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Blame Star Wars (1977)?


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The science fiction/fantasy/super hero universe the film industry often inhabits today I'm sure would be traced back by many to this seminal movie.  The mania it produced was like no other, to which, I'm forced to admit, I was subject.  I knew people who went to see it ten, fifteen times--even more.  I saw it I think some four times.  The magic of computer-controlled cameras on a scale unknown married to a romance-infused storyline proved irresistible.  It was certainly eye-splitting, not the least of which for that immobilizing opening shot of the galactic battleship endlessly growing.  Added to that the years of inspired build-up as the movie was being made, with tantalizing treats released bit by bit (even a pic of storm troopers!), and you can imagine the salivating public ready to devour it.  But I think while the special effects of the movie were influential, more played into it.  The culture was primed for the arrival of the movie.

There was the growing area of adventure fantasy and sword and sorcery in fiction.  Lots would point to the Lord of the Rings, or the Conan the Barbarian stories as the source for that.  But that had always had a low-grade, if enthusiastic, audience.  What I remember as the break-out was a series by Anne McCaffery called The Dragon Riders of Pern.  It joined two rich veins in culture, extra-terriestrial human activity and dragons.

Also, the first role playing game, Dungeons and Dragons, had been making a big splash.  It allowed people to adventure in exotic worlds of strange creatures with extraordinary powers, fulfilling their fantasies of power and giving them freedom from the constraints of ordinary life.

As for that stunning opening:

Think George Lucas knew this?  Yes, he did.

 

Star Wars (1977) tonight, 7pm Pacific time.

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I have it on both VHS and disc, so I might not bother tuning in tonight.  But its still early today....  ;)

And in spite of what my daughter insists, I think the FX hold up well enough after these lo, 42 years.  What we( meaning me and a few buddies) initially liked about the movie was that is was MORE than just a SCI-FI flick.  There were elements of the WESTERNS we grew up watching, and similar banter to that heard in those WWII flicks we saw on TV since we were kids. And all wrapped around an Errol Flynn swashbuckler!  

I will never NOT like watching this movie.

Sepiatone

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I remember being in the check-out line at a supermarket with my mom not long before the film's release and seeing a magazine cover of C-3PO in the Tunisian desert. I couldn't even wrap my head around what this creature was, exactly, it was so different and more exotic than any film still I'd ever seen before, and I knew I had to see this movie.

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I purchased it when it came out on (was a long awaited event then) on the CED videodisc.  After the player went to the landfill, got the DVD Trilogy box set.  Kept the CED and a couple others for memories.

Episode IV, 42 years old and not rebooted - I'm stunned. ;)

star-wars-trilogy-dvd-box-set.jpg?qualit

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8 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

I remember being in the check-out line at a supermarket with my mom not long before the film's release and seeing a magazine cover of C-3PO in the Tunisian desert. I couldn't even wrap my head around what this creature was, exactly, it was so different and more exotic than any film still I'd ever seen before, and I knew I had to see this movie.

Before the film's release I got the LP soundtrack which included a poster.  Count the mistakes! :blink::lol:

FJLjlwMItvKWTOefkSDYZnjodUSITZQN8fz35PQ1

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does tonite's version of star wars have that stupid cgi smoke ring when the death star explodes?

and screw that 'a new hope' HS too.

not a bad lineup as we get to hear the real kirk belch out "KHHAAAANNNNN!" as only shatner can.

Image result for shatner KHAN!

Image result for shatner KHAN!

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4 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

does tonite's version of star wars have that stupid cgi smoke ring when the death star explodes?

and screw that 'a new hope' HS too.

It's most likely going to be the remastered version that appears on other TV channels from time to time.

maxresdefault-26.jpg

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48 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

And in spite of what my daughter insists, I think the FX hold up well enough after these lo, 42 years.  What we( meaning me and a few buddies) initially liked about the movie was that is was MORE than just a SCI-FI flick.  There were elements of the WESTERNS we grew up watching, and similar banter to that heard in those WWII flicks we saw on TV since we were kids. And all wrapped around an Errol Flynn swashbuckler!  

I will never NOT like watching this movie.

Sepiatone

There are also many visual and thematic references to Kurosawa's samurai films.

