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Just saw the picture. Loved it. One question. Did Reni Santoni do a cameo as the theater manager?

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6 minutes ago, Ray Faiola said:

Just saw the picture. Loved it. One question. Did Reni Santoni do a cameo as the theater manager?

Not listed in the cast.

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

Not listed in the cast.

I  know. And someone else said it was listed in IMDB as Ramon Franco. I couldn't find the character listed in IMDB.

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4 hours ago, Ray Faiola said:

I  know. And someone else said it was listed in IMDB as Ramon Franco. I couldn't find the character listed in IMDB.

Here ya go. Ray. Yep, this is definitely the actor who played the theater manager, alright. I watched this film this past Friday, myself. 

His picture in his IMDb web page even appears to be a shot of him as this character in the film, and even though as it appears you've discovered, there is no role that's listed off to the right of his name on the IMDb cast list for this film:

https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0290632/?ref_=ttfc_fc_cl_t68

(...I'll sure give ya though that Mr. Franco here DOES look a lot like Reni Santoni alright)

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Another thing I loved about this movie was the "double lead" characters in it. Both Dicaprio and Pitt have large amounts of screen time, separate and together. I was thinking, if nominated for Oscars would both be for the Best Actor or maybe one would be lead and the other supporting?

It made me think of other times this happened:

Burt Lancaster and Montgomery Clift in "From Here To Eternity"

Richard Burton and Peter O'Toole in "Becket"

Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman in "Midnight Cowboy"

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12 hours ago, Dargo said:
16 hours ago, Ray Faiola said:

I  know. And someone else said it was listed in IMDB as Ramon Franco. I couldn't find the character listed in IMDB.

Here ya go. Ray. Yep, this is definitely the actor who played the theater manager, alright. I watched this film this past Friday, myself. 

I really enjoyed that scene, Sharon Tate goes to a theater to see herself in "The Wrecking Crew" and tells the cashier she in the movie. One of my favorite parts were when the cashier tries explaining to the manager that this was the girl from "Valley Of The Dolls" and his first reaction is "Patty Duke?"

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18 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I really enjoyed that scene, Sharon Tate goes to a theater to see herself in "The Wrecking Crew" and tells the cashier she in the movie. One of my favorite parts were when the cashier tries explaining to the manager that this was the girl from "Valley Of The Dolls" and his first reaction is "Patty Duke?"

Yea that was a nice touch, agree.

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On 7/27/2019 at 1:22 PM, Dargo said:

And, I'm now also wondering if he might have, what present day actor he might have cast as him, as I thought he did do a great job in this regard with the others.

I'd cast my favorite Joe Estevez as Brian Wilson. He has the same cuddly cute boyish look as Brian Wilson & is a really good actor.

wenn2355426.jpg

In LOVE & MERCY, Paul Dano played young Brian W. convincingly, but Joe Estevez would have been so much better than John Cusack as a mature Brian W.

On 7/27/2019 at 5:57 PM, CinemaInternational said:

The Wrecking Crew (1968)

You know THAT will come out of the woodwork in the wake of this movie.

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Seems Bruce Lee's daughter Shannon isn't so happy with the depiction of her father in this thing.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/movies/2019/07/30/once-upon-time-hollywood-quentin-tarantino-bruce-lee-ripped-by-daughter/1864901001/

One can of course understand her reasons here, however I believe the scene in which Brad Pitt's character Cliff has that "encounter" with Lee in this film was a terrific and entertaining way to establish the thought that the Cliff character could be one tough hombre when called upon to be so.

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On 7/27/2019 at 10:21 AM, Dargo said:

Re the autos - While watching the movie, I did think of all the new postings one could add to this forum's "That's a Nice Car" thread. And the primary anachronisms I noticed consisted of the (Pan Am) Boeing 747 not coming into regular fleet service until almost six months after the climax of the events depicted in the film(being the old airline employee that I was, I would of course notice this) and the Triumph motorcycle shown twice in the film, once just parked and the other time showing actor Tim Olyphant playing James Stacy riding away on it, is of a later than 1969 vintage. (but then again and once again, I would probably only notice this because of being the avid motorcyclist since 1967)

Re the street lights - There were and still are a few areas in L.A. which still have those old Art Deco styled lamps lined along the streets, if that is this was the style of street lamp you're referring to here. I do however remember that many areas of L.A. during the time this movie is set were replacing those with more modern lighting in order to brighten the roads for safety reasons, but in the last few decades and with a renewed interest in both architectural preservation and in the Art Deco movement, these conversions have pretty much ceased as far as I know.

