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?? WOODSTOCK?


Sepiatone
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Why not?  Anyway, no doubt in tune(no pun intent) with the upcoming 50th anniversary of the historic 1969 music festival, TCM will show the "director's cut" of the documentary. Personally.......

I think what I'd prefer is to gather together ALL the footage shot of ALL the acts that performed and splice it all together.  This may take up so much time that it may have to be a day or two presentation on PBS.  

At least we'd all get to see, along with the ones we're more familiar with( documentary-wise) THESE well loved but absent from the original release performances from "counterculture" favorites...

and....

There's others left out of the film, but no time for me to look 'em up.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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I don't know how much of that film footage is available, but there is a massive box set coming out containing the most complete audio record of the event ever. 38 CDs containing 425 songs arranged in order of performance, 267 of which have never before been officially released, including for the first time ever the complete sets of the Grateful Dead, the Band and Credence Clearwater Revival. It's only $800!

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Woodstock?

Farm Aid had a broader & deeper lineup honey. 💋

 

September 22, 1985 Farm Aid Champaign, Illinois Memorial Stadium

1.   Alabama

2.   Hoyt Axton

3.   The Beach Boys

4.   The Blasters

5.   Bon Jovi

6.   Jimmy Buffett

7.   Glen Campbell

8.   Johnny Cash

9.   David Allan Coe

10.                John Conlee

11.                Charlie Daniels Band

12.                John Denver

13.                Bob Dylan

14.                John Fogerty

15.                Foreigner

16.                Vince Gill

17.                Vern Gosdin

18.                Ario Guthrie

19.                Sammy Hagar

20.                Merle Haggard

21.                Daryl Hall

22.                Emmylou Harris

23.                Don Henley

24.                Waylon Jennings

25.                Billy Joel

26.                Randy Newman

27.                George Jones

28.                Rickie Lee Jones

29.                B.B. King

30.                Carole King

31.                Kris Krisofferson

32.                Huey Lewis

33.                Loretta Lynn

34.                Roger McGuinn

35.                John Mellencamp

36.                Roger Miller

37.                Joni Mitchell

38.                Nitty Gritty Dirt Band

39.                Willie Nelson

40.                Roy Orbison

41.                Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

42.                Charlie Pride

43.                Bonnie Raitt

44.                Lou Reed

45.                Kenny Rogers

46.                Brian Setzer

47.                Sissy Spacek

48.                Tanya Tucker

49.                Eddie Van Halen

50.                Debra Winger

51.                Neil Young

52.                Dave Milsap

53.                Joe Ely

54.                Judy Rodman

55.                X

 

Woodstock August 15-18 1969 Yasgur’s Farm New York

1.   Richie Havens

2.   Swami Satchidananda

3.   Sweetwater

4.   Bert Sommer

5.   Tim Hardin

6.   Ravi Shankar

7.   Melanie

8.   Ario Guthrie

9.   Joan Baez

10.                Quill

11.                Country Joe McDonald

12.                Santana

13.                John Sabastian

14.                Keef Hartley Band

15.                The Incredible String Band

16.                Canned Heat

17.                Mountain

18.                Grateful Dead

19.                Creedence Clearwater Revival

20.                Janis Joplin with The Kozmic Blues Band

21.                Sly and the Family Stone

22.                The Who

23.                Jefferson Airplane

24.                Joe Cocker and the Grease Band

25.                Country Joe and the Fish

26.                Ten Years After

27.                The Band

28.                Johnny Winter

29.                Blood, Sweat & Tears

30.                Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young

31.                Paul Butterfield Blues Band

32.                Sha Na Na

33.                Jimi Hendrix / Gypsy Sun & Rainbows

 

👣

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5 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Why not?  Anyway, no doubt in tune(no pun intent) with the upcoming 50th anniversary of the historic 1969 music festival, TCM will show the "director's cut" of the documentary. Personally.......

It's a Warner film (one of their "core" promoted 70's titles for obvious reasons), and considered one of the great rockumentaries of the 70's, so that's a no brainer.

If it was good enough for Charlton Heston, it's good enough for TCM:

 

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There are a lot of great mega-concerts that are at least partially available to view. The T.A.M.I. Show, Monterey, Woodstock, Live Aid. If there's any collection of the aforementioned Farm Aid in its entirety, I'm unaware, but that would be worthy also.