Peasants.jpg

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37 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

does tonite's version of star wars have that stupid cgi smoke ring when the death star explodes?

and screw that 'a new hope' HS too.

not a bad lineup as we get to hear the real kirk belch out "KHHAAAANNNNN!" as only shatner can.

 

 

You should know George Lucas had budget, time and technical constraints.  He wanted to convey his original concept but couldn't.  Try to do Episode I in 1977!

Star Wars barely got to the silver screen, other studios turned it down with later regrets.

 

Stargate Atlantis with the better improved "smoke ring". :D

 

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8 minutes ago, hamradio said:

You should know George Lucas had budget, time and technical constraints.  He wanted to convey his original concept but couldn't.  Try to do Episode I in 1977!

Star Wars barely got to the silver screen, other studios turned it down with later regrets

You of course meant "Episode IV" here, ham. ;)

Well, at least known as such now days anyway, as you know.

(...still good point here though)

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George Lucas was smart and insightful placing the plot in a galaxy far far away.

Poor Milky Way, bet those in the Star Wars galaxy is looking back at us and saying..Those poor people on that planet, must be very lonely. 

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1 hour ago, hamradio said:

I purchased it when it came out on (was a long awaited event then) on the CED videodisc.  After the player went to the landfill, got the DVD Trilogy box set.  Kept the CED and a couple others for memories.

Episode IV, 42 years old and not rebooted - I'm stunned. ;)

star-wars-trilogy-dvd-box-set.jpg?qualit

I had found a certain disc having what I had believed to had been the original version of the movie in a package with an image similar to this one:

911uAMIhbqL._SL1500_.jpg
 

1 hour ago, The Keeper said:

I will not be watching. There is a six hour horror-comedy, split over two nights, on CNN.

What "horror-comedy"?

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5 hours ago, slaytonf said:

...The magic of computer-controlled cameras on a scale unknown married to a romance-infused storyline proved irresistible.  It was certainly eye-splitting, not the least of which for that immobilizing opening shot of the galactic battleship endlessly growing...  

 

You're right to use the idea of marriage, because the movie finally brought together elements we always felt the art of filmmaking had promised us but so far hadn't totally delivered on. That opening shot is a great example. As well as being eye-splitting, it was ear-splitting: I remember the rumbling at the "back" of the theater, then the feeling as the sound moved ominously overhead, then the first glimpse of the battleship moving onto the screen as the sound followed it ahead...and followed and followed as the entire ship came into view. The sound editing as well as the special effects set a very high standard and together they created an experience moviegoers had been waiting for.

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

You of course meant "Episode IV" here, ham. ;)

Well, at least known as such now days anyway, as you know.

(...still good point here though)

I think he was referring to Episode I - The Phantom Menace from 1999. He was saying that it would have been impossible to make it in '77.

 

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2 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

It's most likely going to be the remastered version that appears on other TV channels from time to time.

Rumor has it that George Lucas, wonder of wonders, did NOT burn all the 1977 prints after all, as fans for years suspected he had (every time core fans would go on Change.org and demand "Lucas release the hidden UOT!"), and that a rare restored print screened last month at a film-event showing double feature with (ick) "Rogue One".

I'll believe it, though, when I see it verified by additional sources.  Apples and bananas, and all that.

1 hour ago, Mario500 said:

I had found a certain disc having what I had believed to had been the original version of the movie in a package with an image similar to this one:

911uAMIhbqL._SL1500_.jpg\

Yes, the Limited Edition DVD's of the original trilogy--in response to said demands--included a second DVD with upscaled versions of the original 80's laserdisc sources, before all the changes made to the '97 Special Editions.  Including the non-Episode "Star Wars" where Han shot first.

When fans asked "C'mon, quit cheating, couldn't you do a really nice remastered version from the original film sources?", Lucas remained strangely silent, and later went on his big persecuted-director tantrum that "They're MY films, and I have the right to cut them as I see them"--Complaining that the fandom had become too demanding to deal with, and that they, quote, "kept asking for something he couldn't give them anymore".

....THAT was a curious choice of words.  😔

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5 hours ago, hamradio said:

Episode IV, 42 years old and not rebooted - I'm stunned. ;)

Nope...Just "Legacy-quel"'ed.    😓

rey-and-han-1.jpg

(Ie. the new Warner/Disney word for new revival-franchise movies where the old 70's/80's actors show up just long enough to break in the new trainees, and then Epically Die, so they can retire from any future "reboots".  With Blade Runner: 2049, and the new Indiana Jones movie coming up, Harrison Ford's become an old hand at these.)

