Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

13 hours ago, Marianne said:

So people participating on this thread are watching or rewatching Route 66 now? (Great idea, by the way.)

I purchased the DVD's as they were released, one season per set.  Now they have all four seasons in one set.  I frequently re-watch episodes I particularly like and the 50 or so minute length is pretty good.

Some of the sets have original commercials which are interesting.  Phillips Milk of Magnesia and Bayer Aspirin are two that I recall.  A couple of Chevy ads, but not as many as the other two.

Ironically, while Chevy provided the Corvette, a van for the Milner family and lots of cars for "scenery," they only sponsored half-hour segments.  I think that was true of a lot of one hour shows in that period.

I barely remember the series from when it was on TV.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Yes, here it is, http://www.ohio66.com/ . It covers a little over 20 episodes, many of them in

Ohio as the name indicates. I don't know if anyone is working on doing more episodes. I hope

so.

Thanks.  I think I found that site years ago, but forgot about it.  The episodes in FL are ones I find most interesting. Lot of them in seasons 3 & 4.  Once you find out where they were,you can google that location and see what is there now.  Same for some businesses, hotels, etc.

A key to hotels is if they show a lot of signage or have a credit at the end of credits for the hotel.  Same for businesses.  Many shows did.

One of my favorite episodes is But What Do You Do In March?  Susan Kohner, Janice Rule, Guy Lombardo, Herbert Leonard's very young daughters.  Leonard was the creator and frequent writer.  It is set in Tierra Verde, FL near St. Petersburg which was an island created by developers.  They dredged sand from bay to create it.  Tod is selling lots.  A google street (?) view shows a fully developed community.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, TheCid said:

Thanks.  I think I found that site years ago, but forgot about it.  The episodes in FL are ones I find most interesting. Lot of them in seasons 3 & 4.  Once you find out where they were,you can google that location and see what is there now.  Same for some businesses, hotels, etc.

A key to hotels is if they show a lot of signage or have a credit at the end of credits for the hotel.  Same for businesses.  Many shows did.

One of my favorite episodes is But What Do You Do In March?  Susan Kohner, Janice Rule, Guy Lombardo, Herbert Leonard's very young daughters.  Leonard was the creator and frequent writer.  It is set in Tierra Verde, FL near St. Petersburg which was an island created by developers.  They dredged sand from bay to create it.  Tod is selling lots.  A google street (?) view shows a fully developed community.

I thought that in lieu of payment for staying in the motel, the producers gave them a free name check at the end of the credits. I have read that in the case of some smaller businesses the producers would put up a sign to make the business more visually appealing for TV. The Florida episodes sound interesting. Janice Rule was in an earlier one where she played a woman involved in the family's boat business in Massachusetts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

I thought that in lieu of payment for staying in the motel, the producers gave them a free name check at the end of the credits. I have read that in the case of some smaller businesses the producers would put up a sign to make the business more visually appealing for TV. The Florida episodes sound interesting. Janice Rule was in an earlier one where she played a woman involved in the family's boat business in Massachusetts.

Ironically in the later one in FL, Tod talks to Linc about being careful about developing a relationship with a rich woman.  He says he almost did it himself once.  Janice Rule played the rich woman, but different characters, in both shows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TheCid said:

Ironically in the later one in FL, Tod talks to Linc about being careful about developing a relationship with a rich woman.  He says he almost did it himself once.  Janice Rule played the rich woman, but different characters, in both shows.

The first romance with Rule went south rather quickly as I recall. Tod Stiles, over and out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Vautrin said:

The first romance with Rule went south rather quickly as I recall. Tod Stiles, over and out.

Actually it lasted a pretty good while, for a 54 minute show.  He was all set to marry her and take over the boat building business until she said she was going to sell it and travel the world, mostly Europe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, TheCid said:

Actually it lasted a pretty good while, for a 54 minute show.  He was all set to marry her and take over the boat building business until she said she was going to sell it and travel the world, mostly Europe.

I guess it did. She was too independent for the early 1960s. Of course the money didn't hurt either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I guess it did. She was too independent for the early 1960s. Of course the money didn't hurt either.

