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Architecture in classic films


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Not sure if we've had a thread about this before.

I am watching MURDER ON A BRIDLE PATH (1936). It's one of the Hildegarde Withers mysteries, starring Helen Broderick and James Gleason.

A murder victim's body was dragged from his bedroom to the turret room. I had no idea what a turret room was, so I had to look it up.

Google says it's a "little tower" usually on a corner or angle. 

Screen Shot 2019-06-03 at 6.53.06 PM.jpeg

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1 hour ago, TopBilled said:

Not sure if we've had a thread about this before.

I am watching MURDER ON A BRIDLE PATH (1936). It's one of the Hildegarde Withers mysteries, starring Helen Broderick and James Gleason.

A murder victim's body was dragged from his bedroom to the turret room. I had no idea what a turret room was, so I had to look it up.

Google says it's a "little tower" usually on a corner or angle. 

Screen Shot 2019-06-03 at 6.53.06 PM.jpeg

like Collinwood on Dark Shadows.

:)Image result for collinwood tower

 

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I never heard that term, either.

I was watching Indiscreet on YouTube last night. In Ingrid Bergman's kitchen, she has no free-standing table but a little alcove with booth-like seats on either side of a tabletop that's possibly connected to the wall. Like a booth in a diner, but the booth-seats only wide enough to seat one person on each side of the table. It looked super-cozy, and I kinda wish I had one in my kitchen! Although it was so small, I feel like Bergman and Cary Grant's knees must haven been bumping against each other underneath the table. 

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8 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

a little alcove with booth-like seats on either side of a tabletop

That's called an "inglenook". Originally seats near a fireplace, but I've seen inglenooks in back door entrances and in kitchen alcoves with a table:

2db6fa26e6c6ea16e0f551ed1f1f7c13.jpg

I've salvaged inglenook booths from old houses when they've "renovated" (people are dumbasses)

A "turret" room refers to the "tower" shape, originally used for shooting enemy in 135º from a castle. This was later popularized in Queen Anne Victorian style houses:

ferndale-2010-037.jpg

My favorite room in my old house is the "Parlor". When my great grandmother died she was was laid out in the living room (where I watch movies) under a 6 foot long window because "the parlor" was too small! I already have it stipulated in my will to be laid out in the parlor, if granted a wake.

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Those( I think) are called "nooks".  My wife and I once rented a house with one and they are nice.  ;) 

I always liked(and still do) those homes in classic movies that have a small "step-down" from the front door "foyer" to the rest of the house.  Never lived in one of those kind of places.  The house we lived in when I was 12-18 had a situation where to go from the front door to the rest ofthe house called for going UP a short step.

(Tiki beat me TWO seconds in posting  :D 

Sepiatone

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Thanks for the replies on the thread. I think this is an interesting topic and hopefully we can add to it as we go along. 

Perhaps one of the most famous examples of architecture in classic film:

Screen Shot 2019-06-05 at 3.18.18 PM.jpeg

Charles Foster Kane's estate Xanadu in CITIZEN KANE.

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Some nice buildings in the film TCM just showed;  A Yank at Oxford.

Of course films set in Italy have nice architecture;  E.g.  Light in the Piazza,   Roman Holiday,  3 Coins in a Fountain,  and even Gidget Goes to Rome.

Just got back from there and nice as always,  but I recommend Austria as a must-see country.

 

 

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On 6/5/2019 at 3:19 PM, TopBilled said:

Thanks for the replies on the thread. I think this is an interesting topic and hopefully we can add to it as we go along. 

Perhaps one of the most famous examples of architecture in classic film:

Screen Shot 2019-06-05 at 3.18.18 PM.jpeg

Charles Foster Kane's estate Xanadu in CITIZEN KANE.

Actually TB, I'm pretty sure the pic you posted above is not the facade of Kane's Xanadu in the film, but is in fact the facade of the estate located in San Simeon CA and which was owned by the man upon whom Orson Welles would base his film's story...a citizen named William Randolph Hearst. Yep, I'm pretty sure that that's a pic of Hearst Castle.

The following pic would be, as far as I know, the only reasonably close-up camera shot of this kind used in the film itself (and a scale model and/or matte painting) of the facade of character Charles Foster Kane's Xanadu...

xanadu_smoke_citizenkane.png

 

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Now, HERE'S ya a warm and inviting little abode that's featured in a 1963 flick of some repute...

The+haunting+1963.jpeg

After "Zillowing" its location, it said all the furnishings, and a few "other things" in it, are included in its sale price!

(...naaah, jus' kiddin' of course...couldn't resist)

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7 hours ago, Dargo said:

The following pic would be, as far as I know, the only reasonably close-up camera shot of this kind used in the film itself (and a scale model and/or matte painting) of the facade of character Charles Foster Kane's Xanadu...

xanadu_smoke_citizenkane.png

 

 

Um well, kind of. I'm thinking that picture (or painting) would not be depicting Xanadu the house, but the Xanadu's crematory. The trail of smoke implies the burning of Kane's body.

I was delighted to discover the traditional idea that large estates not only often contained a "final resting place" or mausoleum for the family's internment, but sometimes had a morgue and crematory right on the property. I'd venture to guess judging by the plain, but Gothic appearance, this is the case. Most likely, this building also houses a private chapel for a funeral.

