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5 hours ago, Dargo said:

It's the summer of '62. My father and his then 10 year old son (me) packed up the family's '59 Chevy station wagon to head back to his old stomping grounds of Indianapolis IN to visit his family members who never moved out to L.A. after the war like he and his older sister Bess did. The route to be taken for most of the way and until we hit St. Louis would be of course Route 66.

As we headed through the California desert and into Arizona, I began to spot many an earth mover grading what will become that new, wider and more modern high-speed interstate road just off to the side of the old two lane road we're traveling upon.

I was in charge of navigation with those Rand McNally road maps on my lap, and also the radioman in charge of finding the next AM radio station on that Chevy's Delco radio which was centrally located on the dashboard and with that one lone oval shaped 9 inch speaker sitting up there in the sun and under that large curved windshield.

It seemed as we would get closer to the next little town along this ribbon of road and to the next little town's AM station, its signal would get stronger and clearer as we drove toward it and that Nelson Riddle-composed theme song from that TV show my parents would regularly watch on CBS, but which this then 10 year old would usually find somewhat boring due to its more adult themed content, would be playing on the radio. That jazzy theme song becoming a Top-40 hit recording this summer of '62.

And after about the third or fourth time of this happening, I remember how in the mind of this kid, that '59 Chevy station wagon seemed for just a moment or two to magically transform itself into a shiny new Chevy Corvette, and imagined Pop as the character Buz and myself as the character Tod from that TV show.

(...sorry, I know I've told this story before around here, but this childhood memory of mine is such a pleasant one that I was again moved to relay it one more time)

 

Where were you in '62? Now we know. Enjoyed your story, Dargo. One thing I remember about our family vacations is that my parents always had to leave around 7 in the morning. What way is that to start a summer vacation? My dad was thinking about driving out to California on vacation but he never did. I think he figured it would take too long. 

The waves may be bad that day, it may be cold out, the lifeguards may try to beat us down. But it don't matter. They can't lick us, they can't wipe us out, We'll be riding the waves forever 'cause...we're the surfers. Yes, we keep a surfin'.

 

 

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24 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Where were you in '62? Now we know. Enjoyed your story, Dargo. One thing I remember about our family vacations is that my parents always had to leave around 7 in the morning. What way is that to start a summer vacation? My dad was thinking about driving out to California on vacation but he never did. I think he figured it would take too long. 

The waves may be bad that day, it may be cold out, the lifeguards may try to beat us down. But it don't matter. They can't lick us, they can't wipe us out, We'll be riding the waves forever 'cause...we're the surfers. Yes, we keep a surfin'.

 

 

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"The girls dig the way the guys get all wiped out

With their feet in the air you can hear them shout

They're Not Afraid, not my boys

 They grit their teeth

They don't back down"-- Mike Love and Brian Wilson, All Summer Long

 

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10 hours ago, Vautrin said:

 One thing I remember about our family vacations is that my parents always had to leave around 7 in the morning. What way is that to start a summer vacation? My dad was thinking about driving out to California on vacation but he never did. I think he figured it would take too long. 

Our family "vacations" were always trips back "home" to northeast Louisiana (more like southern Ark than rest of LA).  Since my sister and I were born, raised and educated in coastal S.C. we always had to explain to our father even as adults that LA was not our "home."

We left before sunrise and drove until after sunset in the summer.  Then he would start looking for a motel. Only stopped when car needed gas or absolutely had to use rest room.   No interstates and damn few four lane highways across southern part of the South.

I have found it interesting  that the AM radios in my last several cars don't pick up squat compared to the 50's-70's.

I never took up surfing, although a few of my high school classmates did.

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16 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

"The girls dig the way the guys get all wiped out

With their feet in the air you can hear them shout

They're Not Afraid, not my boys

 They grit their teeth

They don't back down"-- Mike Love and Brian Wilson, All Summer Long

 

No offense but it's hard to come up with two less macho men than Love and Wilson. :)

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6 hours ago, TheCid said:

Our family "vacations" were always trips back "home" to northeast Louisiana (more like southern Ark than rest of LA).  Since my sister and I were born, raised and educated in coastal S.C. we always had to explain to our father even as adults that LA was not our "home."

We left before sunrise and drove until after sunset in the summer.  Then he would start looking for a motel. Only stopped when car needed gas or absolutely had to use rest room.   No interstates and damn few four lane highways across southern part of the South.

