Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

A Blueprint for Murder


jh53
 Share

Recommended Posts

44 minutes ago, jh53 said:

Sorry if this has been posted.  I’m late to the forum.  Seems like I’ve seen this movie on TCM before yet they are saying it’s a premiere.  Under another name maybe?

To my knowledge and as stated “A Blueprint for Murder” (1953) was indeed a TCM premiere.

“I didn’t care about the movies really…I was tall, could talk and it was easy to do” – Joseph Cotten

“Orson Welles cites “Citizen Kane” as his best film, Alfred Hitchcock “Shadow of a Doubt” and Carol Reed “The Third Man” – and I am in all of them along with many others and never received an academy award nomination. :blink:💋

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This film had a few suspenseful moments, but the idea of one character intentionally poisoning another in order to elicit a confession is ludicrous. Maybe in the 1950s this was considered acceptable behavior.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, scsu1975 said:

This film had a few suspenseful moments, but the idea of one character intentionally poisoning another in order to elicit a confession is ludicrous. Maybe in the 1950s this was considered acceptable behavior.

I've come across accounts of something similar that happened in recent years, where a representative of Monsanto claimed Round-Up weed killer (Glyphosate) was safe to have in the drinking water.  In response, a glass of water was produced, then some Round-Up poured into it.  He refused to drink it.  Question answered.

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even with a not so plausible ending, A Blueprint for Murder could have been more interesting with a better director. It has affinities with Suspicion and Notorious. The story ought to be noir--the murder of a child is very dark--but there's a complete absence of noir style, probably because Andrew Stone is a writer rather than a director. In fact, the film looks like television, rather like Fritz Lang's Beyond a Reasonable Doubt.

Though it's good to have this premiere, to honor Gary Merrill, who had a very small role in A Blueprint for Murder, I wish another film had been chosen, perhaps Phone Call from a Stranger or Another Man's Poison or Twelve O'Clock High.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Even with a not so plausible ending, A Blueprint for Murder could have been more interesting with a better director. It has affinities with Suspicion and Notorious. The story ought to be noir--the murder of a child is very dark--but there's a complete absence of noir style, probably because Andrew Stone is a writer rather than a director. In fact, the film looks like television, rather like Fritz Lang's Beyond a Reasonable Doubt.

Though it's good to have this premiere, to honor Gary Merrill, who had a very small role in A Blueprint for Murder, I wish another film had been chosen, perhaps Phone Call from a Stranger or Another Man's Poison or Twelve O'Clock High.

Yes, I would have chosen PHONE CALL FROM A STRANGER, since his role is more integral to the story. He also has more to do in WITNESS TO MURDER.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rather standard fare. At around 77 minutes I don't feel I lost a whole lot of time.

The cruise ship setting during the last part of the flick was slightly reminiscent of

Dangerous Crossing. Couldn't recall if Jean Peters was in that one, but it was

Jeanne Crain. Can't go wrong either way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...