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9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

 

Um well, kind of. I'm thinking that picture (or painting) would not be depicting Xanadu the house, but the Xanadu's crematory. The trail of smoke implies the burning of Kane's body.

I was delighted to discover the traditional idea that large estates not only often contained a "final resting place" or mausoleum for the family's internment, but sometimes had a morgue and crematory right on the property. I'd venture to guess judging by the plain, but Gothic appearance, this is the case. Most likely, this building also houses a private chapel for a funeral.

Actually Tiki, unless they were planning on burning Charley Kane's mortal coil along with his little sled, I'm pretty sure that smoke you see in that final shot of this film was supposed to be emanating from that scene in the basement of Xanadu and where the workmen are busy throwing objects which they believe would have no particular monetary value into Xanadu's trash incinerator...not "crematorium".

(...and with this symbolism of Charley's possessions going up in smoke implying those old saws of, "You can't take it with you" and "Possessions are a pale substitute for the love that one has earned from others during their life")

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Guess I might as well bring the following up before somebody else does here...

Is James Mason's cantilevered Mid-Century Modern house that's (supposedly, but not really) located on the ridge just above that enormous chiseled-from-granite National Monument in South Dakota, COOL AS ALL HELL OR WHAT???!!!

(...like I said, somebody was gonna eventually mention this in this thread, and so why not ME?!)  ;)

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14 hours ago, Dargo said:

Guess I might as well bring the following up before somebody else does here...

Is James Mason's cantilevered Mid-Century Modern house that's (supposedly, but not really) located on the ridge just above that enormous chiseled-from-granite National Monument in South Dakota, COOL AS ALL HELL OR WHAT???!!!

(...like I said, somebody was gonna eventually mention this in this thread, and so why not ME?!)  ;)

Well now, DARG......

How often have I brought that house up in these forums?  ;)

Sepiatone

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14 hours ago, Dargo said:

I'm pretty sure that smoke you see in that final shot of this film was supposed to be emanating from that scene in the basement of Xanadu and where the workmen are busy throwing objects which they believe would have no particular monetary value into Xanadu's trash incinerator...not "crematorium".

(slaps head) of COURSE you're correct!

If not a morgue/chapel, could that building be a warehouse/garage sort of out building?

Surely, Xanadu would not have that "plain" of a façade. I recall shots of Xanadu's main building looking more Baroque/Gothic.

CK+22.jpg

This is the only painting I could find of the exterior. Looks like that "smoke" shot could have been the back of the building as earlier suggested.

14 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Screen Shot 2019-06-07 at 2.19.35 PM.jpeg

That house, and the N by NW house are obviously both influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright who finally gained public favor in the 50's with his Fallingwater house. His early (Prairie) work was universally dismissed and not really accepted until the 50's

How about the FLW home used in '59's HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL (bigger pics available):

th?id=OIP.fPgqmIumln-ZdmD7vwiy9AHaFj&pid

I love that it's not your typical Gothic/Victorian haunted house and in a few interior shots you catch a glimpse of the "Aztec" design blocks. 

 

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I believe that any discussion of architecture in movies must include mention of the Bradbury Building.

XyQ0tu9.jpg

There are eighty-three movies and television episodes which used this for location filming listed on imbd.com. They range from: China Girl (1942) to Pushing Daisies (2007–2009). I feel it is only fitting that the building might be listed "appearing as itself" in the documentary: Los Angeles Plays Itself (2003).

My favorite movies in which it appears are: The Unfaithful (1947), D.O.A. (1949), M (1951), Marlowe (1969), Chinatown (1974) and Blade Runner (1982).  

 

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

...

That house, and the N by NW house are obviously both influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright who finally gained public favor in the 50's with his Fallingwater house. His early (Prairie) work was universally dismissed and not really accepted until the 50's

How about the FLW home used in '59's HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL (bigger pics available):

th?id=OIP.fPgqmIumln-ZdmD7vwiy9AHaFj&pid

I love that it's not your typical Gothic/Victorian haunted house and in a few interior shots you catch a glimpse of the "Aztec" design blocks. 

 

Another Frank Lloyd Wright designed structure is one I used to take art classes in as a teenager back in the late-'60s...the so-called "Hollyhock House" located atop a hill in the eastern area of Hollywood, and which was commissioned by oil heiress Aline Barnsdall and completed in 1921. Disillusioned by the costs of construction and maintenance, Barnsdall donated the house to the city of Los Angeles in 1927 and has since been operated by that city's Parks Dept.

HollyhockHouse-primary1.jpg.653x0_q80_cr

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollyhock_House

(...and in keeping with the intent of this thread...the only movie I could find which was ever filmed here would be that 1989 "classic" starring Bill Maher, Shannon Tweed and Adrienne Barbeau titled, Cannibal Women in the Avocado Jungle of Death)

 

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20 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I wish I could find a better photo, but this is the house featured in THE SECOND WOMAN (1950) starring Robert Young.

Screen Shot 2019-06-07 at 2.19.35 PM.jpeg

 I've got the DVD of this movie. It's the most interesting thing that Betsy Drake did. I don't believe I've ever seen any mention of it.

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