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MusicalsGalore

Classic Films that have not aged well?

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I love old movies. Some of them have aged worse than others. Here are some of the movies I think haven't aged well :

 

42nd Street - Many of the early Hollywood musicals feel extremely dated and boring. 

 

Rebel Without a Cause - Ain't as good as I remember it being. Dean's acting was a little over the top,  especially with the line "YOUR'E TEARING ME APART!"

 

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers- I believe this is self-explanatory 

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I actually like to see how norms and mores have changed through the years. I don't expect a 1930 film to have 2019 sensibilities. Times change, customs and style are cyclical. So whatever hasn't aged today, might be popular again in ten years. So who knows ?

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When I saw most of my classic film repertoire, these films were already 30 to 40 years old. So you really have to go with the time And generally judge it within a period time frame. However if it has any Artistic integrity, you should be able to find something universal to humans that we can all relate to anyway-- no matter what your age, background or nationality Etc is.

But I have to admit as much as I love musicals and technically good dancing:

"Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" is a film that I have never liked

From the first time that I saw or heard about it in the 60s.

And it's not just the messed up subject matter. The soundstage  staging--I should say the set--looks so phony to me even for the time that they did it. And these guys are such great dancers that you wouldn't expect them to be great actors too.

But of course I'm glad those dancers got a chance to show their stuff. And Michael Kidd was a great movie choreographer.

 

On 8/7/2019 at 8:45 AM, MusicalsGalore said:

I love old movies. Some of them have aged worse than others. Here are some of the movies I think haven't aged well :

 

42nd Street - Many of the early Hollywood musicals feel extremely dated and boring. 

 

Rebel Without a Cause - Ain't as good as I remember it being. Dean's acting was a little over the top,  especially with the line "YOUR'E TEARING ME APART!"

 

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers- I believe this is self-explanatory 

 

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On 8/7/2019 at 8:45 AM, MusicalsGalore said:

I love old movies. Some of them have aged worse than others. Here are some of the movies I think haven't aged well :

 

42nd Street - Many of the early Hollywood musicals feel extremely dated and boring. 

 

Rebel Without a Cause - Ain't as good as I remember it being. Dean's acting was a little over the top,  especially with the line "YOUR'E TEARING ME APART!"

 

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers- I believe this is self-explanatory 

Now I'd be curious to know which ones you think have not aged so much?

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The "generation gap" movies of the 1960s where you have old stars trying to act hip with the younger set -- think things like Bob Hope in I'll Take Sweden or Deborah Kerr in Marriage on the Rocks haven't held up well at all.

On the other hand, Yours, Mine, and Ours is pretty darn square and still pretty darn good.

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20 minutes ago, Fedya said:

The "generation gap" movies of the 1960s where you have old stars trying to act hip with the younger set -- think things like Bob Hope in I'll Take Sweden or Deborah Kerr in Marriage on the Rocks haven't held up well at all.

On the other hand, Yours, Mine, and Ours is pretty darn square and still pretty darn good.

But those movies seemed out of touch when they debuted

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On 8/7/2019 at 9:45 AM, MusicalsGalore said:

I love old movies. Some of them have aged worse than others. Here are some of the movies I think haven't aged well :

42nd Street - Many of the early Hollywood musicals feel extremely dated and boring. 

But not the dark, filthy precode Busby Berkeley ones coming out of "street-gritty" Warner!

We're enjoying Golddiggers of 1933 and Footlight Parade a LOT more than we were able to back in the old-Hollywood-dismissive 70's!  B)

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On 8/7/2019 at 9:45 AM, MusicalsGalore said:

Rebel Without a Cause - Ain't as good as I remember it being. Dean's acting was a little over the top,  especially with the line "YOUR'E TEARING ME APART!"

I never liked it all that much anyway.

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16 hours ago, MusicalsGalore said:

I agree with Yours , Mine , and ours still being good. I also like "With Six you get Eggroll"

I like both Yours, Mine and Ours and With Six You Get Eggroll.  The former film is superior, but 'Eggroll' has its moments.  I especially liked the pairing of Brian Keith and Doris Day.

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16 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I never liked it all that much anyway.

I don't know what it is about Rebel Without a Cause.  I really enjoy it.  Even if James Dean is over the top, I really like the film.  It may be one of those movies for me that has an intangible quality about it that I can't articulate why I like it. 

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I always try to look at many movies in the context of when it was filmed.  Ya gotta remember....

When most of the movies shown on TCM were made, there WERE no considerations for TV syndication, worries about relating to audiences 40 years in the future, etc.  They were intended to show one or two times, and put away and forgotten.  I'm sure if someone knew what the future would hold they would have preserved those movies LOTS better than they did.  NObody in 1939 working on  GONE WITH THE WIND mentioned to anybody in charge;

"Y'know, probably by 2019 some millennials will question the racial implications in the script, or it's historical accuracy or whether or not it RELATES to anything or anybody at that time...."    ;) 

Like REBEL, for instance... Hollywood trying to cash in on the "juvenile delinquent" problem but still too, try to tell a story with some kind of hopeful future.  But, sadly not for "Plato" or "Buzz".  Perhaps a cautionary tale of sorts? 