Thinking back, the series did seem to have a goodly number of independent women.  Of course that made it easier for Tod or Buz or Linc to break up with them at the end of the episode and move on to a new girl next episode.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, TheCid said:

Thinking back, the series did seem to have a goodly number of independent women.  Of course that made it easier for Tod or Buz or Linc to break up with them at the end of the episode and move on to a new girl next episode.

Yes, they would be leaving town soon anyway so why bother to get into any deep relationships for the most part. There was Julie Newmar as the multi-millionaire heiress. She could do just about anything she wanted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Yes, they would be leaving town soon anyway so why bother to get into any deep relationships for the most part. There was Julie Newmar as the multi-millionaire heiress. She could do just about anything she wanted.

She played the same role in two episodes.  Both very entertaining.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TheCid said:

She played the same role in two episodes.  Both very entertaining.

She was definitely on the eccentric side or maybe just ahead of her time. 

With all the dough she had she could get away with it. Anyone else might

be in for a rough ride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/9/2019 at 8:07 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Marianne, when I was a kid I watched all those episodes so many years ago on TV.

When the DVDs came out I bought some of them and that's been about 10 years ago.

I have a pretty good memory but if I see one that I really liked a lot I'll rewatch it.

Do you remember the original series on CBS?

Or did you pick this up on DVDs?

P. of T.: I don't recall ever watching Route 66 on television when it was first broadcast. But I saw the entire series when it was re-broadcast in recent years -- I think it was WMPX. I can't find the station any more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/10/2019 at 4:25 PM, Vautrin said:

I thought that in lieu of payment for staying in the motel, the producers gave them a free name check at the end of the credits. I have read that in the case of some smaller businesses the producers would put up a sign to make the business more visually appealing for TV. The Florida episodes sound interesting. Janice Rule was in an earlier one where she played a woman involved in the family's boat business in Massachusetts.

I remember this episode. For some reason, I still find it hard to believe that Janice Rule also appeared in Bell, Book, and Candle with Kim Novak and James Stewart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Marianne said:

I remember this episode. For some reason, I still find it hard to believe that Janice Rule also appeared in Bell, Book, and Candle with Kim Novak and James Stewart.

I think of Janice Rule as more of a TV actress than a movie one, though she had some good

movie roles too. On TV she often played the uptight upper class woman with some kind of

complicated problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tod and Buz have left small town Missouri behind for the big city, in this case Chicago. They are working as cabbies for the same company. They run into an old mafia bag man played by Luther Adler. Adler has just been released from the slammer after serving 32 years. Tod finds Adler to be an interesting symbol of old time Chicago, Buz finds him to be just another criminal scumbag. Adler gets Tod to drive him around to his old time haunts, most of which are no longer there or greatly changed, as are some of his fellow crooks from the old days. Adler has a hard time accepting the fact that things have changed quite a bit over three decades. What a drag it is to get old. He also starts getting threatening phone calls from someone he thinks is out to get him. One person he suspects is his old girlfriend played by Glenda Farrell who is now working the hot dog stand. She doesn't have a clue. But she does tell Adler that she has his old trunk which he has been trying to find for the whole of the episode. It contains all his fancy duds from the 1930s, silk shirts, expensive suits, handmade hats, etc. Buz has warmed up a bit to Adler and he and Tod are at the old guy's apartment when he says he hears the phone ring, likely another threatening call. But as Tod and Buz know, the phone is not ringing at all. Old Luther has slipped his gear, gone off the deep end, his attic needs cleaning. Sadly Tod picks up the phone and calls the state mental hospital for a pickup. Here are your old movie stars, Luther Adler and Glenda Farrell. The overriding theme of this episode to me was the trouble Adler had in realizing it's not 1930 anymore and his failure to get used to his present situation. You'd feel more sorry for him if he wasn't the arrogant jackass that he likely was back in the day.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Tod and Buz have left small town Missouri behind for the big city, in this case Chicago. They are working as cabbies for the same company. They run into an old mafia bag man played by Luther Adler. Adler has just been released from the slammer after serving 32 years. Tod finds Adler to be an interesting symbol of old time Chicago, Buz finds him to be just another criminal scumbag. Adler gets Tod to drive him around to his old time haunts, most of which are no longer there or greatly changed, as are some of his fellow crooks from the old days. Adler has a hard time accepting the fact that things have changed quite a bit over three decades. What a drag it is to get old. He also starts getting threatening phone calls from someone he thinks is out to get him. One person he suspects is his old girlfriend played by Glenda Farrell who is now working the hot dog stand. She doesn't have a clue. But she does tell Adler that she has his old trunk which he has been trying to find for the whole of the episode. It contains all his fancy duds from the 1930s, silk shirts, expensive suits, handmade hats, etc. Buz has warmed up a bit to Adler and he and Tod are at the old guy's apartment when he says he hears the phone ring, likely another threatening call. But as Tod and Buz know, the phone is not ringing at all. Old Luther has slipped his gear, gone off the deep end, his attic needs cleaning. Sadly Tod picks up the phone and calls the state mental hospital for a pickup. Here are your old movie stars, Luther Adler and Glenda Farrell. The overriding theme of this episode to me was the trouble Adler had in realizing it's not 1930 anymore and his failure to get used to his present situation. You'd feel more sorry for him if he wasn't the arrogant jackass that he likely was back in the day.

