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things to come (1936)


NipkowDisc
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I've always have found things to come to be an astounding visual treat for the eyes. this has been colorized and given the choice of black & white or color, color should be the choice.
why? because it makes things to come that more astounding and enjoyable.
so get on the bandwagon and support color...

"what has another day to offer you, timonides?" -marcus aurelius
"warmth, life, color." -timonides

and guess who speaks in support of colorization in the intro to the colorized Things To Come...
someone who tcm has unceasingly heaped praise after praise upon...
the great RAY HARRYHAUSEN!
"well that's the whole case!" - lee j. cobb, twelve angry men

:)

"which shall it be?"

Image result for raymond massey things to come

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What really blows me away in the movie is not did it predicted TV but 16 X 9 HD television! :huh: :o

Could be watching a classic movie on TCM since it's in B&W.  Wonder does the guy complain about aspect ratios.

d0fe68921a7839718358db0997fc1f96.jpg

 

Didn't have to wait until 2036!  

white-wooden-tv-cabinet.jpg?s=pi

Edited by hamradio
Left out "me"...my bad.
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36 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

I beliveve television was around in 1936. The real qusstion is, did H. G. Wells have it in his book?

They were experimenting / developing electronic television here during the 30's but a standard couldn't be set. (history repeated during the 1990's with HD :angry:)  One station operated in New York, broadcasting FDR.

broadcast-television-tv-sets-receiver-by

 

 Europe was ahead of us, especially the UK and Germany.

Camera used during the 1936 Berlin Olympics

1936.jpg

 

 

 

 

There was a system developed during the 1920's called Baird.  It's more mechanical but it actually worked to a degree.

 

Edited by hamradio
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4 hours ago, hamradio said:

They were experimenting / developing electronic television here during the 30's but a standard couldn't be set. (history repeated during the 1990's with HD :angry:)  One station operated in New York, broadcasting FDR.

broadcast-television-tv-sets-receiver-by

 

 Europe was ahead of us, especially the UK and Germany.

Camera used during the 1936 Berlin Olympics

1936.jpg

 

 

 

 

There was a system developed during the 1920's called Baird.  It's more mechanical but it actually worked to a degree.

 

the Baird Televisor employed a neon tube.

 

 

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8 hours ago, hamradio said:

What really blows away in the movie is not did it predicted TV but 16 X 9 HD television! :huh: :o

Could be watching a classic movie on TCM since it's in B&W.  Wonder does the guy complain about aspect ratios.

d0fe68921a7839718358db0997fc1f96.jpg

 

Didn't have to wait until 2036!  

white-wooden-tv-cabinet.jpg?s=pi

Meh...  16:9 is just 4:3 squared, definitely in the league of sci-fi.  :P

The only question is why did they stop there.

P.S. It looks like they adapted those Neumann/Telefunken bottle mics on the TV cameras with directional tubes (pressure columns), if I am seeing that correctly.  Looks like it could be an early go at a shotgun mic, if not something different altogether, such as part of the camera.

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All that jibber-jabber aside, what always grabbed me was that in a movie made in 1936, it's story begins in 1940, and a world war is feared to be coming.  Four years BEFORE WWII started to become a reality.  That they still fought wars with BIPLANES is a not forward looking glitch.  Foretelling the advent of television aside, that they were still flying in propeller planes showed a lack of sci-fi ingenuity too.

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

All that jibber-jabber aside, what always grabbed me was that in a movie made in 1936, it's story begins in 1940, and a world war is feared to be coming.  Four years BEFORE WWII started to become a reality.  That they still fought wars with BIPLANES is a not forward looking glitch.  Foretelling the advent of television aside, that they were still flying in propeller planes showed a lack of sci-fi ingenuity too.

Sepiatone

Back then many thought the future of air travel would had been air ships.  Flying hotels, hospitals :blink:, etc.

American-Magazine-web-2000.jpg

 

tuberculosis-airship-clinic-web.jpg

One did envision space travel back in the '30's, see how that turned out. :lol:

e9d906486453c4107595cacf658fbfd1.jpg

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6 hours ago, hamradio said:

Back then many thought the future of air travel would had been air ships.  Flying hotels, hospitals :blink:, etc.

American-Magazine-web-2000.jpg

 

tuberculosis-airship-clinic-web.jpg

One did envision space travel back in the '30's, see how that turned out. :lol:

e9d906486453c4107595cacf658fbfd1.jpg

spark-propelled.

:)

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4 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

You mean SPARKLER propelled, don'tcha?  ;)

Sepiatone

A very noisy sparkler at that.  Strange how the sci fi writers during the 1930's thought the Earth's atmosphere went up and on forever even though photos from stratosphere balloons clearly show it thinning out.

 

Explorer II high-altitude balloon. Historical image of the Explorer II high-altitude balloon during its flight. Explorer II was a manned balloon launched on 11th November 1935. It reached a record altitude of 22,066 metres and carried a two man crew inside a sealed spherical gondola. 

C0245809-Explorer_II_high-altitude_ballo

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10 hours ago, hamradio said:

A very noisy sparkler at that.  Strange how the sci fi writers during the 1930's thought the Earth's atmosphere went up and on forever even though photos from stratosphere balloons clearly show it thinning out.

 

Explorer II high-altitude balloon. Historical image of the Explorer II high-altitude balloon during its flight. Explorer II was a manned balloon launched on 11th November 1935. It reached a record altitude of 22,066 metres and carried a two man crew inside a sealed spherical gondola. 

C0245809-Explorer_II_high-altitude_ballo

Hey--waiiiiitaminit.  How did they get that picture?

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