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45a9054e5e82c5c91dac2af4861f4144.jpg

Yes, life is rough out on old Route 66.

 

 

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

45a9054e5e82c5c91dac2af4861f4144.jpg

 

 

 

 

I didn't want to gunk up the film noir thread with too many Route 66 posts. Plus noir is about the seamy side of life and desperate, alienated characters and untrustworthy babes. Whereas Route 66 is about two all-American boys who do what they can to point their fellow citizens in the right direction in small towns and big cities and points in between while tooling around in their Corvette. Nice work if you can get it.

 

Today's episode stars Tueday Weld in one of those person returning to a small town (in Texas) to reveal a secret plot. Not going to go into the details because it would take too long. Suffice it to say that Tuesday is having problems with her mother, played by Cloris Leachman. After going through much angst, she decides to leave town with Tod and Buz headed for their next destination. Burt Reynolds has a small role as a punk about town who still dresses like it's 1955. As he tells Buz, I don't like you, Jack. I thought that late in the episode Buz might beat the crap out of Burt but they never tangle again. And when a young woman ask Buz why he is so interested about a small town he has never visited he tells her he's just a lube job. Sorry son, I don't know where you're from, but we don't go for that kind of thing around here. As many know, Burt, like Joe Buck, left his small Texas town but instead of heading for NYC, Burt took off north to Kansas to take up the blacksmithing trade in Dodge City. 

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1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

45a9054e5e82c5c91dac2af4861f4144.jpg

Yes, life is rough out on old Route 66.

 

Buz Murdock and Tod Stiles

 

 

I was such a George Maharis fan that I bought his recording of "Get Your Kicks on Route 66". But what was really great was Nelson Riddle's recording of "Route 66".

About 10 years ago I bought the DVDs for I think just Season 1. Since the show was always filmed on location, from the same producers of "Naked City", it was just fantastic to see America as it really was. And this was before America became so canned with all those awful fast food places. The show was filled with all of these method actors that came out of New York like George Maharis. I remember so many of them but Barbara Barrie really does stand out in my mind. But the best actors of all were those ordinary Americans living their everyday lives that the guys ran into. And they filmed them so well, the show is almost like a docudrama or as the French would say: cinema verite' in the background while there's a script going on in the foreground.

Watching that series recently, I realized how good Martin Milner was. What he lacked in sex appeal, he certainly made up for in his acting ability. LOL

 

 

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9 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I didn't want to gunk up the film noir thread with too many Route 66 posts. Plus noir is about the seamy side of life and desperate, alienated characters and untrustworthy babes. Whereas Route 66 is about two all-American boys who do what they can to point their fellow citizens in the right direction in small towns and big cities and points in between while tooling around in their Corvette. Nice work if you can get it.

 

Today's episode stars Tueday Weld in one of those person returning to a small town (in Texas) to reveal a secret plot. Not going to go into the details because it would take too long. Suffice it to say that Tuesday is having problems with her mother, played by Cloris Leachman. After going through much angst, she decides to leave town with Tod and Buz headed for their next destination. Burt Reynolds has a small role as a punk about town who still dresses like it's 1955. As he tells Buz, I don't like you, Jack. I thought that late in the episode Buz might beat the crap out of Burt but they never tangle again. And when a young woman ask Buz why he is so interested about a small town he has never visited he tells her he's just a lube job. Sorry son, I don't know where you're from, but we don't go for that kind of thing around here. As many know, Burt, like Joe Buck, left his small Texas town but instead of heading for NYC, Burt took off north to Kansas to take up the blacksmithing trade in Dodge City. 

Thanks for doing this.  I thought about it and how much I had posted on the Noir Alley thread.

I'll have to watch that episode again as I don't recall Buz saying "he's just a lube job."  Maybe they stopped in for a lube job on the Corvette?

I often wondered how much the producers spent for the casts to travel to the locations.  While they obviously used some locals, most of the actors were brought in.

Only two episodes were filmed on Route 66. The rest were all over the country with two in Canada.  13 episodes in seasons 3 and 4 were filmed in Florida, including the last six.

Roxbury Entertainment/Infinity released the DVD's many years ago.  I think they went out of business before doing Season Four, which Shout did.  Somebody is doing all four seasons now as a set.

Always enjoy Milner in this and Adam 12.  Supposedly one of his attributes for the Adam 12 role was that he had learned how to stop a car on the mark in Route 66.

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16 hours ago, hamradio said:

 

8E17CEA4-D6A3-A138-0335C0FA13363B8E.jpg

Talk about 40 miles of bad road. If it was on today it would likely be called something

like I-65, not quite as romantic as Route 66.

