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Hey TCM. How about celebrating Canada Day, eh?


Bogie56
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July 1

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Still no Canada Day TCM?  What about featuring some of these people on July 1: Norman Jewison, Marie Dressler, Walter Pidgeon, Mary Pickford, Fay Wray, Walter Huston, John Candy, Glenn Ford, Deanna Durbin, Colleen Dewhurst, Lorne Green, William Shatner, Martin Short, James Cameron, Michael J. Fox, Keanu Reeves, Norma Shearer, Christopher Plummer, Donald Sutherland, Leslie Nielsen, Laura Linney, Chief Dan George, Graham Greene, Gary Farmer, David Cronenberg, Denis Villeneuve, Denys Arcand, Francis Mankiewicz, Hume Cronyn, Yvonne De Carlo, Brendan Fraser, Alexis Smith, Genevieve Bujold, Ryan Gosling, Barry Pepper, Catherine O'Hara, Jim Carrey, Mike Myers, Seth Rogen, Jay Baruchel, Ellen Page, Anna Paquin, Bruce Greenwood, Raymond Massey, Ivan Reitman, Rody Piper, Kate Nelligan and Raymond Burr.

Or even some Canadian films!
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2 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

July 1

Still no Canada Day TCM?  What about featuring some of these people on July 1: 

Or even some Canadian films!

HMmmmm........

Canadian films might seem less repetitious.  ;)  

Wouldn't bother ME if they started with THE SILENT PARTNER( '78) 

Sepiatone

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What about TCM Canada? Is that still around? I don't know anything about it except someone occasionally comes on here and points all these schedule changes that have to be made because, I guess, of rights issues with Canadian television. But does it ever show any specifically Canadian programming completely different from the American schedule?

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6 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Or even some Canadian films!

I say only some Canadian films.    I.e. for me a country tribute on a movies station should focus on movies produced in the county and not actors that just were born there or films just set in said country (but were produced by American studios\producers).

I have always wondered why Canada doesn't have a more robust film industry.  Of course maybe they do and I'm just ignorant?    

E.g. what are the Kane,  Casablanca or GWTW films of Canada?     It would be great if TCM was to show them.

Anyhow, going to a Canada party this afternoon.    

 

 

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6 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Yeah, how about:

Anne Of Green Gables

The 49th Parallel

Rose Marie (gotta have a mountie movie in there)

"Ft. Vengeance" would be a candidate for a 'mountie' movie.  It was shown on TCM last month (I'd never seen it before).  It will be shown in August too as part of Rita Moreno's SUTS day.  Also, "The Wild North" with Stewart Granger, Wendell Corey, and Cyd Charise was set and shot (I think) in Canada.

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duddy_kravitz.jpg

The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (1974) is my personal favourite Canadian film.  It stars Richard Dreyfuss, Micheline Lanctot, Randy Quaid, Joe Silver and Joseph Wiseman.  It was directed by Ted Kotcheff and adapted from a Mordecai Richler novel that takes place in post war Montreal.  Dreyfuss was on hand a few years ago when a restored version of the film was presented in Cannes.

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Richler has had a few other Montreal novels adapted to film too.  Joshua then and Now (1985) starring James Woods and Alan Alda (his finest screen performance IMO) and also directed by Ted Kotcheff.

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Then there was Richler's Barney's Version (2010) starring Paul Giamatti, Dustin Hoffman and Rosamund Pike.

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2 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

The most important and influential Canadian film of all time is probably Nanook of the North.

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I think this would make a great double bill with the awfully hard to find Kabloonak (1994).   It is about Flaherty's making of Nanook and stars Nanook's own grandson, Adamie Inukpuk as the famed Inuit.  Charles Dance plays Flaherty.  Playing directors seems to be his forte.  It features one of the most exhilarating Polar Bear hunts ever.   Without giving too much away - think of Jaws turning the tables. 

MV5BOGVkYWQ4YjgtNDEyMC00NjM1LTlhMjgtZjg3

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2 hours ago, BrownShoes said:

There are so many Canadian-produced movies from the 1970's through the 1990's that would be wonderful to see, but aren't available anywhere much.

How I wish TCM would hunt them down. There's at least 100 I'm longing to see.

Yes. This idea really shouldn't be limited to one day. They could easily do a month-long spotlight on Canadian productions and include 20-25 titles.

I'd pick ones like BLACK CHRISTMAS (1974), JESUS OF MONTREAL (1989) and MY WINNIPEG (2007) to name a few.