Sepiatone

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19 hours ago, EricJ said:

But not the dark, filthy precode Busby Berkeley ones coming out of "street-gritty" Warner!

We're enjoying Golddiggers of 1933 and Footlight Parade a LOT more than we were able to back in the old-Hollywood-dismissive 70's!  B)

In the old so-called Hollywood dismissive 70s, young people who were involved with LSD often favored Busby Berkeley production numbers for his panoramic patterns. Reportedly, "The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat"with Carmen Miranda was a favorite. LOL

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A lot of arty films from various eras have not aged well. We were discussing Accident on one of the other threads, and there seemed to be a consensus that despite the photography and some of the performances (Stanley Baker, Dirk Bogarde, Vivien Merchant), the film has not aged well. Quite a number of posters here would say the same of Blow-Up. The split-screen photography of the late 60s/early 70s usually causes yawns or worse today. The rapid cuts that made Richard Lester seem so with-it in the 60s make his films seem so out of it now, unless they star the Beatles. The quick cuts in Tom Jones are now the least successful aspect of the film.

The politically aware films of the late 60s/early 70s have not held up well. Medium Cool, for instance, recently shown on TCM, is earnest, not bad, not too interesting, either. When Peter Fonda, speaking of the hippie commune in Easy Rider, solemnly intones, "They're going to make it," a modern audience is likely to laugh out loud. I guess you had to be there. As some of us were.

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5 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

In the old so-called Hollywood dismissive 70s, young people who were involved with LSD often favored Busby Berkeley production numbers for his panoramic patterns. Reportedly, "The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat"with Carmen Miranda was a favorite. LOL

Yes, but by the "Old-Hollywood-dismissive 70's", I mean back in the days when we thought Esther Williams' "Smoke" number from Million Dollar Mermaid was literally every musical ever made.  By Busby Berkeley, of course.  (Look up any Hollywood parody of 30's musicals made between 1969 and 1981, and see how many of them DON'T use the panning shot of happy faces diving camera-right into a swimming pool--"Y-M-C-A...")

It's easy to dismiss anything (Lewis Carroll, Monty Python) as "on drugs, huhuh" if you don't take the trouble to understand it, but fact is, Carmen Miranda's tutti-frutti hat at Fox was the first time Berkeley was ever allowed to cut loose with his crazy abstract ideas since the Warner days, after MGM had clamped down on his creativity.  Even though Golddiggers of 1936 was Berkeley's first "cleaned-up" post-code Warner musical, I remember watching "Lullaby of Broadway" with a film class, and the end of the number brought first a laugh, and then a "Whoa...What? 😮 ".

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23 hours ago, Fedya said:

The "generation gap" movies of the 1960s where you have old stars trying to act hip with the younger set -- think things like Bob Hope in I'll Take Sweden or Deborah Kerr in Marriage on the Rocks haven't held up well at all.

On the other hand, Yours, Mine, and Ours is pretty darn square and still pretty darn good.

One word applies here: SKIDOO.

21936104310_a81a8a9b9a_b.jpg

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

Yes, but by the "Old-Hollywood-dismissive 70's", I mean back in the days when we thought Esther Williams' "Smoke" number from Million Dollar Mermaid was literally every musical ever made.  By Busby Berkeley, of course.  (Look up any Hollywood parody of 30's musicals made between 1969 and 1981, and see how many of them DON'T use the panning shot of happy faces diving camera-right into a swimming pool--"Y-M-C-A...")

It's easy to dismiss anything (Lewis Carroll, Monty Python) as "on drugs, huhuh" if you don't take the trouble to understand it, but fact is, Carmen Miranda's tutti-frutti hat at Fox was the first time Berkeley was ever allowed to cut loose with his crazy abstract ideas since the Warner days, after MGM had clamped down on his creativity.  Even though Golddiggers of 1936 was Berkeley's first "cleaned-up" post-code Warner musical, I remember watching "Lullaby of Broadway" with a film class, and the end of the number brought first a laugh, and then a "Whoa...What? 😮 ".

You can speak for yourself --where I was in the 70s people were into Revival theaters of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, MGM musicals and Busby Berkeley . And on-campus we were looking at these movies whether we were in film class or not.

But I'm talking about my experiences in the greater Kansas City area, in Chicago and in Paris in the 70s.

And "That's Entertainment" came out in the mid-70s and just about everyone was aware of what the MGM musicals were and how diverse they were. It was such a tremendous hit that they made a sequel starring Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly a few years later.

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20 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

One word applies here: SKIDOO.

21936104310_a81a8a9b9a_b.jpg

Yeah, but Skidoo goes so spectacularly wrong that it's great.

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1 hour ago, filmnoirguy said:

I watched 1954's The Caine Mutiny once again last night on TCM, and enjoyed it more than any current movie I've seen in a long time.

Now there's one movie that definitely has not aged at ALL--

As those of us know who've ever had to explain to the young kids why Trump's latest unhinged tweet-storms keep getting jokes about "Strawberries" and "Eh, go click yer lil' ball-bearings".  😄

 

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