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10 hours ago, JeanneCrain said:

Woodstock August 15-18 1969 Yasgur’s Farm New York

32.                Sha Na Na👣

Yes, BION, 50's music was just starting to enjoy a renaissance with the Woodstock crowd, near the end of the Psychedelic era, a good four years before "American Graffiti".

It's that fifteen-to-twenty year cultural gap, not to mention that Jerry Lee Lewis still rocks harder than Jimi Hendrix.  😎

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Woodstock was unique in that it was the first rock'n'roll "festival" to not use an already established venue, but created it's OWN venue.  Besides, the point here isn't which "festival" was better or anyone liked better than another, but Woodstock, with the largest attendance of them, is coming up on it's 50th anniversary.  AND too, was about MUCH more than the music.  And anyway.....

Some other artists I'd like to have seen in the doc over some others.....

 

 

Sepiatone

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I was a lieutenant in Vietnam in 1971 and borrowed a tape of Woodstock recording from an enlisted man to record.  I had two recorders set up on a table in officers "hooch."  There were a couple of majors who lived there.  When Country Joe and the Fish came on with the "Fish Cheer" song, they both came out and asked if they were hearing correctly.  [For those who may not know, the word started with F, but was not Fish.] I told them they were.  They didn't say anything, just went back to their rooms. 

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On 6/4/2019 at 10:19 AM, EricJ said:

It's a Warner film (one of their "core" promoted 70's titles for obvious reasons), and considered one of the great rockumentaries of the 70's, so that's a no brainer.

If it was good enough for Charlton Heston, it's good enough for TCM:

 

 A child of THE OMEGA MAN, my son would probably choose the '71 take on I AM LEGEND as his TCM guest host movie for its sampling of "woodstock" as well...

 Alicia Malone's hand gesture in her pre-screening talk, according to my aforementioned, would've been far better suited to Penelope Spheeris' "THE DECLINE..." film, The Metal Years

 Also from my son...

 Chasing Woodstock: However expansive the name drop for Farm Aid, the sounds and vibe still echo from that Bethel bowl on Max Yasgur's dairy farm fifty years later in a way that no other music festival seems to have ever transcended.

Edited by SherNo
A late Addition
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On 6/4/2019 at 10:13 PM, sewhite2000 said:

There are a lot of great mega-concerts that are at least partially available to view. The T.A.M.I. Show, Monterey, Woodstock, Live Aid. If there's any collection of the aforementioned Farm Aid in its entirety, I'm unaware, but that would be worthy also.

Gray market can be the way to go for those sorts of things, though I like official versions just because they tend to be better quality - and in certain yet dwindling circumstances they can support the original artist and/or restoration efforts.  Got a gray market DVD of the TAMI show, back before there was a Youtube or TCM was airing this sort of stuff.

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On 6/4/2019 at 7:49 AM, Sepiatone said:

Why not?  Anyway, no doubt in tune(no pun intent) with the upcoming 50th anniversary of the historic 1969 music festival, TCM will show the "director's cut" of the documentary. Personally.......

I think what I'd prefer is to gather together ALL the footage shot of ALL the acts that performed and splice it all together.  This may take up so much time that it may have to be a day or two presentation on PBS.  

At least we'd all get to see, along with the ones we're more familiar with( documentary-wise) THESE well loved but absent from the original release performances from "counterculture" favorites...

and....

There's others left out of the film, but no time for me to look 'em up.  ;) 

Sepiatone

Yeah nothing against TCM but I think PBS could do a full-length festival more justice.  Did that all get filmed?

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15 hours ago, MovieCollectorOH said:

Yeah nothing against TCM but I think PBS could do a full-length festival more justice.  Did that all get filmed?

Yeah, my understanding being all who performed there had SOME footage taken, if not all their set filmed.  

And in agreement I'd say that PBS was the first TV station I saw the documentary on.  During the event's 10th anniversary.  You know...  1979, before my area had cable, and before commercial availability of home video and home video cassette players.  ;) 

I'm still kinda surprised TCM showed this documentary during "prime time", and not in the wee hours as part of their "TCM underground" series.