Did anyone else notice how many times the 1957 Chevy Bel Air in turquoise with white top appeared in the film?  I counted at least 3 times.  I used to have one just like it. 

On 7/27/2019 at 4:57 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Just thought I should put out here that Tarantino went through Columbia's film collection and selected 10 Columbia titles that have some degree of bearing on the new film. looking at the 10, one is there because it has a clip in the new film, others because of the swinging late 60s feel, others because they have that B movie atmosphere that the main character is involved in. Here are the 10:

Gunman's Walk (1958) with Van Heflin and Tab Hunter

Battle of the Coral Sea (1959) with Cliff Robertson

Arizona Raiders (1965) with Audie Murphy

Hammerhead (1968) with Vince Edwards, Judy Geeson, and Diana Dors

The Wrecking Crew (1968) with Dean Martin, Sharon Tate, Nancy Kwan, Elke Sommer, and Tina louise (clip of scene with Tate is in the new film)

Easy Rider (1969) with Peter Fonda, Dennis Hopper, Jack Nicholson, Karen Black, and Toni Basil

Bob and Carol Ted and Alice (1969) with Natalie Wood, Elliot Gould, Dyan Cannon, and Robert Culp

Model Shop (1969) with Gary Lockwood and Anouk Aimee

Cactus Flower (1969) with Ingrid Bergman, Walter Matthau, Goldie Hawn, Rick Lenz, and Jack Weston

Getting Straight (1970) with Elliot Gould and Candice Bergen

There was a marquee with a movie starring George Peppard.  I think it was Pendulum which was released in 1969.  Now I want to see OUATIH again so I can answer all my own questions!

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On 7/29/2019 at 11:11 AM, Det Jim McLeod said:

Another thing I loved about this movie was the "double lead" characters in it. Both Dicaprio and Pitt have large amounts of screen time, separate and together. I was thinking, if nominated for Oscars would both be for the Best Actor or maybe one would be lead and the other supporting?

It made me think of other times this happened:

Burt Lancaster and Montgomery Clift in "From Here To Eternity"

Richard Burton and Peter O'Toole in "Becket"

Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman in "Midnight Cowboy"

Driving home from the movie, I had the same thought.  If one gets a Best Actor nod and the other a Supporting nod, one of them will be robbed.  Both deserve the lead Best Actor nomination.

Another example:  James Dean and Rock Hudson in "Giant."

Not to mention for Best Actress:  Bette Davis and Anne Baxter in "All About Eve," and Anne Bancroft and Shirley MacLaine in "The Turning Point."

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On 7/26/2019 at 6:22 PM, cigarjoe said:

Might as well start a formal separate thread for this.

Written & Directed by Quentin Tarantino. Cinematography by Robert Richardson. Starring....

Leonardo DiCaprio as Rick Dalton:
An actor who starred in the television Western series Bounty Law from 1958 to 1963, based on Wanted Dead or Alive (1958–1961). His attempt to transition to film failed and in 1969 he is struggling, doing guest roles on other people's programs while contemplating moving to Italy, which has become a hotbed for low-budget Westerns. Dalton's relationship with Cliff Booth is based on that of actor Burt Reynolds and his long time stunt double Hal Needham.

Brad Pitt as Cliff Booth:
A Vietnam War veteran and Rick's longtime stunt double and best friend. Tarantino and Pitt modeled Booth after Billy Jack, a character portrayed in four films by actor Tom Laughlin.

Margot Robbie as Sharon Tate:
A pregnant actress married to director Roman Polanski and next door neighbor of Dalton. Robbie did not consult with Polanski in preparation for the role, but read his 1985 autobiography Roman by Polanski.

Emile Hirsch as Jay Sebring:
A Hollywood hairstylist and friend and ex-boyfriend of Tate.

Margaret Qualley as Pussycat:
A member of the "Manson Family" who catches Booth's interest. Based loosely on Kathryn Lutesinger who had the nickname "Kitty".

