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The Looney Tunes Are Back: Watch The New Bugs Bunny Cartoon


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https://www.forbes.com/sites/tonifitzgerald/2019/06/12/the-looney-tunes-are-back-watch-the-new-bugs-bunny-cartoon/#312af64a18de

Image shows Elmer Fudd whacking at Bugs Bunny with an axe.

Bugs Bunny avoids the axe chop by Elmer Fudd in a new cartoon. 

WARNER BROS. ANIMATION

Get ready for anvils, axes and wascally wabbits galore. The Looney Tunes crew is officially back, and on Wednesday their first video in a new series rolled out at the Annecy International Animation Film Festival, where earlier this week Disney made headlines by confirming a Chip 'N Dale reboot for its new streaming platform.

Warner Bros. Animation (WBA) had announced the new 'toons were cominglast month, but Wednesday marked the first time any footage had been released.

The new series will feature all the old favorites from the Looney Tunes heyday, including Bugs Bunny, who stars in the first short, naturally. He's pursued by Elmer Fudd in "Dynamite Dance," which continues the WBA long-running obsession with dynamite and features clever, always violent interplay between the rabbit and the hunter set to a classical music background.

 

David Gemmill directed the short, which bowed in front of a standing room-only crowd at Annecy.

This first short is basically to whet everyone's appetite for the main event, which is 1,000 minutes of Looney Tunes action that will debut across digital, mobile and broadcast platforms. They're slated for release later this year.

All the classic characters will be in them, such as Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, Tweety, Sylvester and more.

Warner Bros. produced the original series of Looney Tunes cartoons from 1940 to 1969. Bugs Bunny, the shorts' trademark character, bowed in 1940and will celebrate his 80th birthday next year. He was originally voiced by Mel Blanc.

-I like that this one is closer in animation style to the original 1940s shorts. Very nice

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I heard about this the other day, and am cautiously optimistic. There's at least one whole generation, probably more than one generation whose fondest memory of Looney Tunes characters by a factor of infinity is Space Jam (shudder).

My favorite Looney Tunes cartoons have always been from the '50s, when some of the original anarchic spirit was lost, but the plots were extremely tight, and the gags never missed. What's Opera, Doc?, for example. I think modern writers probably couldn't recreate those very well, but this is the next best thing.

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Not only is animation style important, but story story story. I love the lush look of the original background paintings in 40's WB and esp MGM cartoons. The 50's graphics were transitional and by the 60's they had a cool mod look bordering on op art. I have a hard time warming up to digitally drawn graphics.

Another aspect that left me cold as ice was not having Joel Blanc as voice master. C'mon, the best voice box is available...all others just sound like ameteur imitators.

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Yep.  The animation method and the voices ARE important to lovers of Warner Bros. cartoons.  Or ANY 'toon producer...

I'd just HATE it if they brought back HECKLE and JECKLE  done in an ANIMANIACS art style.  or a PIXAR type CGI method.  Same goes for ROCKY and BULLWINKLE.  ;)

Sepiatone

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8 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

My favorite Looney Tunes cartoons have always been from the '50s, when some of the original anarchic spirit was lost, but the plots were extremely tight, and the gags never missed. What's Opera, Doc?, for example. I think modern writers probably couldn't recreate those very well, but this is the next best thing.

My favorites are from the same era as well. I especially enjoy the ones with Marvin in them. I hope this new series captures the feels of the 40s and 50s toons as well. I think the clip released looks decent enough.

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10 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

I heard about this the other day, and am cautiously optimistic. There's at least one whole generation, probably more than one generation whose fondest memory of Looney Tunes characters by a factor of infinity is Space Jam (shudder).

That's probably because Warner LITERALLY believes an entire generation "doesn't remember the Looneys" except for the presumed 90's-nostalgia of Space Jam.  (Of which any true Bugs/Chuck Jones fan believes should have every print thrown into a wood-chipper, and the pieces fed to rabid wolves.  😡 )

Warner, you see, doesn't get back on the horse easily after a bad retail-disk experience--They tried releasing the Looney Golden Collections on Blu-ray, but when audiences didn't buy the Complete Sniffles/Hubie & Bert Collection on Blu (yes), Warner's non-Archive retail-video department curled up into a fetal position in the corner, rocked back and forth, and wailed incoherently something about audiences "not liking Bugs Bunny anymore".

After a while, they did what Warner usually does in the wake of handling rejection, and tried to pitch the brand to the Target-Mart mainstream, with "Best-of" kiddy disks, streaming collections, and obnoxious new cartoons on Cartoon Network.  But Warner's feeling the Crunch now--where they have to find the New Warner Brand, with no more Harry Potter or Batman--and they're slowly, grudgingly, starting to make peace with all those Looney and Hanna-Barbera cartoons they were so mean to back in the 00's.