I have found it interesting  that the AM radios in my last several cars don't pick up squat compared to the 50's-70's.

I never took up surfing, although a few of my high school classmates did.

My parents weren't that bad. They would call it a day around 5 or 6 o'clock in the evening. Funny, I don't recall them ever making motel reservations. Guess they would just look for the vacancy sign. They might stop for gas and a snack but not a full lunch. We went to Florida a few times which was fun or to New York or North Carolina to visit relatives. It was on these trips that I was introduced to Howard Johnson's. I still miss that chain. I haven't listened to AM in a long time. I liked to go to the shore but never went surfing.

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Back on the road. The guys must have money to burn because now they're back in Chicago again after one week in southern California. Tod is working at the O'Hare Inn as a swimming instructor and Buz is taking the car to his new job at a supply warehouse. Here he meets Sam, a co-worker who, like a more famous TV character, is short, stocky, and balding. Sam is smitten with a woman who he talks to over the phone but has never met in person. One of their topics of discussion is Brian Aherne! Buz and Tod convince him to take it to the next level and meet her in person. Sam being shy, Tod agrees to meet the woman in Sam's place. She turns out to be better looking and much younger than Sam. Naturally old lunkhead Tod falls in love with her. Buz and Tod practically force Sam to go to the telephone message service where she works. There it is discovered that the young lady is not the woman Sam talks to on the phone. She too is a substitute. Sam meets the real woman who is closer to his age and his plain looks. Having successfully played matchmakers, Tod and Buz head off to their next adventure. This is your typical schlub in love plot where some lonely soul finally finds a match. Sam was played by Sorrell Booke who played variations on this role in many TV shows and some movies, though he was usually not as whiny and needy as he was in the Route 66 episode.

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7 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

My parents weren't that bad. They would call it a day around 5 or 6 o'clock in the evening. Funny, I don't recall them ever making motel reservations. Guess they would just look for the vacancy sign. They might stop for gas and a snack but not a full lunch. We went to Florida a few times which was fun or to New York or North Carolina to visit relatives. It was on these trips that I was introduced to Howard Johnson's. I still miss that chain. I haven't listened to AM in a long time. I liked to go to the shore but never went surfing.

My father was too cheap to stay at a chain motel or eat at a chain restaurant.

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1 hour ago, TheCid said:

My father was too cheap to stay at a chain motel or eat at a chain restaurant.

Not cheap, just careful with his money :). My father was fairly generous, though he wasn't a spendthrift. My mother was more on the cheapskate side, though not to extremes. So if I wanted something I usually went to good old dad. 

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2 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Back on the road. The guys must have money to burn because now they're back in Chicago again after one week in southern California. Tod is working at the O'Hare Inn as a swimming instructor and Buz is taking the car to his new job at a supply warehouse. Here he meets Sam, a co-worker who, like a more famous TV character, is short, stocky, and balding. Sam is smitten with a woman who he talks to over the phone but has never met in person. One of their topics of discussion is Brian Aherne! Buz and Tod convince him to take it to the next level and meet her in person. Sam being shy, Tod agrees to meet the woman in Sam's place. She turns out to be better looking and much younger than Sam. Naturally old lunkhead Tod falls in love with her. Buz and Tod practically force Sam to go to the telephone message service where she works. There it is discovered that the young lady is not the woman Sam talks to on the phone. She too is a substitute. Sam meets the real woman who is closer to his age and his plain looks. Having successfully played matchmakers, Tod and Buz head off to their next adventure. This is your typical schlub in love plot where some lonely soul finally finds a match. Sam was played by Sorrell Booke who played variations on this role in many TV shows and some movies, though he was usually not as whiny and needy as he was in the Route 66 episode.

You encouraged me to look for my Route 66 DVDs, which could have been difficult because I recently moved. But much to my surprise they were by the TV set with my Perry Mason's and my Untouchables.

So I've got the first season and I'm starting over from scratch. So I'm currently watching George Kennedy at The Sawmill.

I got these DVDs a long time ago, so I don't know what the new ones look like now. But I had forgotten how cute these were.

They look like a tire with an expensive hubcap. And the box of course has a map of Route 66 with color photos of the boys.

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God said to Abraham "kill me a son".

Abe said "man, you must be puttin' me on".

