Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
Det Jim McLeod

Your Choice For 1968 Best Director Oscar

Recommended Posts

Choose who you would have voted for from the actual nominees with your reason why.

THE NOMINEES

Anthony Harvey for "The Lion In Winter"

Stanley Kubrick for "2001 A Space Odyssey"

Gillo Pontecorvo for "The Battle For Algiers"

Carol Reed for "Oliver"*

Franco Zefferelli for "Romeo And Juliet"

*= actual winner

 

I would have to go with Kubrick on this one. He created a literal out of this world experience with this film. It is one of the most unique films ever made, some have tried to imitate it but never gotten close.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree.  And lo, these 51 years later, I'm STILL dazzled by how advanced for the times the special effects were. 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oscar usually goes with the money--Titanic, Bridge Over the River Kwai, Gone with the Wind etc.

(But sometimes they go with a cause celebre/ or a cultural little movie).

I personally prefer the direction of actors in Lion in Winter, but Stanley Kubrick created something Far Beyond explicit Direction, certainly an amazing feat.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went to see Oliver! at the movies back then.

it is respectively a great Charles Dickens adaptation and musical at the same time.

so I say Carol Reed.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kubrick.

Oliver! is one of the 5 worst films to ever win Best Picture. Reed's win was a career nod.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As dull as some of the scenes in 2001 are and although the film isn't all that satisfying as a whole, Kubrick still deserved the Best Director award.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd go with Stanley Kubrick - his film is an amazing achievement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to say that even though if Oliver! was starting 10 minutes from now on TCM, I probably wouldn't watch it, the film deserves some credit for its staggering coordination of presentation. Look at that scene where Oliver and the Artful Dodger are walking around London and Dodger is singing "I'd Do Anything", and there are a thousand people moving about representing all the various professions of the common man (and woman). Butchers appear to carving actual slabs of meat. Items are being carted about in all sorts of directions - ladders, baskets, horses, carriages - every actor knew precisely where he or she was moving and how long to take to get there, and Oliver and Dodger sail through it all, oblivious, each extra stepping aside at precise last possible moment. And the grimy, gritty look of the costumes and the buildings and the faces and hands and all those thousands of object being moved in all sorts of directions. There's something really amazing about all that effort in an era before they could just CGI that stuff. I don't know how much credit the director deserves for all that, but he/she certainly gets the blame if it doesn't go off right.

Having said all that, however, my vote is for Kubrick.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

I would like to say that even though if Oliver! was starting 10 minutes from now on TCM, I probably wouldn't watch it, the film deserves some credit for its staggering coordination of presentation. Look at that scene where Oliver and the Artful Dodger are walking around London and Dodger is singing "I'd Do Anything", and there are a thousand people moving about representing all the various professions of the common man (and woman). Butchers appear to carving actual slabs of meat. Items are being carted about in all sorts of directions - ladders, baskets, horses, carriages - every actor knew precisely where he or she was moving and how long to take to get there, and Oliver and Dodger sail through it all, oblivious, each extra stepping aside at precise last possible moment.

The song is actually "Consider Yourself."

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, skimpole said:

The song is actually "Consider Yourself."

"Oliver!" the musical, Is a good adaptation from the novel by Lionel Bart and an entertaining movie --

but probably was much better on the stage.

As much as I like the musical oh, I always got the impression that some of the numbers in the movie were too long, too excessive and certainly could have been cut or edited a little bit better. But the drama with Oliver Reed playing Sykes works.

I would have loved to have seen Davy Jones on the London or Broadway stage as the Artful Dodger. In my mind, he was perfect for the part and every time I saw him, I first thought  of him as the Artful Dodger. He never lost that youthful attitude or appearance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, skimpole said:

The song is actually "Consider Yourself."

Welp ... that shows how long it's been since I've seen the movie!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stanley Kubrick and the rest aren't even close.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Oliver! is one of the 5 worst films to ever win Best Picture.

Crash, Broadway Melody, Gladiator, The Artist....Oliver??  😲

Remember, never let hyperbole lead you into the temptation of the E-word.

THE NOMINEES

Anthony Harvey for "The Lion In Winter"

Franco Zefferelli for "Romeo And Juliet"

Just by strange coincidence, only the night before, I was watching vintage reruns of Red Skelton on Amazon, from an episode the week before the '68 Oscars, with plenty of corny vintage topical opening-monologue jokes on the subject:

"Great movie, The Lion in Winter--Followed by that other movie about income tax, 'The Lyin' in April'....And Romeo & Juliet, I remember before we were married, my girl and I, when we went to the movies, we'd be just like Romeo & Juliet:  I'd be in the orchestra, and she'd be in the balcony."

(They don't age well, but still funny.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, EricJ said:

Crash, Broadway Melody, Gladiator, The Artist....Oliver??  😲

Remember, never let hyperbole lead you into the temptation of the E-word.

Oliver! is far worse than the other four you listed. In my opinion, naturally. The only BP winners that I liked less are Around the World in 80 Days and Gigi, followed closely by Sound of Music and Going My Way

BirdmanMoonlightCimarronThe Great Ziegfeld, and The Greatest Show on Earth round out my ten least favorite BP winners. I'll grant you that The Broadway Melody would follow, but I cut it some slack due to the era it's from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Did anyone consider JOHN CASSAVETES for FACES

Sepiatone

The Academy did not, but they did give supporting performance nominations for Seymour Cassel and Lynn Carlin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Oliver! is far worse than the other four you listed. In my opinion, naturally. The only BP winners that I liked less are Around the World in 80 Days and Gigi, followed closely by Sound of Music and Going My Way

BirdmanMoonlightCimarronThe Great Ziegfeld, and The Greatest Show on Earth round out my ten least favorite BP winners. I'll grant you that The Broadway Melody would follow, but I cut it some slack due to the era it's from.

I, OTOH, could watch Oliver a dozen times over (and, thanks to PlutoTV and the Columbia Orphans, now can) before the prospect of sitting through Tom Jones again.

My Fair Lady, The Sound of Music or Oliver, if I had to pick one movie to historically represent the glory days of the Great 60's Overproduced Roadshow Musical for Oscar posterity...Well, okay, Sound of Music would make it a tough call.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Did anyone consider JOHN CASSAVETES for FACES

Sepiatone

No.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite director that year, John Cassavetes, Ingmar Bergman, and Paul Newman, were not nominated.

Among the nominated directors, I would pick Anthony Harvey, with apologies to Carol Reed and Stanley Kubrick.

Anthony Harvey directs The Lion in Winter as a sharp, fast paced historical drama, not a lecture on English History. The characters wage war and wield swords, but their deadliest weapons are their wit and tongues. The movie is also an acting piece, and Harvey elicits fiery performances from most of the cast.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...