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Director Franco Zeffirelli dies at 96 - Italy media


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2 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

The Doctor was one of four feature films directed by Randa Haines, who mostly worked in television. Her other three were Children of a Lesser God (also with Hurt), Wrestling with Ernest Hemmingway and Dance with Me. For whatever reason, she didn't get the attention one of the few other female directors of the era - Penny Marshall - got. Maybe because she didn't play Laverne.

The Doctor also came out within a short space of Regarding Henry (1991), with Harrison Ford as a high-powered executive who recovers from a brain injury with a new post-amnesiac innocence and thinks, "Gee, I was that?", and Doc Hollywood (1991), where rich-obnoxious Lightning McQueen Michael J. Fox strands his car in Radiator Springs a small town, and has to settle in for a few weeks of quirky, charming small-town community service, that'll show 'im.

At that point, audiences and critics lumped all three movies together into an annoying "trend" of wishful fantasies of Punishing the Bad People--near the end of the Reagan/GHWBush era and with 90's Clinton populism on the rise--and were seen as modern-day early-40's "You Can't Take It With You" Capra-corn, only with more preaching and less Jimmy Stewart/Bing Crosby.

(And whew, I kept reading these two pages of William Hurt/Jane Eyre thread-drift--including the entire B.O. chart for 1991--and thinking "Zefirelli directed 'The Doctor'??  I knew he did 'The Champ' and 'Endless Love', but I didn't know he was THAT corny away from Shakespeare and opera!"  😄 )

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And regarding Maureen O'Hara, she had something in her autobiography that was eye-opening. She said she had several family members (maybe some friends too) who thought she might have a chance for a nomination for Only the Lonely. She was mostly out of the Hollywood scene by this point, and hadn't lived there for about 20 years. She calls up Roddy McDowell, good friend of hers from way back and the president of the Academy's acting branch at the time. She asked him for advise as to whether she should invest in a campaign, and he told her that there was some enemy of hers that had poisoned any chance of her getting any sort of nomination. He told her that he would tell her if she came out to LA who it was, but she didn't make it to LA for 7 years, ironically on the day McDowell died. She never found out who her enemy was.

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21 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

And regarding Maureen O'Hara, she had something in her autobiography that was eye-opening. She said she had several family members (maybe some friends too) who thought she might have a chance for a nomination for Only the Lonely. She was mostly out of the Hollywood scene by this point, and hadn't lived there for about 20 years. She calls up Roddy McDowell, good friend of hers from way back and the president of the Academy's acting branch at the time. She asked him for advise as to whether she should invest in a campaign, and he told her that there was some enemy of hers that had poisoned any chance of her getting any sort of nomination. He told her that he would tell her if she came out to LA who it was, but she didn't make it to LA for 7 years, ironically on the day McDowell died. She never found out who her enemy was.

Proving how political the process is. And how it is often not about talent or who should really be nominated/recognized.

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30 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

And regarding Maureen O'Hara, she had something in her autobiography that was eye-opening. She said she had several family members (maybe some friends too) who thought she might have a chance for a nomination for Only the Lonely. She was mostly out of the Hollywood scene by this point, and hadn't lived there for about 20 years. She calls up Roddy McDowell, good friend of hers from way back and the president of the Academy's acting branch at the time. She asked him for advise as to whether she should invest in a campaign, and he told her that there was some enemy of hers that had poisoned any chance of her getting any sort of nomination. He told her that he would tell her if she came out to LA who it was, but she didn't make it to LA for 7 years, ironically on the day McDowell died. She never found out who her enemy was.

Yes, I read her memoirs and remember her writing about that. She contacted him about whether she should mount a campaign to get a nomination and he told her not to bother, that she'd never be nominated. I couldn't exactly remember what his reasons were, think they were rather vague but she never found out because he died before she found out why. So she never mounted a campaign.

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2 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Yes, I read her memoirs and remember her writing about that. She contacted him about whether she should mount a campaign to get a nomination and he told her not to bother, that she'd never be nominated. I couldn't exactly remember what his reasons were, think they were rather vague but she never found out because he died before she found out why. So she never mounted a campaign.

Sounds like she let the process defeat her. Mounting a campaign might not have resulted in a nomination, but it could have given her more visibility and led to another important film or TV role if she was seeking that.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I watched half of his Jesus of Nazareth mini-series last night. Gonna watch the rest tonight.

I hadn't seen it since it was on TV the first time. That Robert Powell sure looks terrific in the lead role, doesn't he? Resembles the usual artwork depictions of Christ beautifully.

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1 hour ago, BrownShoes said:

I watched half of his Jesus of Nazareth mini-series last night. Gonna watch the rest tonight.

I hadn't seen it since it was on TV the first time. That Robert Powell sure looks terrific in the lead role, doesn't he? Resembles the usual artwork depictions of Christ beautifully.

That is my favorite telling of the Christ story by a long shot. Robert Powell is great in it. I believe he never blinks his eyes throughout. No clue how he managed that.

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