5 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

There are also many visual and thematic references to Kurosawa's samurai films.

And the obvious one in particular:

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10 hours ago, DougieB said:

You're right to use the idea of marriage, because the movie finally brought together elements we always felt the art of filmmaking had promised us but so far hadn't totally delivered on. That opening shot is a great example. As well as being eye-splitting, it was ear-splitting: I remember the rumbling at the "back" of the theater, then the feeling as the sound moved ominously overhead, then the first glimpse of the battleship moving onto the screen as the sound followed it ahead...and followed and followed as the entire ship came into view. The sound editing as well as the special effects set a very high standard and together they created an experience moviegoers had been waiting for.

Ships are class like our navy...  Frigates, destroyer, and dreadnought. 

 

(The word dreadnought is also used to describe some of our historic battleships)

 

Technically its a Imperial I-class Star Destroyer.

latest?cb=20160408013958

 

Venator Class Star Destroyer from the Republic era (Episode III)

212bff04ee13e79304a8aceb67f85099

 

 

Nebulon-B escort frigate

latest?cb=20061215024715

 

Mandator IV-class Siege Dreadnought (First Order)

latest?cb=20181015041722

 

 

Edited by hamradio
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11 hours ago, Mario500 said:

I had found a certain disc having what I had believed to had been the original version of the movie in a package with an image similar to this one:

911uAMIhbqL._SL1500_.jpg
 

What "horror-comedy"?

democrat debate on cnn.

:lol:

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Please advise on whether George Lucas, TCM, or I am to blame here.  One of the most memorable lines for me in the 1977 original Star Wars film and the novelization is Princess Leia's, "Leave him alone.  Can't you see what the old man meant to him?" during the escape from the Death Star.  I was listening for it in the scene where she placed the blanket around Luke's shoulders, but I would swear that the TCM version went straight from Han Solo saying, "Come with me, kid, we're not out of this yet," to Luke shaking off the blanket to follow Han without Leia saying anything.  Was this line only in the novelization, and I merely imagined it to be in the movie?  Or was it in the original movie, and if so why no mention of such a significant cut on any of the fan sites listing changes?  Was it somehow missing from the TCM version only but appears on the discs (I looked into getting discs several years ago, but everything I saw was Blu-Ray only and I wasn't buying a new player just for that), or, most sinister and insidious, was the line actually spoken in the TCM version and I briefly entered an alternate timeline in which that line doesn't exist?  I can't find this scene on YouTube so help me, internet.  You're my only hope!  Thanks and May the Force Be With You.

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It's surprising how complete my memory of the movie was, not having seen it since it was in theaters way then.  There were only a few scenes, shots even, that I did not recall.  The worst I misremembered was Luke's womp rat reference.  I thought it was made in the bar scene, and not the final battle briefing.  Here's a pic, btw:500?cb=20160403205810

Ugly cusses.

 

It's just as fun to watch.  Some of the effects are a little dated, but I don't think it worthwhile to go a lot into that, considering how poor the print was.  Here is a true case also of the wrong aspect ratio.  You can even see it switch back and forth from true widescreen to pseudo widescreen (i.e., TV ratio).  Too bad, as I'm sure that takes a lot away from the look of the movie.  I sensed something didn't feel right while I was watching (no, not a disturbance in the force).  I even switched through the different aspect ratio options on my superdelux LG HDTV  (ha!).  Nope, 16:9 all the way, so I guess this is the modern pan and scan.   Perhaps it was Fox, or Lucas, or Disney--who owns it now?--trying to encourage people to buy a Blu ray disc to get the real ratio.

The CGI interpolations people above were complaining about were annoying, but fortunately weren't many, and just at the beginning of the movie.  Perhaps it was George Lucas' OCD that compelled him to fiddle with the Tatooine scenes because the effect of budget limitations always rankled him.  To me they aren't an outrage, but just stoopid, and they don't fit the look of the movie.  You can go on and on all you want about who has creative 'ownership' of anything, the artist or the audience, but I look at it this way.  Just because a filmmaker is brilliant (and George Lucas can be brilliant), or a genius (which he is not), that doesn't mean everything they do, or every idea they have is brilliant or a work of genius.  

 

 

 

 

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