God said "Abe", Abe said "what?"

God said "you can do what you want, but next time you see me comin', you better run".

Abe said "where you want this killin' done?"

God said "out on highway sixty six".

 

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4 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

You encouraged me to look for my Route 66 DVDs, which could have been difficult because I recently moved. But much to my surprise they were by the TV set with my Perry Mason's and my Untouchables.

So I've got the first season and I'm starting over from scratch. So I'm currently watching George Kennedy at The Sawmill.

I got these DVDs a long time ago, so I don't know what the new ones look like now. But I had forgotten how cute these were.

They look like a tire with an expensive hubcap. And the box of course has a map of Route 66 with color photos of the boys.

Rural Mis sis sippi. Not where I'd start a trip, but to each their own. This is the first of many small town has a secret episodes. Not to go into detail, but I found it rather unbelievable that everyone in this town would be so scared fifteen years after the "incident." I have so many books and CDs that I really don't have time for much else. Speaking of Perry Mason, Paul did a solid tonight. Perry and Paul visit a poor, down on his luck guy who is even out of cigarettes. Paul gives him one out of his pack and Perry lights it. As they are going, Paul leaves his pack of ciggies on the guy's table. What a mensch. 

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On 6/28/2019 at 11:44 PM, Vautrin said:

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Yes, life is rough out on old Route 66.

 

 

 

 

Mon cher Vautrin:

Did your syndicated Route 66 start on season 2?

I just finished the first episode of the first season, with guest stars Everett Sloane, Patty McCormack, George Kennedy, and Whit Bissell.

I assume everybody has seen it so there's no point in going through the summary. But since this was the first episode it must have really set people on fire.

It has a little bit of everything in it.

Patty McCormack was such a good child actress who they tried to propel into an adult career like Natalie Wood. She appears later in the series as a young woman oh, I think as a Runaway.

As far as the first episode is concerned often writers like Silliphant, Reginald Rose and Rod Serling had to use all kinds of covers to discuss Jim Crow, black lynching and such in the south. And since this one really does concern bigotry, a different sort of bigotry; none the less I think that is maybe what was going on here.

I also got a kind of a "East of Eden" feeling between the son and the father. But since it was an hour long TV show the whole thing was resolved rather fast.

And Malcolm Atterbury is a character actor that everybody has seen but nobody talks about. He blended in with it the real country folk down there.

Our second episode is with Thomas Gomez and Janice Rule on a shrimp boat in Louisiana. These people seem to have French ancestral ethnicity. And Tod is down there because he was invited by a friend to work on his boat.

We'll see how that one ends up.

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5 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Rural Mis sis sippi. Not where I'd start a trip, but to each their own. This is the first of many small town has a secret episodes. Not to go into detail, but I found it rather unbelievable that everyone in this town would be so scared fifteen years after the "incident." I have so many books and CDs that I really don't have time for much else. Speaking of Perry Mason, Paul did a solid tonight. Perry and Paul visit a poor, down on his luck guy who is even out of cigarettes. Paul gives him one out of his pack and Perry lights it. As they are going, Paul leaves his pack of ciggies on the guy's table. What a mensch. 

I've been watching The Return of Perry Mason and I really like Della Street's son.

The black and white one starts in 15 minutes so I've got to run.

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

 

Mon cher Vautrin:

Did your syndicated Route 66 start on season 2?

I just finished the first episode of the first season, with guest stars Everett Sloane, Patty McCormack, George Kennedy, and Whit Bissell.

I assume everybody has seen it so there's no point in going through the summary. But since this was the first episode it must have really set people on fire.

It has a little bit of everything in it.

Patty McCormack was such a good child actress who they tried to propel into an adult career like Natalie Wood. She appears later in the series as a young woman oh, I think as a Runaway.

As far as the first episode is concerned often writers like Silliphant, Reginald Rose and Rod Serling had to use all kinds of covers to discuss Jim Crow, black lynching and such in the south. And since this one really does concern bigotry, a different sort of bigotry; none the less I think that is maybe what was going on here.

I also got a kind of a "East of Eden" feeling between the son and the father. But since it was an hour long TV show the whole thing was resolved rather fast.

And Malcolm Atterbury is a character actor that everybody has seen but nobody talks about. He blended in with it the real country folk down there.