Timothy Olyphant as James Stacy:
An actor who co-starred on the TV western Lancer.

Austin Butler as Charles "Tex" Watson:
A central member of the "Manson Family", alongside four other members.

Dakota Fanning as Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme:
A member of the infamous "Manson Family" who obtained her nickname while living on George Spahn's ranch.

Bruce Dern as George Spahn:
An 80-year-old nearly blind man who rented his Los Angeles ranch out to be used as a location for Westerns. Charles Manson convinced Spahn to allow him and his followers to live on the ranch. In exchange for rent, Manson coerced his female followers into having sexual relations with the ranch owner, and serving as his seeing-eye guides. Burt Reynolds was initially cast in the role, but died before his scenes could be filmed.

Al Pacino as Marvin Schwarzs:
A Hollywood producer and Dalton's agent.

Kurt Russell as Randy:
A stunt coordinator who also serves as the film's narrator.

Zoë Bell as Randy's wife, also a stunt coordinator.

Lorenza Izzo as Francesca Cappucci, an Italian film crew member and Dalton's eventual wife

Michael Madsen as the Sheriff on Bounty Law

Damian Lewis as Steve McQueen

Mike Moh as Bruce Lee

and many more...

Let the discussions begin.
 

Damon Herriman appeared oh so briefly as Charles Manson.  Recognized Margaret Qualley as Pussycat (Andie MacDowell's real life daughter) who also played Ann Reinking in Fosse/Verdon.

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On 7/26/2019 at 7:22 PM, cigarjoe said:

Margot Robbie as Sharon Tate:
A pregnant actress married to director Roman Polanski and next door neighbor of Dalton. Robbie did not consult with Polanski in preparation for the role, but read his 1985 autobiography Roman by Polanski.

Those actor/role descriptions like above were all just copied from some site I found. A friend suggest I add.

Sharon Tate's sister was a kind of consultant on the film and even lent Robbie some of the dead woman's jewelry to use.

 

Everybody feel free to make additions.

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4 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

Did anyone else notice how many times the 1957 Chevy Bel Air in turquoise with white top appeared in the film?  I counted at least 3 times.  I used to have one just like it. 

There was a marquee with a movie starring George Peppard.  I think it was Pendulum which was released in 1969.  Now I want to see OUATIH again so I can answer all my own questions!

It was Pendulum.

The movie's IMDb page lists a whole gaggle of films that are visible throughout the film.

There were clips from:

The Wrecking Crew (1968)

Teenage Monster (1958)

Death on the Run (1967)

 

A coming attractions preview of:

CC and Company (1970)

 

A radio ad for:

The Illustrated Man (1969)

 

Posters/Ads/Billboards for:

The Golden Stallion (1949)

Don't Make Waves (1967)

The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967)

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

the Boston Strangler (1968)

Oliver! (1968)

Ice Station Zebra (1968)

They Came to Rob Las Vegas (1968)

Joanna (1968)

The Killing of Sister George (1968)

Model Shop (1969)

Sweet Charity (1969)

McKenna's Gold (1969)

Hell's Angels  69 (1969)

Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970)

 

Marquees listing:

Pendulum (1969)

Romeo and Juliet (1968)

Turn Me On (1968 p0rn0)

Babette/Return of the Secret Society (1968 p0rn0)

Pretty Poison (1968)

Lady in Cement (1968)

The Mercenary (1968)

the Night They Raided Minsky's (1968)

The Sergeant (1968)

 

Verbal references to:

Valley of the Dolls (1967)

Rosemary's Baby (1968)

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15 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

A coming attractions preview of:

CC and Company (1970)

That was an awful biker film with NY Jet Joe Namath and gorgeous Ann Margret. Joe was one of the best quarterbacks to play the game but one of the worst actors ever in movies and TV.

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On 7/31/2019 at 11:07 AM, filmnoirguy said:

Did anyone else notice how many times the 1957 Chevy Bel Air in turquoise with white top appeared in the film?  I counted at least 3 times.  I used to have one just like it. 

Yep, I noticed the '57 Chevy too, fng.

Like I said earlier in this thing, there sure were a lot of legit possible additions to the "That's a Nice Car" thread to be seen in this flick.