...Oh, and they want to do one more Space Jam.

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58 minutes ago, hamradio said:

Someone confiscate Elmer Fudds gun?

Elmer-Fudd-Picture-ngo9027.jpg

Good observation. Probably the depiction of firearms in material at least ostensibly aimed at children is not going to be permitted by WB corporate heads, to avoid societal criticism.

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Thing is, ever since Robert Zemeckis's shrieking, hyperactive, Tex Avery-centric idea of cartoons in "Who Framed Roger Rabbit?", that started the whole 'Boomer "Cartoon renaissance" of the late 80's and early 90's, there's been this backhanded idea that even the Chuck Jones cartoons were frenetic, hyperkinetic, and just blindingly plotless collections of Bugs dropping anvils on Elmer and handing him dynamite sticks in popcorn boxes.  ("Get it while it's hot, get it while it's buttered!")

There's no appreciation for the way Jones would time a cartoon, with just the right pauses and "help!" takes from the characters, that gave us the comically sympathetic smart-people-win sense that Jones' Bugs was a good rabbit pushed too far...And then, of course you know, that meant war.

Just like Disney's recent Mickey Mouse cartoons have turned into an ugly backhanded kitsch of what animators imagine the Steamboat Willie-era toons to have been, now Warner's animators seem to be jumping on some "retro" Wild Hare-era 1940 image of yellow-gloved Bugs and tomato-nosed Elmer.  The recent generation of animators literally don't seem to know whether they're paying tribute to the characters, or their childhood, or backhandedly snubbing either one, because the legacy embarrasses "their" profession.

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Considering how controversial the subject of gun violence is in society today, I would not be surprised if they don't include guns in the new shorts but keep in mind the official merchandise associated with the series does include the characters with their guns.

t shirt.jpg

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26 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Good observation. Probably the depiction of firearms in material at least ostensibly aimed at children is not going to be permitted by WB corporate heads, to avoid societal criticism.

Chopped to pieces by axe is more socially acceptable I guess.

 

ax-murderer_orig.jpg

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Blech, I just looked at those clips-the charactors move WAY TOO fast. My brain needs to register what my eyes have just seen. There's an elegance in the original cartoons timing missing from those new clips.

It's the charactors that are supposed to be hit over the head, not the viewers.

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6 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

Considering how controversial the subject of gun violence is in society today, I would not be surprised if they don't include guns in the new shorts but keep in mind the official merchandise associated with the series does include the characters with their guns.

 

Whaddya mean TODAY?   

Remember the computer "edited" version of ET in which the Fed's guns were changed to walkie-talkies:huh:

But I can understand their apprehension...  After all, it did get(years ago) to the point that TV stations had to voice warnings and disclaimers before the broadcasts of any THREE STOOGES shorts to let the kiddies know not to try the Stooges' stunts because some dumb kids actually WERE hitting each other with boards and poking each other's eyes out supposedly thinking because the STOOGES didn't really get hurt, they wouldn't either. :rolleyes: 

And too remember.... These are the days of the "non-threatening" Halloween decorations.  So, what else can they "spoil"?....Have the Coyote chase after the Road Runner with a plastic "squeaky" mallet?   Nerf bat, or what?

Sepiatone

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6 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Blech, I just looked at those clips-the charactors move WAY TOO fast. My brain needs to register what my eyes have just seen. There's an elegance in the original cartoons timing missing from those new clips.

It's the charactors that are supposed to be hit over the head, not the viewers.

I thought about mentioning that the movements are just too fast. that hyperkinetic bull started with the new wave of Disney animation starting with sheet like Aladdin. why so much speed? it seems to me that the speed is to cover up how truly lousy the animation and lame comedy is in today's cartoon sheet.

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13 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

I thought about mentioning that the movements are just too fast. that hyperkinetic bull started with the new wave of Disney animation starting with sheet like Aladdin. why so much speed? it seems to me that the speed is to cover up how truly lousy the animation and lame comedy is in today's cartoon sheet.

tenor.gif?itemid=7941598

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Disney's movement looked so fluid and natural because they upped the frames to (what?) 24 per second? MGM was that level as well with the Tom & Gerry's. I think the reason why they called it Termite Terrrace was because WB was low brow-animation at something like 18 frames per second. I think really low budget Bullwinkle & Hanna Barbara Sat AM cartoons were even lower resolution.

Anyone know specific numbers?

Just because we're no longer limited to "frames per second" why does bring animators to the conclusion s p a s t i c is better?

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Seems to me what made the classic W-B cartoons especially funny and entertaining were always all the topical popular cultural references and/or the inclusion of send-ups to classical literature/history which were geared to the adult audience members when these animated shorts were first released to the movie theaters back when a visit to the cinema included these, a newsreel, and then the main feature.

