup Named Scooby Doo, The Real Ghostbusters, The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Jem, Muppet Babies... I can't say that I've really watched any of these cartoons since I was really little--with odd episodes of Garfield and Friends and Muppet Babies here and there.

If I watch cartoons, I'll still watch Looney Tunes, vintage Disney, Animaniacs, Batman: The Animated Series, Tiny Toon Adventures, Ducktales, The Flintstones, and The Jetsons.  I find that all of these shows still hold up.  

I will add as well that there is a new Ducktales cartoon on Disney Channel and it is excellent--not as good as the original, but it is still a good cartoon in its own right.  It's a new take on the cartoon, not a remake. 

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11 minutes ago, hamradio said:

I only watched the 1960's Flinstones, but nothing after except the movie. Almost forgot the original Scooby Doo (none of Scrappy)

 

Scrappy was the worst! He was the "Cousin Oliver" of Scooby Doo.  I did enjoy the episodes with the celebrities though.  The episode with Vincent Price was one of my favorites.

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I'll never "outgrow" my love of animation, and will always enjoy those I liked as a kid whether for their still enjoyable quality or maybe the nostalgia factor. And some of my favorites then will always be my favorites, even though they're long gone.  Like....

MICHIGAN J. FROG from the WB "Looney Toons" collection.

ROCKY and BULLWINKLE and all their "co-horts"  BORIS BADENOV  and NATASHA, MR. PEABODY and SHERMAN, DUDLEY DO-RIGHT and all the others.  ;) 

Many early DISNEY Mickey, Donald and other creations.  

And also a lot of TERRY 'TOONS and WALTER LANTZ animated stuff.  AND the old POPEYE 'toons before his change from the Merchant Marine to the Navy (late '50's I think....)

Sepiatone

 

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16 hours ago, Dargo said:

Anything by Tex Avery elicits big laughs from me, still to this day.

However, my favorite cartoon short of all time has for years been the Chuck Jones one where while tunneling to Pismo Beach, Bugs and Daffy happen upon a certain Arabian thief's treasure after making that "wrong toin at Albekoikee", in 1957's Ali Baba Bunny.

(...c'mon now...how can ANYONE keep from laughing at lines such as "Open Saskatchewan?...Open Sarsaparilla?", "DOWN, DOWN, DOWN! GO, GO, GO! It's MINE, MINE, MINE!", "I can't help it. I'm a greedy slob. It's my hobby!" and the ever-popular "Hassan CHOP!!!", among many others)

I have to agree with you on both counts here, Dargo.

We've had mutual agreement in the past about the hilarity of Ali Baba Bunny, one of the last outstanding Looney Tunes, in my opinion, with Daffy's performance stealing the show . . .

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"That's RIGHT, rabbit! I'm gonna steal this cartoon right out from underneath those dumb floppy ears of your's!"

. . . but it was later in life, long after my cartoon watching kid years, that I came to appreciate the wild slapstick hilarity of Tex Avery's cartoons, particularly once he moved from Warners to MGM. There was the "girl" and "wolf" series, such as Red Hot Riding Hood cigarjoe posted above, along with Swing Shift Cinderella and Little Rural Riding Hood.

Screwy Squirrel was really the only defined character that Avery created in six (or was it seven?) cartoons. But the wild physically abusive Screwy (funny as I find those cartoons to be) didn't really catch on with the public.

Avery's cartoons are wild laugh fests, among them such memorable one shot outings as Slap Happy Lion, Bad Luck B l a c k i e, Little Tinker (with its Sinatra parody) and even a parody of mystery thrillers with Who Killed Who? But if I had to single out one Avery cartoon as probably my favourite I think that King Size Canary, a story of one upmanship taken to on top of the world extremes, may well be it. Avery just keeps topping himself in this one.

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