Our second episode is with Thomas Gomez and Janice Rule on a shrimp boat in Louisiana. These people seem to have French ancestral ethnicity. And Tod is down there because he was invited by a friend to work on his boat.

We'll see how that one ends up.

No, they started at the beginning, season one. Of course there are extra commercials that cut into the original episodes. Patty was certainly more sympathetic than she was as Rhoda Penmark. And I could see where they might disguise the lynching of a black man as something else. That was likely too much for TV in 1960. Yes, Sloan demanded his son tow the line and the son didn't want to. I believe that Janice Rule was in three episodes of the show and I think they all involved boating. Hey, get me that boating actress.

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

I've been watching The Return of Perry Mason and I really like Della Street's son.

The black and white one starts in 15 minutes so I've got to run.

I never was interested in the later Perry Mason TV movies. I'm sure they're entertaining enough. As a younger person I just wasn't into them. I'm in Dodge City with Matt Dillon. I'm going to stay close by him as he always comes out on top.

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14 hours ago, TheCid said:

My father was too cheap to stay at a chain motel or eat at a chain restaurant.

Well since the homogenization "chaining" of American businesses, it's become the hipster thing to patronize non-chain establishments. I've been doing that for 3 decades now, since managing editor of ROADSIDE magazine in the 90's. It's actually quite inspiring meeting the actual OWNERS of a business- like a vintage motel with the smell of curry or incense wafting instead of cigarettes, hearing of their family dreams of success in America. 

I never eat at chain restaurants. What a bore-you may as well stay home, there's one  of those there too.

So I just got season 1 of RT 66 from the library and am watching it too. (MrTiki complains I never get "into" any series- I don't like swearing/violence so most modern series are OUT)

I LOVE RT 66. I love the two different personalities of the principles and the "situations" they have found along the way. They are superbly written, along the veins of Andy Griffith crossed with Twilight Zone; the dialogue is natural & believable, the situations unique and the resolution is not obvious.

Wow. Why aren't ALL TV series so well written?

We're off tomorrow for 10 days exploring VT, a classic tourist state with very few chains....I'll let you know if we bump into Patty McCormack.

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I used to live in southern Vermont. They had the usual chain fast food joints one would find anywhere else. Of course they also have those patented charming local restaurants.

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Tod and Buz are still in Chicago. Both are now working as hospitality coordinators at the O'Hare Inn making sure that guests are happy and satisfied. Buz is assigned to a convention of executive secretaries, Tod to a trio of horror film stars who are in town thinking about putting out a new monster flick. Of course Tod really wanted Buz's assignment. This is the episode with Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre, and Lon Chaney as the guest stars. I recall seeing this in one of those monster movie magazines before I even knew what Route 66 was. Trying to decide what type of monster would sell today, Lon is sent out in his wolfman makeup to see if he can still scare people, mostly the young secretaries. He does as they all faint away as soon as they see him. There is also another plot about one of the secretaries who mopes around because she is in love with her boss, but she thinks he doesn't care about her. Naturally he shows up at the close of the episode declaring his endless love. Not much to this one, but it's fun to see the three horror stars together. I believe Lorre died not long after this episode. Jeannine Reilly, probably best know for her role in Petticoat Junction, plays the lovelorn secretary. I forget to mention that Tod is the one who sics Lon to get into his wolfman getup so he can mess up Buz's work as much as possible.

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17 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Rural Mis sis sippi. Not where I'd start a trip, but to each their own. This is the first of many small town has a secret episodes. Not to go into detail, but I found it rather unbelievable that everyone in this town would be so scared fifteen years after the "incident." I have so many books and CDs that I really don't have time for much else. Speaking of Perry Mason, Paul did a solid tonight. Perry and Paul visit a poor, down on his luck guy who is even out of cigarettes. Paul gives him one out of his pack and Perry lights it. As they are going, Paul leaves his pack of ciggies on the guy's table. What a mensch. 

I re-watched this one recently and still don't like it very much.  I thought it was an unusual way to start a series titled "Route 66," although they explain the deviation into southern Mississippi which explains the next couple of episodes in New Orleans area.

Do you recall the Perry Mason episode to which you refer? Have all the DVD's and watch them frequently, but do not recall this one.  Paul is probably my favorite character in the series.

17 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Patty McCormack was such a good child actress who they tried to propel into an adult career like Natalie Wood. She appears later in the series as a young woman oh, I think as a Runaway.