But Luther Adler was the jackass who got the "Golden Boy" role on Broadway instead of John Garfield.

Luther Adler guest stars in one of my favorite Untouchables where he plays a gangster trying to elude his enemies, as well as  Eliot Ness, in the middle of a chaotic Mardi Gras celebration down in New Orleans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

But Luther Adler was the jackass who got the "Golden Boy" role on Broadway instead of John Garfield.

Luther Adler guest stars in one of my favorite Untouchables where he plays a gangster trying to elude his enemies, as well as  Eliot Ness, in the middle of a chaotic Mardi Gras celebration down in New Orleans.

At least when it came to movies, Garfield did a lot better than Adler. Adler was very good in the role of the fancy pants crook in D.O.A. Too bad about ol' Chester though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

At least when it came to movies, Garfield did a lot better than Adler. Adler was very good in the role of the fancy pants crook in D.O.A. Too bad about ol' Chester though. 

This may sound redundant-- but DOA was an anti-climax movie for me.

But I have trouble with any film where women are falling all over Edmond O'Brien. Like the Ida Lupino film "The Bigamist", two classy women fighting over Edmond O'Brien. But I'll give Ida a break on this one because she had to direct and act on a very tight budget. It wasn't like she had her first choice of Leading Men.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

This may sound redundant-- but DOA was an anti-climax movie for me.

But I have trouble with any film where women are falling all over Edmond O'Brien. Like the Ida Lupino film "The Bigamist", two classy women fighting over Edmond O'Brien. But I'll give Ida a break on this one because she had to direct and act on a very tight budget. It wasn't like she had her first choice of Leading Men.

 

Love is bland. I like O'Brien but I never caught his appeal for women. The only thing I can think of

the forceful personality and never quit philosophy that he had in many of his roles. Paula certainly