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TCM should have a Canada tribute by scheduling films viewers believe are associated with Canada.

Then,  due to rights-issues,   don't show the most Canadian of these films in Canada. 

Oh wait,,,,  they better not do that since I really like Ms. W,  and I hate to see her go off the rails.

 

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13 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

TCM should have a Canada tribute by scheduling films viewers believe are associated with Canada.

Then,  due to rights-issues,   don't show the most Canadian of these films in Canada. 

Oh wait,,,,  they better not do that since I really like Ms. W,  and I hate to see her go off the rails.

 

Yes, and choose a replacement for Canada that has nothing to do with the tribute to Canada!

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I have only done one of the TCM programming challenges.  Lydecker gave me a lot of help in getting going.  They are very tough to do but rewarding if you have the time.  In each challenge you are allowed only a small number of premieres so you have to use them sparingly over the coarse of your week's lineup.

First comes your line-up which is followed by programming notes.  Here is a day that I put together for that challenge ...

——————————Saturday, July 1, 2017————————

It’s Canada Day! - Canadians at the Movies  

6:00    49th Parallel (1941) Raymond Massey, Eric Portman.  Dir: Michael Powell.  Columbia/Criterion.  122m.,  P/S

8:15 AM  Big Red (1962) Walter Pidgeon, Emile Genest.  Dir: Norman Tokar.  Walt Disney.  89m., Premiere

9:45 AM  The Happy Time (1952)  Charles Boyer, Louis Jourdan.  Dir: Richard Fleischer.  Columbia.  94m.,  P/S

11:30 AM  Mon Oncle Antoine (1971) Jacques Gagnon, Jean Duceppe.  Dir: Claude Jutra.  NFB/Criterion. 104m., P/S

1:15 PM  Rose Marie (1954) Ann Blyth, Howard Keel.  Dir: Mervyn LeRoy.  MGM. 104m.,  P/S

3:00 PM  Eskimo (1933) Mala, Joe Sawyer.  Dir: W.S. Van Dyke.  MGM.  117m.,  P/S

5:00 PM  My Best Girl (1927) Mary Pickford, Charles “Buddy” Riogers.  Dir: Sam Taylor.  United Artists.  80m., P/S

6:30 PM  One Hundred Men and A Girl (1937) Deanna Durbin, Leopold Stokowski.  Dir: Henry Koster.  Universal.  84m.  P/S

The (Canadian) Essentials 

8:00  PM  Dinner at Eight (1933)  Marie Dressler, John Barrymore.  Dir: George Cukor.  MGM.  111m., P/S

10:00 PM  The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (1974)  Richard Dreyfuss, Micheline Lanctot.  Dir: Ted Kotcheff.  Paramount.  120m., Premiere

12:00 AM  Agnes of God (1985) Jane Fonda, Anne Bancroft.  Dir: Norman Jewison.  Columbia.  98m.,  P/S

1:45 AM  Neighbours (1952)  Grant Munro, Jean Paul Ladoceur.  Dir: Norman McLaren.  NFB Short Subject.  8m.,

(Canadian) Underground

2:00 AM  Amanita Pestilens (1963) Genevieve Bujold, Jacques Labreque.  Dir: Rene Bonniere.  Crawley Films.  79m.,  

3:30 AM  Universe (1960)  Documentary short.  Dir: Roman Kroiter, Colin Low.  NFB Short Subject.  29m.,

4:00 AM  Goin' Down the Road (1970)  Doug McGrath, Paul Bradley.  Dir: Donald Shebib.  Alliance Films.  90m.,    

5:40 AM The Cat Came Back (1988)  Animated Short.  Dir: Cordell Barker.  NFB., 8m.

----------------------- MY NOTES -------------------------

Saturday, July, 2017

It’s Canada Day! - Canadians at the Movies

Rise and shine with Michael Powell’s 49th Parallel (1941) which features Canuck, Raymond Massey and everyone’s favourite French-Canadian, Laurence Olivier.

This is followed by the TCM Premiere of Walt Disney’s Big Red (1962) starring Canucks, Walter Pidgeon and Emile Genest.  The Quebec scenery is a standout in this.

Included also is one of our favourite singing Mountie movies, Rose Marie (1954).

Then it’s off to the far frozen north with W.S. Van Dyke’s little seen, Eskimo (1933)

My Best Girl (1927) and One Hundred Men and a Girl (1937) feature two of Canada’s most famous actresses, Mary Pickford and Deanna Durbin respectively.