This sort of thing also worked well later on when animation moved from primarily being made for movie theaters to the made-for-television era during the late-'50s, and what would make successes of such animation as The Huckleberry Hound Show, The Rocky & Bullwinkle Show, and even decades later during the '90s with The Animaniacs.

Also, the breaking of the fourth wall by the various characters would quite often be utilized, with often the "slow-burn" look given directly to the audience by them to show their frustrations with whatever situation they might find themselves embroiled in the various scenes. 

(...and so, and unless these new editions of the adventures of Bugs, et al, ALSO include these very aspects within them, and do NOT just solely rely upon the frenetic actions I saw in the above clip, I don't think they're going to be all that successful)

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34 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Disney's movement looked so fluid and natural because they upped the frames to (what?) 24 per second? MGM was that level as well with the Tom & Gerry's. I think the reason why they called it Termite Terrrace was because WB was low brow-animation at something like 18 frames per second. I think really low budget Bullwinkle & Hanna Barbara Sat AM cartoons were even lower resolution.

Anyone know specific numbers?

Just because we're no longer limited to "frames per second" why does bring animators to the conclusion s p a s t i c is better?

From what I know as to the primary reason for the animators at the old W-B studios dubbing their specific place of employment "Termite Terrace" was because it was an old wooden bungalow located way out in a back location within that studio, Tiki.

They had evidently felt they were stuck way out there in that spot because the studio heads (probably Jack Warner himself) thought of their work was far less important than the other productions going on at the time.

(...and so I don't think the "frames per second" thing had much to do with the nicknaming of their production location)

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

From what I know as to the primary reason for the animators at the old W-B studios dubbing their specific place of employment "Termite Terrace" was because it was an old wooden bungalow located way out in a back location within that studio, Tiki.

They had evidently felt they were stuck way out there in that spot because the studio heads (probably Jack Warner himself) thought of their work was far less important than the other productions going on at the time.

Darn, you had to go ahead and post that, while I was checking for a YT clip from the Bugs Bunny Superstar (1976) doc.  ☹️  Short subjects were considered necessary "throwaway" filler, enough to get one building on the lot, but not lavished a great deal of money on by the studio.

And that hints at THE big problem, at why the new Bugs and the new Mickey, etc., and even Warner's any-minute-now attempt to bring back Tom & Jerry, aren't in the style of the old ones:  The entire industry for creating Selected Short Subjects to be shown in a theater to any audience (I remember seeing early-70's Pink Panther shorts before a UA movie, as a kid!) isn't there anymore, and now replaced by the entire "pop-culture gentrification" of Boomer-fan Classic Cartoon Worship by experienced experts--Cartoons are no longer made for unsuspecting mass fans or mass-market Saturday-morning TV, they're made for insular cable cults, by animators who want to nudge other animators about what great cartoon Boomer lore they can homage, while relishing a lifestyle where they can "do what they dreamed of doing when they were ten"...And craft the gags accordingly.  

The audience has been written out of the equation, so they go back and watch what WAS intended for an audience:  The old classics.  

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10 hours ago, EricJ said:

(I remember seeing early-70's Pink Panther shorts before a UA movie, as a kid!)

Yes! I'd completely forgotten about those! Of course, as a child I had no awareness of the different movie studios, so I didn't know why only some movies were preceded with Pink Panther shorts. The first thing that ever made me conscious of the name of a movie studio was the stirring Alfred Newman fanfare that kicked off 20th Century Fox films, which I probably heard for the first time when seeing Star Wars. It almost seemed to flow naturally into the kick-off of John Williams' score.

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23 hours ago, Dargo said:

Seems to me what made the classic W-B cartoons especially funny and entertaining were always all the topical popular cultural references and/or the inclusion of send-ups to classical literature/history which were geared to the adult audience members when these animated shorts were first released to the movie theaters back when a visit to the cinema included these, a newsreel, and then the main feature.

This sort of thing also worked well later on when animation moved from primarily being made for movie theaters to the made-for-television era during the late-'50s, and what would make successes of such animation as The Huckleberry Hound Show, The Rocky & Bullwinkle Show, and even decades later during the '90s with The Animaniacs.

Also, the breaking of the fourth wall by the various characters would quite often be utilized, with often the "slow-burn" look given directly to the audience by them to show their frustrations with whatever situation they might find themselves embroiled in the various scenes. 

(...and so, and unless these new editions of the adventures of Bugs, et al, ALSO include these very aspects within them, and do NOT just solely rely upon the frenetic actions I saw in the above clip, I don't think they're going to be all that successful)

I agree with what you mean and think that is why many of the newer cartoons fail but also keep in mind that this was just a one minute sample of what the shorts will be like. 

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