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sineast

"Yes we can can!" said Little Nicola.

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The song is good by itself, but just one photo gets a little boring.

Due to the inventive lyrics, I thought this might be a Jack Bruce/

Peter Brown song, but it was written by Ginger Baker. Ginger

looks pretty wasted, but maybe he got up too early.

 

I like the Eagles (the band). I think I have all of their albums, but

don't listen to them much anymore.

 

Gee, the afterlife sounds kind of dull. And if heaven is dry, Hank Williams

won't be anywhere around.

 

 

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One of my favorites by Mazzy Star, Look on Down from the Bridge.

 

 

Just found out that Mazzy Star is regrouping and are expected to

release a new album in the later part of 2012. Yippee.

 

 

 

 

 

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Wow, that was relaxing on steroids ( a bit oxymoronic, that.) Well then, let's say it would be a great song to put on a mix cd if the theme were "mellow and relaxing and quiet". Nice.

 

Tonight I am going to a Miles Davis tribute concert, so, even though it's transgressing the unwritten rule here ( no jazz? no long jazz?) I'm posting a Miles Davis number. It ties in with a movie, in a way - *Guys and Dolls*, the scene where Jean Simmons so charmingly gets drunk on milkshake-y tasting drinks and throws herself at Marlon Brando. At least she would if she were a bell.

 

 

But this isn't Jean, this is Miles Davis: If I Were a Bell :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Otis, who is *Mahatma Kane Jeeves ?*

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They are laid back to the extreme. I can't wait for the new CD to come out

to see if the sound is any different or if it is similar to the first three albums.

That has been one of the criticisms of Mazzy Star-not much of a change

in sound over the years. Maybe true, but it's never bothered me.

 

I don't mind folks posting jazz. I'm just more of a rock/pop fan and don't listen

to jazz that often.

 

Mahatma Kane Jeeves is another of W.C. Fields' screenwriting pseudonyms,

a play on the line My hat, My cane, Jeeves. I suppose it's also the name of

three people, Gandhi, the Orson Welles' character and the fictitious butler.

Whatever.

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Go, Wilson, baby! Good God, y'all !

 

The Miles Davis tribute last night was fantastic, but I will refrain from posting any more Miles stuff here. For one thing, almost all his tracks were really loooong - 8 minutes was short for him ( I'm talking about the tracks on his musical recordings, nothing else. :| ) For another, almost all of it is, of course, instrumental, and I recall Otis, in another incarnation, remarking once that he didn't particularly care for instrumentals. Ah well, moving on...

 

It's very difficult to find clips on the internet from original studio recordings by Bob Dylan, at least anything from his first few albums. And even when I do, often the "you can't do this" message will pop up - no "rights", either for me in Canada, and sometimes for you guys in the U.S. Let's hope this one makes it through, it's a great song from his early-ish period.

Spanish Harlem Incident:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8BVvLe1TJyI

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Wilson can really get into a groove. In general, I'm not a big fan of

instrumentals. I guess the Beatles weren't either. I forgot this while

posting on the Ben M. thread. I have not one but two albums by

Uriah Heep somewhere around. Oh, the errors of youth. Maybe I'll

post a UH song one day. You've been forewarned.

 

I do have that Bob Dylan album. I haven't listened to it in so long, I

recognized the opening lyrics of the song, but had forgotten the exact

title.

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Very nice - but was that tune really from "the summer of love"? ( that was 1967, was it not?) Just shows how separate country and rock were back then.

And - that name? ! When I hear the name "Norma Jean", I think of Marilyn Monroe. Was this the lady singer's real name, and if so, I wonder how often people brought up M.M. to her.

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Not really. In the late '60s, country and rock were coming together with groups like Poco, Flying Burrito Brothers. Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, New Riders of the Purple Sage, etc. The Eagles, etc., continued that tradition in the early '70s.

 

Edited by: finance on Jan 27, 2012 5:10 PM

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Ok, but just for the sake of argument ( which I know you shy away from in horror) I looked up all those bands on wiki. With the exception of "The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band", which apparently formed in 1966, none of those groups you named existed in 1967. And I gather that's the year Norma Jean's song is from. Things happened pretty fast, the second half of the 60s ( that we can agree on, I imagine), so the difference in musical genres and their overlapping could have changed greatly just in one year ( '67 to '68). The Flying Burrito Brothers, formed by the handsome, charming, tragic Gram Parson, didn't come into being until a year or so after 1967. Gram was still flirting with the Byrds that year.