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16 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I was such a George Maharis fan that I bought his recording of "Get Your Kicks on Route 66". But what was really great was Nelson Riddle's recording of "Route 66".

About 10 years ago I bought the DVDs for I think just Season 1. Since the show was always filmed on location, from the same producers of "Naked City", it was just fantastic to see America as it really was. And this was before America became so canned with all those awful fast food places. The show was filled with all of these method actors that came out of New York like George Maharis. I remember so many of them but Barbara Barrie really does stand out in my mind. But the best actors of all were those ordinary Americans living their everyday lives that the guys ran into. And they filmed them so well, the show is almost like a docudrama or as the French would say: cinema verite' in the background while there's a script going on in the foreground.

Watching that series recently, I realized how good Martin Milner was. What he lacked in sex appeal, he certainly made up for in his acting ability. LOL

 

 

George was a very good looking guy. I agree that one of the best things about the series is the location shooting and the record of what is now a vanished world. Of course many of the actors on the show were the "usual suspects" who appeared on many TV shows of the period and could play a variety of characters. Even with location shooting there was the occasional Hollywood make-over. The episode with Tuesday Weld was supposed to occur in a certain small town in Texas but for some reason was actually shot in a neighboring town with the name of the town's newspaper changed. But it's still an accurate record of time and place.

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9 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Talk about 40 miles of bad road. If it was on today it would likely be called something

like I-65, not quite as romantic as Route 66.

I taught at the University of New Mexico alongside Route 66 in Albuquerque a few years back.

There was nothing very unique or Scenic about it. It was primarily payday loans, Walgreens, and fast food places.

Plus There were a lot of homeless Native Americans on the street trying to go into the fast food places to use the restroom.

And there were a lot of homeless white men panhandling and trying to go into the fast food restaurants to use the restroom.

But it was still Route 66 going through Albuquerque.

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7 hours ago, TheCid said:

Thanks for doing this.  I thought about it and how much I had posted on the Noir Alley thread.

I'll have to watch that episode again as I don't recall Buz saying "he's just a lube job."  Maybe they stopped in for a lube job on the Corvette?

I often wondered how much the producers spent for the casts to travel to the locations.  While they obviously used some locals, most of the actors were brought in.

Only two episodes were filmed on Route 66. The rest were all over the country with two in Canada.  13 episodes in seasons 3 and 4 were filmed in Florida, including the last six.

Roxbury Entertainment/Infinity released the DVD's many years ago.  I think they went out of business before doing Season Four, which Shout did.  Somebody is doing all four seasons now as a set.

Always enjoy Milner in this and Adam 12.  Supposedly one of his attributes for the Adam 12 role was that he had learned how to stop a car on the mark in Route 66.

I think that was just Buz being Buz. They had stopped in this town to have the car lubed and were going to have a bite to eat while waiting. So of course they wound up getting involved in this whole convoluted story about something that happened a while back. Buz likely just meant that they were just passing through and didn't have much to do with what was happening in the town, at least in theory. I've noticed that two or three consecutive episodes would be set around the same place, probably to save costs and make logistics easier. Recently a few episodes were set around Dallas and before that a couple around Pittsburgh. I haven't seen Adam 12 since it was first on TV. Pretty good, though it didn't have the wacky vibe of the 1960s version of Dragnet. 

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9 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I think that was just Buz being Buz. They had stopped in this town to have the car lubed and were going to have a bite to eat while waiting. So of course they wound up getting involved in this whole convoluted story about something that happened a while back. Buz likely just meant that they were just passing through and didn't have much to do with what was happening in the town, at least in theory. I've noticed that two or three consecutive episodes would be set around the same place, probably to save costs and make logistics easier. Recently a few episodes were set around Dallas and before that a couple around Pittsburgh. I haven't seen Adam 12 since it was first on TV. Pretty good, though it didn't have the wacky vibe of the 1960s version of Dragnet. 

The original Dragnet was really a good show. That Neo Dragnet was an absolute scream. It was great for comedy relief. Harry Morgan is a good actor to be able to do something like that and then to go over to MASH. But I guess that's what acting is all about.

I'm glad to hear that Adam-12 wasn't as bad as all that. The last time I saw Marty Milner he was still playing a police officer on Murder She Wrote. It was an above-average episode with Ann Blyth as the guest star.... Not a Bad episode at all

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15 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

I taught at the University of New Mexico alongside Route 66 in Albuquerque a few years back.

There was nothing very unique or Scenic about it. It was primarily payday loans, Walgreens, and fast food places.

Plus There were a lot of homeless Native Americans on the street trying to go into the fast food places to use the restroom.

And there were a lot of homeless white men panhandling and trying to go into the fast food restaurants to use the restroom.

But it was still Route 66 going through Albuquerque.