The (Canadian) Essentials

Dinner at Eight (1933) with Marie Dressler from Coburg, Ontario.

One of the very best Canadian feature films has its TCM Premiere at 10 p.m.: Ted Kotcheff’s, Montreal based The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravtiz (1974) with a young Richard Dreyfuss.  Jack Warden, Joe Silver and Denholm Elliott are stand outs in the cast.

This is followed by Norman Jewison’s Agnes of God which also takes place in Quebec.

Nieghbours (1952) is a very famous stop motion short subject by Norman McLaren.

Tonight’s underground selection features the TCM Premiere (exempt) Amanita Pestilens (1963) with Genevieve Bujold in her film debut.

The Oscar nominated short subject Universe (1960) was apparently closely scrutinized by Stanley Kubrick when prepping 2001: A Space Odyssey.  You can see the influence its matte drawings had on 2001 and Canada’s, Douglas Rain, the voice of HAL 9000 is the narrator.

It is followed by Donald Shebib’s iconic Goin’ Down the Road (1970).  Fans of SCTV will recognize this as a subject of a Joe Flaherty, John Candy parody.

The week concludes with the award winning National Film Board animated short subject, The Cat Came Back (1988).

 
 

 

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1 hour ago, Fedya said:

All Aboat Eve.

I know this comment is intended to be funny (at least to some Americans who actually think Canadians pronounce "about" this way) but as a Canuck who has lived in the Toronto area my entire life I would like to say that I have never heard anyone pronounce this word in this manner. Perhaps some Canadians have (it's a big country) but sure as heck not where I live.

As for the topic at hand, I would like to recommend the Canadian made WHY ROCK THE BOAT? (1974), a comedy-drama about the newspaper business in 1947 Montreal. It deals with a naive cub reporter (Stuart Gillard) working for a paper run by a tyrannical publisher. He just wants to get along and do anything but rock the boat but, at the same time, develops a serious crush as a union-supporting reporter and reluctantly gets involved in her cause. Gillard reminds one of a young Jimmy Stewart.

The film is very strong in period atmosphere and is, above all, amidst the various humourous incidents, an effective study of human interactions.

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11 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

HMmmmm........

Canadian films might seem less repetitious.  ;)  

Wouldn't bother ME if they started with THE SILENT PARTNER( '78) 

And then followed with that National Film Board of Canada Animation fest from a while back.

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luck-ginger-shaw.png

Speaking of the newspaper business, Tom here is a very good one The Luck of Ginger Coffey (1964).  It stars Robert Shaw and Mary Ure and is directed by Irvin Kirshner.  It depicts sixties Montreal really well.  Cold!  It was produced by Budge Crawley when there really was no feature film business in Canada and IMO is one of Robert Shaw's best screen performances.

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Despite being Canadian, the only Canadian movie I truly know off the top of my head is the duology of Bon Cop, Bad Cop, which is very Canadian. I won't go into it but it works whether you watch it in English or French, and unfortunately it's still too recent for TCM to show. I would be happier than a Canuck with authentic poutine if TCM showed some old Canadian classics on Canada Day.

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3 hours ago, TomJH said:

I know this comment [Fedya's "All Aboat Eve" quip] is intended to be funny (at least to some Americans who actually think Canadians pronounce "about" this way) but as a Canuck who has lived in the Toronto area my entire life I would like to say that I have never heard anyone pronounce this word in this manner. Perhaps some Canadians have (it's a big country) but sure as heck not where I live.

Sorry Tom, but yes, while visiting my "Ma"(birth mother) up in Kelowna BC over the past dozen years, I heard many a Canadian pronounce the word "about" as "aboat", including many of my "blood relatives" up there. And so, perhaps this sort of thing is more a western Canada thing.

(...oh and besides, AT LEAST Fedya here didn't say "All ABOOT Eve", RIGHT?!...'cause as you know, NO Canadian says that, as THAT is more a Scottish pronunciation of this word, and which it seems is something many of us Yanks ARE in fact mistaken aboot, err, aboat, err, ABOUT!!!)  ;)

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Just got back from the Canadian day party;   I feel you Canadians here let me down since none of you told me to wear red!  

I also found out that this couple, who my wife knows from the gym,  has been hosting this since 2005.   So next year I will be dressed ALL in red!!!

 

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