 

The whole country/folk/rock/pop merge thing happened, I'd say, from '68 inclusive to the early 70s, after which time it was no longer iconoclastic to blend several genres of music. Yes, there are earlier examples of this happening ( the aforementioned Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, and, for that matter, The Byrds), but the division between traditional country music and rock was still pretty rigid in 1967. IMHO, anyway.

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To paraphrase a film, (I forget which), did you just return from the hairsplitters' convention? The Byrds themselves were also getting into country-rock in the late '60s ("Sweetheart of the Rodeo", I believe)

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Well, as I said:

 

"...The whole country/folk/rock/pop merge thing happened, I'd say, from '68 inclusive to the early 70s, after which time it was no longer iconoclastic to blend several genres of music. *Yes, there are earlier examples of this happening (* the aforementioned Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, and for that matter, *The Byrds* ), but the division between traditional country music and rock was still pretty rigid in 1967. IMHO, anyway."

 

Where's the hair-splitting?

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Jan 28, 2012 1:25 PM

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That was a little tongue-in-cheek. It was released during 1967, but it's

not what one typically thinks of when hearing the phrase Summer of Love.

For me that would be more along the lines of the Airplane, the Dead, and

don't forget Sgt. Pepper's Etc.

 

Norman Jean were her real first and middle names. It was a bit of an early

feminist song, at least to some degree.

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A tune of some topical interest about the special relationship between

a boy and his rat. Michael Jackson singing Ben. This video is bizarre

on a number of levels. Take your pick.

 

 

 

 

 

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Oh yeah, very weird, as you say, on a number of levels. I actually kind of like the song, it's a very pretty melody, but I cannot get past its being a love ode to a rat. And that's the least weird of the video's several bizarre aspects.

 

Cannot help but think this is some kind of ironic tie-in to another thread on this web-site. Maybe it should be posted there as well. :|

 

I know I just posted a Dylan song, but I always think on this date of The Clothesline Saga, from Dylan's joint effort with The Band - "The Basement Tapes". This is a truely great album, I love every track. A lot of fun, too.

Of course I could not find the original studio recording by the original artists on youtube, so settled for the Roche Sisters' version, which includes an entertaining video.

 

Today is January 30th, and everyone is feeling fine.

 

 

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As a tune, it's a very nice song if you didn't know it was about a rat, but

that's hard to ignore. I always get a kick out of the line Ben you're always

running here and there. One dose of Ben is probably enough. I remember

seeing Willard, but don't think I've ever seen Ben.

 

The Basement Tapes is one of those albums I've always meant to get, but

never got around to doing so. Same with Exile on Main St. Oh well.

 

 

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I'm not a big Jacko fan, but there was a time, maybe in the late 1970s and

early 1980s when he was just a pop phenomenon and wasn't more eccentric

than your usual pop star, but then things started to get truly weird and truly

weirder.

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Off the Wall is a very good pop song, I always liked it.

 

So, New Order were clearly not nearly as downbeat as their predecessor ( "Joy Division".) Catchy tune, as Alan Arkin remarks in "Wait Until Dark".

 

Speaking of good pop and catchy tunes, here's a Canadian artist of course nobody's heard of - even I've barely heard of him. But it's a really infectious number, and an entertaining video.

Rich Aucoin with It :

 

 

 

...just occurred to me, there might be some "rights" b.s. around it, and you guys south of the Canadian border might not be able to get it. Too bad, if that's the case - it's very cinema-referential ( I just made up that pretentious-sounding phrase, and proud of it. :| Let me know if it makes it through or not.)

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Feb 1, 2012 12:23 PM

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Houston, we have successful download. That is a fine pop song and good

video. I've never seen E.T. or Ghost Busters. Oops. Doesn't Aucoin sort of

translate as on the or around the corner? He is a lot better looking than

Mr. Sexsmith. Yep, life is just like a can of Heinz baked beans.

 

New Order dropped much of the Joy Division gloom and were a lot more

dance friendly, though they have some songs that are on the cynical,

somewhat despairing side.

 

Off the Wall was when Jacko was still a very successful pop star, before the

oxygen tank and the pet chimp came along. At least he was working his way

up the evolutionary ladder, away from Ben. That's a good thing.

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