As far as the first episode is concerned often writers like Silliphant, Reginald Rose and Rod Serling had to use all kinds of covers to discuss Jim Crow, black lynching and such in the south. And since this one really does concern bigotry, a different sort of bigotry; none the less I think that is maybe what was going on here.

 

Patty McCormack's role as a sort of runaway in another episode is much more entertaining to me.  Of course, it also has a good deal more humor in it and she has a much larger role.

I do not think the writers/producers/etc. were trying to say anything about Jim Crow or black lynching in the first episode.  I think it was purely about a man who lost his son to a German in WW  II and took revenge on a German POW who fell into his hands.  1960 was not that far after WW II for this to be the sole reason for the plot.

9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

So I just got season 1 of RT 66 from the library and am watching it too. 

I LOVE RT 66. I love the two different personalities of the principles and the "situations" they have found along the way. They are superbly written, along the veins of Andy Griffith crossed with Twilight Zone; the dialogue is natural & believable, the situations unique and the resolution is not obvious.

 

I really did not get into Route 66 until I purchased the DVD set in mid-90's.  At first I was disappointed because of how serious it was, but then as I watched more I really got into it.  Have to admit that I do like the less serious episodes more.  Episode one is particularly dark and even seems "darkly" shot.  Could be the DVD copying, but even the daytime scenes seemed to be overcast.

The two leads, even with Lincoln Case later, do play off each other very well.  One thing I found amusing is how often Tod is more often the one after women and Martin Milner's family was traveling with him during the shooting.

18 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Tod and Buz are still in Chicago. Both are now working as hospitality coordinators at the O'Hare Inn making sure that guests are happy and satisfied. Buz is assigned to a convention of executive secretaries, Tod to a trio of horror film stars who are in town thinking about putting out a new monster flick. Of course Tod really wanted Buz's assignment. This is the episode with Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre, and Lon Chaney as the guest stars. I recall seeing this in one of those monster movie magazines before I even knew what Route 66 was. Trying to decide what type of monster would sell today, Lon is sent out in his wolfman makeup to see if he can still scare people, mostly the young secretaries. He does as they all faint away as soon as they see him. There is also another plot about one of the secretaries who mopes around because she is in love with her boss, but she thinks he doesn't care about her. Naturally he shows up at the close of the episode declaring his endless love. Not much to this one, but it's fun to see the three horror stars together. I believe Lorre died not long after this episode. Jeannine Reilly, probably best know for her role in Petticoat Junction, plays the lovelorn secretary. I forget to mention that Tod is the one who sics Lon to get into his wolfman getup so he can mess up Buz's work as much as possible.

This episode was originally broadcast a few days before Halloween.  I think it may be the only episode with a holiday tie-in.

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1 hour ago, TheCid said:

I re-watched this one recently and still don't like it very much.  I thought it was an unusual way to start a series titled "Route 66," although they explain the deviation into southern Mississippi which explains the next couple of episodes in New Orleans area.

Do you recall the Perry Mason episode to which you refer? Have all the DVD's and watch them frequently, but do not recall this one.  Paul is probably my favorite character in the series.

 

This episode was originally broadcast a few days before Halloween.  I think it may be the only episode with a holiday tie-in.

That first episode is certainly pretty depressing especially for the beginning of the series. Luckily things would get brighter, how could they not. What I found somewhat amusing is that Sloane is not exactly physically prepossessing, so I suppose the financial hold he had over the townsfolk was the main thing. Otherwise just about anyone could have snapped him in two like a twig. I'll have to look the title up, it's either from the first or second season. Perry's client is the father's son who was accused of stealing some valuable antique cross and later killing the guy he supposedly stole it from. Just as they are leaving the father in his crummy room, Paul leaves him his pack of cigarettes on the table. I always got a kick out of Paul, especially when he was hypnotized by some cute gal and forgot what he was doing. Route 66 might have had a Christmas time episode, a lot of TV shows do.

 

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47 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

That first episode is certainly pretty depressing especially for the beginning of the series. Luckily things would get brighter, how could they not. What I found somewhat amusing is that Sloane is not exactly physically prepossessing, so I suppose the financial hold he had over the townsfolk was the main thing. Otherwise just about anyone could have snapped him in two like a twig. I'll have to look the title up, it's either from the first or second season. Perry's client is the father's son who was accused of stealing some valuable antique cross and later killing the guy he supposedly stole it from. Just as they are leaving the father in his crummy room, Paul leaves him his pack of cigarettes on the table. I always got a kick out of Paul, especially when he was hypnotized by some cute gal and forgot what he was doing. Route 66 might have had a Christmas time episode, a lot of TV shows do.