was a sweet thing. Too bad she lost the love of her life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hahahahahahaha Wipeout. The guys are putting a lot of mileage on the 'vette. From Chicago west to southern California where they pick up a surfer dude who is on his way to challenge the king surfer of the local beach, Hob Unfortunately, the greenie takes a wrong turn in the surf and breaks his neck. Buz is incensed at the whole affair, including Hob's lack of feeling for the greenie's death. He decides to challenge Hob, but needs a quick tutor in the surfing art as there weren't many waves in Hell's Kitchen. Debbie, a cute beach bunny, knows how to surf too and she helps Buz learn. Buz tries to shoot the pier too soon and ends up with his surf board smashed but in okay condition himself. He humiliates Hob by going to the fancy restaurant where the surf king works as a lowly waiter. Buz gives him some good zingers, but Tod gets all sensitive and leaves. Early in the morning Buz goes out on his surf board and successfully shoots the pier, Hemingway on a surf board. Hob is the only one to see it. As the boys start to pack up to get back on the road, Hob comes and makes his peace with Buz spouting a lot of mumbo jumbo that I never quite understood. Maybe something about you've got to be who you are. Tod, Buz, and Hob part, a sadder but wiser group. Not bad, though it helps if you're into surfing and an interesting look at the surfing culture of the time. Debbie was played by an actress named Romney Tree! She only had a couple of roles in the early 1960s and then, for whatever reason, left show biz. Hob was played by Jeremy Slate who appeared in a number of TV shows of the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Hahahahahahaha Wipeout. The guys are putting a lot of mileage on the 'vette. From Chicago west to southern California where they pick up a surfer dude who is on his way to challenge the king surfer of the local beach, Hob Unfortunately, the greenie takes a wrong turn in the surf and breaks his neck. Buz is incensed at the whole affair, including Hob's lack of feeling for the greenie's death. He decides to challenge Hob, but needs a quick tutor in the surfing art as there weren't many waves in Hell's Kitchen. Debbie, a cute beach bunny, knows how to surf too and she helps Buz learn. Buz tries to shoot the pier too soon and ends up with his surf board smashed but in okay condition himself. He humiliates Hob by going to the fancy restaurant where the surf king works as a lowly waiter. Buz gives him some good zingers, but Tod gets all sensitive and leaves. Early in the morning Buz goes out on his surf board and successfully shoots the pier, Hemingway on a surf board. Hob is the only one to see it. As the boys start to pack up to get back on the road, Hob comes and makes his peace with Buz spouting a lot of mumbo jumbo that I never quite understood. Maybe something about you've got to be who you are. Tod, Buz, and Hob part, a sadder but wiser group. Not bad, though it helps if you're into surfing and an interesting look at the surfing culture of the time. Debbie was played by an actress named Romney Tree! She only had a couple of roles in the early 1960s and then, for whatever reason, left show biz. Hob was played by Jeremy Slate who appeared in a number of TV shows of the time.

Are you still getting only two episodes on Saturday and two on Sunday?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TheCid said:

Are you still getting only two episodes on Saturday and two on Sunday?

Yes, though I had already seen some of this weekend's episodes on YT. Now I'm kind of glad they took away the weekday episodes. It was getting to be too much to keep track of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/9/2019 at 6:08 PM, Princess of Tap said:

Right now I'm watching the episode that had my favorite title:  Ever ride the waves in Oklahoma?

This takes me back to 1962 and the beginning of the surfing craze and The Beach Boys.

Fantastic Discovery here though, the episode was written by Borden and Frank Chase. They're well-known screenwriters but they're also the father and the brother of Fred Astaire's dancing TV partner, Barrie Chase.

TV actor Jeremy Slate  guest stars and he had a TV series somewhere back in the day plus I've seen him on a few Perry Mason's.

I'll have to see if the title lives up to my memories. LOL

1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

Hahahahahahaha Wipeout. The guys are putting a lot of mileage on the 'vette. From Chicago west to southern California where they pick up a surfer dude who is on his way to challenge the king surfer of the local beach, Hob Unfortunately, the greenie takes a wrong turn in the surf and breaks his neck. Buz is incensed at the whole affair, including Hob's lack of feeling for the greenie's death. He decides to challenge Hob, but needs a quick tutor in the surfing art as there weren't many waves in Hell's Kitchen. Debbie, a cute beach bunny, knows how to surf too and she helps Buz learn. Buz tries to shoot the pier too soon and ends up with his surf board smashed but in okay condition himself. He humiliates Hob by going to the fancy restaurant where the surf king works as a lowly waiter. Buz gives him some good zingers, but Tod gets all sensitive and leaves. Early in the morning Buz goes out on his surf board and successfully shoots the pier, Hemingway on a surf board. Hob is the only one to see it. As the boys start to pack up to get back on the road, Hob comes and makes his peace with Buz spouting a lot of mumbo jumbo that I never quite understood. Maybe something about you've got to be who you are. Tod, Buz, and Hob part, a sadder but wiser group. Not bad, though it helps if you're into surfing and an interesting look at the surfing culture of the time. Debbie was played by an actress named Romney Tree! She only had a couple of roles in the early 1960s and then, for whatever reason, left show biz. Hob was played by Jeremy Slate who appeared in a number of TV shows of the time.