Route 66 as a real highway disappeared many, many years ago.  What is left is nothing like what it must have been.  There are shows and DVD's featuring the old motels, gas stations, sites and so forth; some of which still exist.  But, the interstates killed it.

Of course, the TV show had nothing to do with Route 66 other than it sounded good as a show title.  It also gave that vibe of travelling across America on an adventure.

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

I taught at the University of New Mexico alongside Route 66 in Albuquerque a few years back.

There was nothing very unique or Scenic about it. It was primarily payday loans, Walgreens, and fast food places.

Plus There were a lot of homeless Native Americans on the street trying to go into the fast food places to use the restroom.

And there were a lot of homeless white men panhandling and trying to go into the fast food restaurants to use the restroom.

But it was still Route 66 going through Albuquerque.

The Dark Side of Route 66 :). Every once in a while there will be an article in the newspaper on how folks are trying to bring back a section of 66 to its glory days with mixed results. I doubt it will ever be what it was back in the day. Better to remember if as it was and let it go.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

The original Dragnet was really a good show. That Neo Dragnet was an absolute scream. It was great for comedy relief. Henry Morgan is a good actor to be able to do something like that and then to go over to MASH. But I guess that's what acting is all about.

I'm glad to hear that Adam-12 wasn't as bad as all that. The last time I saw Marty Milner he was still playing a police officer on Murder She Wrote. It was an above-average episode with Ann Blyth as the guest star.... Not a Bad episode at all

Yep, the 1960s Dragnet was funnier than most of the comedy shows on then. It was even funnier in retrospect when all the excitement of the 1960s was long gone. I think I've already posted about the episode where Friday is going to night school and overhears some kids talking about smoking pot. Naturally he eventually busts them. Henry Morgan's character was always trying to find a wife for Joe. The lucky girl always got away.

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1 minute ago, Vautrin said:

Yep, the 1960s Dragnet was funnier than most of the comedy shows on then. It was even funnier in retrospect when all the excitement of the 1960s was long gone. I think I've already posted about the episode where Friday is going to night school and overhears some kids talking about smoking pot. Naturally he eventually busts them. Henry Morgan's character was always trying to find a wife for Joe. The lucky girl always got away.

 I know you remember the one about the baby in the bathtub.

I think I would give that a10.

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2 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

 I know you remember the one about the baby in the bathtub.

I think I would give that a10.

Yes, that one is right near the top or at it, along with blue boy going crazy on acid. Yakahoohooyahh. There was also one with a high school kid who was into Baudelaire and Verlaine and thought he should go out and kill people or something. Naturally good ol' Sgt. Friday was there quote for quote. 

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1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

Yes, that one is right near the top or at it, along with blue boy going crazy on acid. Yakahoohooyahh. There was also one with a high school kid who was into Baudelaire and Verlaine and thought he should go out and kill people or something. Naturally good ol' Sgt. Friday was there quote for quote. 

My research has shown me that Baudelaire was more artistic talk than action. But Verlaine was the real deal-- in Paris and Brussels.

I once went to a church in the Latin Quarter that honored him and his beloved absinthe with a cultural poem reading service, believe it or not. During his lifetime, he was a legendary famous bum in the Latin Quarter.

Near La Grande Place in Brussels  I actually found that room where all the action took place between him and Rimbaud.

Yes, he was the real deal and had the wife and kiddies still at home to prove it. And Il Pleut dans la Ville is still my favorite poem. 

Maybe that new Dragnet wasn't so bad after all.

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3 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

My research has shown me that Baudelaire was more artistic talk than action. But Verlaine was the real deal-- in Paris and Brussels.

I once went to a church in the Latin Quarter that honored him and his beloved absinthe with a cultural poem reading service, believe it or not. During his lifetime, he was a legendary famous bum in the Latin Quarter.

Near La Grande Place in Brussels  I actually found that room where all the action took place between him and Rimbaud.

Yes, he was the real deal and had the wife and kiddies still at home to prove it. And Il Pleut dans la Ville is still my favorite poem. 

Maybe that new Dragnet wasn't so bad after all.

Both Baudelaire and Verlaine led unconventional lives, no doubt about that, but I agree that Baudelaire was more interested in the ideal than in the everyday, though he had to live there just like most people. Verlaine did go downhill in his later years but I don't know if he was particularly violent. And I can't think of many of his poems that would advocate violence. The Dragnet episode was about an adolescent who took all les poetes maudits too seriously. I doubt that many actual LA cops of that time knew very much about French literature. I remember reading somewhere that Verlaine's mother kept her miscarried fetuses in alcohol jars. That would drive anyone batty. I suppose my favorite poem of that period would be Baudelaire's Le Voyage. 