 

OK, I remember the episode now. It is one I don't watch that often.

If Route 66 had a Christmas show, I don't recall it.

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5 hours ago, TheCid said:

OK, I remember the episode now. It is one I don't watch that often.

If Route 66 had a Christmas show, I don't recall it.

The reason I mention the TV writers in terms of the lynching and that episode is because they had a reputation for wanting to write about racism and Jim Crow but they had to cover it with other subjects in the classic TV era.

That may not have been the case with this particular episode, but that was their reputation.

Otherwise I wouldn't have mentioned it.

Historically that's been the issue with a number of Cinema artists. Fritz Lang's first Hollywood film in America was supposed to be about Jim Crow lynchings, but that was going to be impossible in 1936, so MGM made "Fury" about the lynching of a man who Spencer Tracy could play the part of.

 Fritz Lang was the most outstanding director of the pre- World War II German Cinema.

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5 hours ago, TheCid said:

OK, I remember the episode now. It is one I don't watch that often.

If Route 66 had a Christmas show, I don't recall it.

The Case of the Spanish Cross. It is on the dull side, not one of those lowlife titillating late 1950s episodes that I find so enjoyable. Maybe they didn't do a Christmas themed show. I figured two all-American boys would have. I'll keep a lookout just in case.

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On 7/17/2019 at 10:14 PM, Vautrin said:

The Case of the Spanish Cross. It is on the dull side, not one of those lowlife titillating late 1950s episodes that I find so enjoyable. Maybe they didn't do a Christmas themed show. I figured two all-American boys would have. I'll keep a lookout just in case.

Well, I finally finished the second episode of the first season: A Lance of Straw, again written by Silliphant. This one, believe it or not, is an allegory based on a Shakespearean play, The Taming of the Shrew.

So now we're into English literature. WOW!

The Shrew in this case is Janice Rule who is a  young Cajun woman who has inherited her father's mantle as a shrimp boat captain, which he got from her grandfather before him. Men are wary of her because she intends to be a captain just like her father and doesn't have time to be bothered with men. A local shrimp boat Captain is a would-be Suitor from the Cajun community, but she has violently rejected him.

Her name is Charlotte and she has obtained her shrimp boat from Tod's friend, who initially had asked him to work on it. After a basic misunderstanding, Charlotte invites Tod and Buz to work her boat and help her catch shrimp.

As simple as that may be, they are harassed first by her would-be Suitor who is jealous and then Charlotte herself is harassed by  Buz, who is a chauvinist, just like her Suitor Jean.

Even though this is 1960, laughingly Jean calls himself a pig even repeats the word in pejorative French, cochon, and that seems to be before the term was in the popular vernacular for sexist men.

The rest of the episode concerns itself with Charlotte and her crew catching shrimp despite an upcoming hurricane.

Jean follows her out into the sea but loses his boat in the process and becomes more interesting finally to Charlotte.

Surprisingly, the chauvinistic Buz, who tries to beat down Charlotte's Independence and tenacious leadership at every opportunity, is seemingly crushed when Charlotte goes back to the local captain.

Charlotte's playing the stereotype of the Katharine Hepburn independent, intelligent woman, which usually frightens men-- even some still today. While Buz and the Cajun Captain are playing The Stereotype of the men who have to dominate women in order to prove their manhood. ROFL

Buz even makes fun of Charlotte for reading about strong independent women in history like Joan of Arc, Queen Elizabeth and Florence Nightingale.

The funniest part in the episode is when Buz asks Charlotte what she's going to be cooking on the boat and Charlotte informs him that she's a captain; he's going to be the cook. LOL

*You can look for veteran Hollywood character actor Thomas Gomez as the Godfather of the Cajun shrimp boat community who tries to bring both Charlotte and Jean together by tempering both of their personalities.

**Wonderful cinematography in this episode by Ernest Haller who, believe it or not, won the Academy Award for "Gone with the Wind". So It's no wonder that Tod and Buz  in that Corvette look so good on Route 66!

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