Last week I made a comment about this show. I posted it above yours.

I'm sorry to say that my hero Buz was a real jerk in this one, A jerk and a fool.

I love the part where Tod said he would hold Jeremy Slate's coat while he beat up Buz.

This was a real "Macho" episode --one of those a man's got to do what a man's got to do or whatever. LOL

But some of that was whittled down with the young woman having all that skill and teaching Buz the ropes of surfing.

Now I think I'd give the episode a different title. One of Brian Wilson's recent solo albums sounds apropos: No Pier Pressure.

On this album they include an old recording of Brian singing a man's got to do what a man's got to do song called "In the back of my mind".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's the summer of '62. My father and his then 10 year old son (me) packed up the family's '59 Chevy station wagon to head back to his old stomping grounds of Indianapolis IN to visit his family members who never moved out to L.A. after the war like he and his older sister Bess did. The route to be taken for most of the way and until we hit St. Louis would be of course Route 66.

As we headed through the California desert and into Arizona, I began to spot many an earth mover grading what will become that new, wider and more modern high-speed interstate road just off to the side of the old two lane road we're traveling upon.

I was in charge of navigation with those Rand McNally road maps on my lap, and also the radioman in charge of finding the next AM radio station on that Chevy's Delco radio which was centrally located on the dashboard and with that one lone oval shaped 9 inch speaker sitting up there in the sun and under that large curved windshield.

It seemed as we would get closer to the next little town along this ribbon of road and to the next little town's AM station, its signal would get stronger and clearer as we drove toward it and that Nelson Riddle-composed theme song from that TV show my parents would regularly watch on CBS, but which this then 10 year old would usually find somewhat boring due to its more adult themed content, would be playing on the radio. That jazzy theme song becoming a Top-40 hit recording this summer of '62.

And after about the third or fourth time of this happening, I remember how in the mind of this kid, that '59 Chevy station wagon seemed for just a moment or two to magically transform itself into a shiny new Chevy Corvette, and imagined Pop as the character Buz and myself as the character Tod from that TV show.

(...sorry, I know I've told this story before around here, but this childhood memory of mine is such a pleasant one that I was again moved to relay it one more time)

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Last week I made a comment about this show. I posted it above yours.

I'm sorry to say that my hero Buz was a real jerk in this one, A jerk and a fool.

I love the part where Tod said he would hold Jeremy Slate's coat while he beat up Buz.

This was a real "Macho" episode --one of those a man's got to do what a man's got to do or whatever. LOL

But some of that was whittled down with the young woman having all that skill and teaching Buz the ropes of surfing.

Now I think I'd give the episode a different title. One of Brian Wilson's recent solo albums sounds apropos: No Pier Pressure.

On this album they include an old recording of Brian singing a man's got to do what a man's got to do song called "In the back of my mind".

Yeah, Buz got a bit out of control in this one. As someone said, it was the greenie's responsibility as he was the one who decided to challenge the king. Buz was put off by Hob's indifference to the kid's death, but he should have left it there, instead of going into revenge mode. Still I must admit the shots he took at Hob in the restaurant were kind of amusing. Zing, zing, zing. That's what upset Tod, who was a bit of a wienie too. There definitely was a macho vibe, especially after Buz wiped out the first time and then went back later with no one but the unseen Hob around to prove that he could shoot the pier. Then at the end the two bullfighters shake hands. One thing that annoyed me was Buz went into the surfer hangout twice and pulled the plug on the jukebox. Yeah the music was kind of lame, but still.

All over Oklahoma,

And down Californee way,

The Joads are waxing their surf boards,

Surfin' U.S.A. 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


© 2019 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...