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1 minute ago, Vautrin said:

Both Baudelaire and Verlaine led unconventional lives, no doubt about that, but I agree that Baudelaire was more interested in the ideal than in the everyday, though he had to live there just like most people. Verlaine did go downhill in his later years but I don't know if he was particularly violent. And I can't think of many of his poems that would advocate violence. The Dragnet episode was about an adolescent who took all les poetes maudits too seriously. I doubt that many actual LA cops of that time knew very much about French literature. I remember reading somewhere that Verlaine's mother kept her miscarried fetuses in alcohol jars. That would drive anyone batty. I suppose my favorite poem of that period would be Baudelaire's Le Voyage. 

Well, I would say it was generally true that Verlaine was not particularly violent except for that one episode where he shot Rimbaud.

I had to watch the Leonardo DiCaprio movie "Total Eclipse" about the whole affair in one of my graduate French classes in 1995. I found out that things had certainly changed in college since I attended as an undergraduate so many years ago. LOL

Have you seen "Total Eclipse"?

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Well, the boys have left Texas and headed up to Cleveland, Ohio. The episode has the well known poor little rich boy plot, you know the rich kid whose father is so into his business dealings that he pays no attention to his son. The son tries every way he knows to get his dad's attention, including a fake kidnapping scheme. Tod and Buz are working as hands on a tourist boat that chugs around Lake Erie and the Cuyahoga river. As usual they just happened to get all caught up in the drama. These two guys attract trouble like a couple of magnets. Not a bad episode but nothing really spectacular. Ralph Meeker plays the dad, who is busy but not mean as Meeker often is in his roles. Maybe the son is also a little depressed because he is a Cleveland Indians' fan. Of course in the end dad realizes his faults and promises to spend more time with sonny boy. The end.

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

Well, I would say it was generally true that Verlaine was not particularly violent except for that one episode where he shot Rimbaud.

I had to watch the Leonardo DiCaprio movie "Total Eclipse" about the whole affair in one of my graduate French classes in 1995. I found out that things had certainly changed in college since I attended as an undergraduate so many years ago. LOL

Have you seen "Total Eclipse"?

Yes I saw it about fifteen years ago, give or take. Don't recall too many of the details. I would rather read about it than watch a movie about it. If Total Eclipse was like most movies, the facts are likely to take a bit of a detour.

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1 minute ago, Vautrin said:

Yes I saw it about fifteen years ago, give or take. Don't recall too many of the details. I would rather read about it than watch a movie about it. If Total Eclipse was like most movies, the facts are likely to take a bit of a detour.

We actually studied this in class. And I can't remember how long Verlaine was in prison. But it seems like after that he did go back to his wife for a while. 

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

We actually studied this in class. And I can't remember how long Verlaine was in prison. But it seems like after that he did go back to his wife for a while. 

Sounds about right. I have a biography of Verlaine somewhere around. I'm sure Wiki would have a fairly good summary.

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11 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Well, the boys have left Texas and headed up to Cleveland, Ohio. The episode has the well known poor little rich boy plot, you know the rich kid whose father is so into his business dealings that he pays no attention to his son. The son tries every way he knows to get his dad's attention, including a fake kidnapping scheme. Tod and Buz are working as hands on a tourist boat that chugs around Lake Erie and the Cuyahoga river. As usual they just happened to get all caught up in the drama. These two guys attract trouble like a couple of magnets. Not a bad episode but nothing really spectacular. Ralph Meeker plays the dad, who is busy but not mean as Meeker often is in his roles. Maybe the son is also a little depressed because he is a Cleveland Indians' fan. Of course in the end dad realizes his faults and promises to spend more time with sonny boy. The end.

Episode 27 in Season Two, originally shown Apr 20, 1962.  Next episode is about a girl with her foot stuck in a rock as tide is coming in and Buz is racing around trying to find someone to help.  Then Buz drops out for a while, but comes back.

Funny one coming up in about 11 more episodes features Lon Chaney, Jr., Boris Karloff and Peter Lorre.  I think it was a Halloween show. 

I was watching a Mecum's auction this morning and they made reference to Route 66 as they were selling a 1960 Corvette - it went for $105,000.  The one in the series was always blue as it photographed better.  Each year they got a new one with no explanation.  Chevrolet insisted.  They could only drive the car when filming.  

Below is a Wiki link that lists all the episodes with a very brief description and the titles.  There are sites with more details.  One of the interesting things is the titles.  I think Sterling Silliphant came up with them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Route_66_episodes#Season_2_(1961–62)

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22 minutes ago, JR33928 said:

 

 

A lot of Season Three and Four were filmed in Florida - somebody must have liked it.

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