(...btw...doncha wish you still had that baby o' yours...they're going for a pretty penny now days in good to excellent condition, as I'm sure you know...didn't see any '57 Chevys go for less than $30K at the Barrett-Jackson car auction last January in Scottsdale, and with many for WAY higher than that figure)

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https://movieweb.com/once-upon-a-time-in-hollywood-4-hour-cut-netflix/

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood 4-Hour Cut May Be Heading to Netflix

 

There's a decent chance we're going to see a much longer cut of Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. Recently, a rumor popped up, via entertainment reporter Kyle Buchanon, that stated the director was planning on releasing a longer cut for Netflix, much like he did with The Hateful Eight, which would be cut into episodes. Buchanon, taking to Twitter, had this to say.

"I keep hearing Tarantino told the Once Upon a Time in Hollywoodactors that he'll put their deleted scenes back when he recuts the film into episodes for Netflix, akin to what he recently did with Hateful Eight."
Were it only for that tweet, this would merely exist in the plausible rumor mill. Now, however, we have further evidence from one of the stars of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood that further confirms this rumor. Nicholas Hammond, who plays Sam Wanamaker in Quentin Tarantino's ode to 60s Hollywood, recently was interviewed and, lo and behold, he confirmed, to the best of his knowledge, such talks are taking place. Here's what Hammond had to say.
"There is talk about there being a 4-hour Netflix version, as well, because there were a lot of scenes he shot that couldn't make it into the film because there just simply wasn't room. The promise is that like his other film, 'The Hateful Eight,' they just done a 4-hour Netflix version. And I think they're talking about doing the same. There are some actors like Tim Roth, wonderful actors, who never even made it into the film. I mean, they're entire roles got cut...The Netflix version will be great too."

As certain folks may recall, earlier this year, an extended cut of The Hateful Eight appeared on Netflix that was much longer than the theatrical cut. It was four hours and was divided into four different episodes, effectively turning the movie into a miniseries. It was later revealed that Tarantino worked on the cut personally with editor Fred Raskin.

With that in mind, it's highly possible the filmmaker could do the same for Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. We already know plenty of footage made it on the cutting room floor. So much so that certain performances were removed entirely. Aside from Tim Roth, James Marsden had been cast as the late Burt Reynolds. However, Marsden's part was removed from the final cut. Should this Netflix cut come to pass, we may still see the footage, in context, and not just as a deleted scene on the Blu-ray/DVD release.

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, despite several controversies, is doing quite well. The movie set a personal best for Quentin Tarantino at the box office last weekend and critics, generally speaking, have responded very kindly, making it a likely awards season contender. Specifically, Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Margot Robbie could be up for Oscars for their performances. Feel free to check out the full interview with Nicholas Hammond from the Discussing Film YouTube channel below.

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On 8/2/2019 at 12:47 AM, Dargo said:

they're going for a pretty penny now days in good to excellent condition, as I'm sure you know...didn't see any '57 Chevys go for less than $30K at the Barrett-Jackson car auction last January in Scottsdale, and with many for WAY higher than that figure

Really? that's interesting. I bought one for $1500 a little over 20 years ago as a gift. Not working, but body was in great shape. The guy called the color Chevy "Larkspur Blue". I thought it was the most common car in the most common color which is why it was so cheap.

The person I gave it to was a fellow restorer so it was like an "investment" gift.

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I tried to only vaguely allude to plot elements, but if you don't want even vague allusions of spoilers, don't read!

I'd avoided the threads discussing this movie until I saw it for fear people might be discussing the ending. Dargo, did your wife make it through the movie okay? Because it took a while, but we did finally get to the stereotypical Tarantino extreme violence. The final act shouldn't come as a total surprise for anyone who's seen the way Tarantino has played with reality before in Ingolorous Basterds and Django Unchained, but you know, given the subject matter, I certainly went in assuming it was all heading in one preordained direction, and Tarantino knew what those audience expectations were and completely subverted them! And so, while there is extreme violence, it is to some extent cathartic and righteous, given the way we were assuming it was all going to turn out. I'm reading that audiences are typically laughing during this scene, which happened at my screening also.

Just so we don't feel too cozy about these characters, Tarantino also surprises us with a very dark twist about the past of Brad Pitt's character I certainly wasn't expecting!

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