Sepiatone

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17 hours ago, TheCid said:

I was a lieutenant in Vietnam in 1971 and borrowed a tape of Woodstock

Heh, my bf at the time was also in the military and was brought out to Woodstock for "security/peace" officer. His picture is on the inside album cover.

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And anyway too.... this wasn't ANY attempt to raise a discussion about "rockumentaries" in general, or music festivals that followed or preceded Woodstock.  So....

Last night I put on my VHS of the "director's cut"( which gives me a more screen filling aspect than the DVD) for my daughter(who's seen the movie before) and the man currently in her life( nice guy, MUCH less a n a l than her ex husband) who never has, and was unfamiliar with the whole history of the festival and most of the artists who performed.  Needless to say, he was surprised by those who he WAS familiar with, like CARLOS SANTANA, who HE first heard of when Carlos did that tune with ROB THOMAS, by how young he looked, and how great his drummer (MIKE SHRIEVE) played that solo.  And too, he's NEVER seen JOE COCKER perform before and was amused by his "iconic" histrionics, which rose "air guitar" to an ART FORM!  ;)  :D 

 

He said he liked TEN YEARS AFTER and RITCHIE HAVENS too, both whom he's also never heard of before.  

My daughter quipped that he probably most enjoyed all the female nudity in the flick.  ;)

Sepiatone

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51 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I bought the three LP version a while after it came out. I think someone stole it somewhere

along the way, maybe Abbie Hoffman. 

My friend got me the book Steal This Book.    He was a clueless stoner but while in the local library saw the book and did as he was told!   Since I was more into the protest movement I was well aware of Hoffman, so I was happy to get the book.     I also had a Hoffman comedy album.    Played that thing until it died (well when the parents were out).      

Also,  I meet David Dellinger,  another member of the Chicago Seven,  and close friend of Abbie, at a hotel bar the night after Abbie was said to have committed suicide.    I got him a few drinks and he talked and talked;  He said he had talked to Abbie the day before and Abbie wasn't depressed.    Dave claimed the FBI or some other US government group did-Abbie-in  (thanks Ms. Doolittle).     

Wiki confirms my odd encounter with David (before he made such claims to the press,  since when I meet him he had just come from the Airport to the hotel).  "Among the more vocal doubters at the service today was Mr. Dellinger, who said, 'I don't believe for one moment the suicide thing.' He said he had been in fairly frequent touch with Mr. Hoffman, who had 'numerous plans for the future.'" Yet the same New York Times article reported that the coroner found the residue of about 150 pills and quoted the coroner in a telephone interview saying "There is no way to take that amount of phenobarbital without intent. It was intentional and self-inflicted."[41]

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3 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

My friend got me the book Steal This Book.    He was a clueless stoner but while in the local library saw the book and did as he was told!   Since I was more into the protest movement I was well aware of Hoffman, so I was happy to get the book.     I also had a Hoffman comedy album.    Played that thing until it died (well when the parents were out).      

Also,  I meet David Dellinger,  another member of the Chicago Seven,  and close friend of Abbie, at a hotel bar the night after Abbie was said to have committed suicide.    I got him a few drinks and he talked and talked;  He said he had talked to Abbie the day before and Abbie wasn't depressed.    Dave claimed the FBI or some other US government group did-Abbie-in  (thanks Ms. Doolittle).     

Wiki confirms my odd encounter with David (before he made such claims to the press,  since when I meet him he had just come from the Airport to the hotel).  "Among the more vocal doubters at the service today was Mr. Dellinger, who said, 'I don't believe for one moment the suicide thing.' He said he had been in fairly frequent touch with Mr. Hoffman, who had 'numerous plans for the future.'" Yet the same New York Times article reported that the coroner found the residue of about 150 pills and quoted the coroner in a telephone interview saying "There is no way to take that amount of phenobarbital without intent. It was intentional and self-inflicted."[41]

I stole a book or two back in the day when the security at mall book stores was pretty primitive,

though Steal This Book was not one of them. I wasn't that interested and I only took paperbacks.

I doubt the gov't knocked Hoffman off, though their general paranoia about leftists is well known.

On a more humorous note there was Hoffman's encounter at Woodstock with Pete Townshend.

Hoffman got up on the stage and got the mic and started a political speech and Townshend

kicked him off the stage. No substitute. 

 

 

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