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Best of Columbia Noir at SF's Roxie in September!


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From the Roxie Theater's website:

 

TWENTY NOIR GEMS FROM THE VAULTS OF COLUMBIA PICTURES!

 

FILM NOIR returns to San Francisco?s Roxie Theater with a vengeance! This past May, audiences were treated to two full weeks of rare B noirs as part of the ?I Wake Up Dreaming? festival which only seemed to remind everyone that The Roxie is THE place to be for classic, high quality FILM NOIR.

 

Now, in answer to the huge demand from noir enthusiasts all over the Bay Area, Elliot Lavine has programmed a stupendous ten day fest of noir classics and curios from the famed vaults of Columbia Pictures. A total of twenty great films?all presented in beautiful 35mm studio vault prints---and none currently available on DVD.

 

From Friday, Sept. 11 through Tuesday, Sept. 22, audiences will thrill to the works of such esteemed directors as Nicholas Ray (KNOCK ON ANY DOOR), Jacques Tourneur (NIGHTFALL), Don Siegel (THE LINE UP), Joseph H. Lewis (MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS and SO DARK THE NIGHT), Samuel Fuller (THE CRIMSON KIMONO), Robert Rossen (JOHNNY O?CLOCK), Irving Lerner (MURDER BY CONTRACT and CITY OF FEAR) and many more!

 

Many of Columbia?s higher profile noirs have sadly slipped through the cracks due to scant or non-existent home video or DVD versions. Major directors like Fuller, Ray and Siegel are woefully under-represented in this way and odd-ball gems like Richard Quine?s steamy PUSHOVER (1954) with Fred MacMurray and Kim Novak---Paul Wendkos? THE BURGLAR (1957), the remarkably strange and dark film from the novel by David Goodis starring Dan Duryea and Jayne Mansfield---an early film from William Castle, THE WHISTLER (1944)---and Will Jason?s stylish and disturbing horror-noir hybrid SOUL OF A MONSTER (1944) are rarely shown anywhere. This is the perfect end-of-summer tonic for noir addicts who are doomed to another long, dark winter.

 

Schedule

Friday, Sept 11:

JOHNNY O?CLOCK (1947)

BLIND SPOT (1947)

 

Saturday, Sept 12:

KNOCK ON ANY DOOR (1949)

CONVICTED (1950)

 

Sunday, Sept13:

PUSHOVER (1954)

DRIVE A CROOKED ROAD (1954)

 

Monday, Sept 14:

THE WHISTLER (1944)

THE SOUL OF A MONSTER (1944)

 

Tuesday, Sept 15:

SO DARK THE NIGHT (1946)

MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS (1945)

 

Wednesday, Sept 16:

No Noir Program tonight

 

Thursday, Sept 17:

THE LINE UP (1958)

THE SNIPER (1952)

 

Friday, Sept 18:

BETWEEN MIDNIGHT AND DAWN (1950)

THE KILLER THAT STALKED NEW YORK (1950)

 

Saturday, Sept 19:

THE CRIMSON KIMONO (1959)

SCREAMING MIMI (1958)

 

Sunday & Monday, Sept 20 & 21:

THE BURGLAR (1957)

NIGHTFALL (1957)

 

Tuesday, Sept 22:

MURDER BY CONTRACT (1958)

CITY OF FEAR (1959)

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I would really love to see The Lineup on the big screen out there. Great Don Siegel action with Eli Wallach doing a Richard Widmark/ Tommy Udo impersonation. And all shot in San Francisco with lots of great location filming. I've never been to San Fran, hope to someday. The Lineup should be aired more often, I bet many have never seen it, or even heard of it.

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The Roxie website now lists a new schedule, starting on Sept. 17. The schedule changes may be in response to the Brit Noir series at the Castro, also in September.

 

*_Schedule_*

Thursday, September 17:

JOHNNY O?CLOCK (1947)

BLIND SPOT (1947)

 

Friday, Sept, 18:

THE WHISTLER (1944)

THE SOUL OF A MONSTER (1944)

 

Saturday, Sept 19:

KNOCK ON ANY DOOR (1949)

CONVICTED (1950)

 

Sunday, Sept. 20:

PUSHOVER (1954)

DRIVE A CROOKED ROAD (1954)

 

Monday, Sept 21:

SO DARK THE NIGHT (1946)

MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS (1945)

 

Tuesday, Sept 22:

HUMAN DESIRE (1954)

FRAMED 1947

 

Thursday, Sept 24:

THE LINE UP (1958)

THE SNIPER (1952)

 

Friday, Sept 25:

BETWEEN MIDNIGHT AND DAWN (1950)

THE KILLER THAT STALKED NEW YORK (1950)

 

Saturday, Sept 26:

THE CRIMSON KIMONO (1959)

SCREAMING MIMI (1958)

 

Sunday & Monday, Sept 27 & 28:

THE BURGLAR (1957)

NIGHTFALL (1957)

 

Tuesday & Wednesday, Sept 29 & 30:

MURDER BY CONTRACT (1958)

CITY OF FEAR (1959)

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I?m pleased and proud to announce that the *Roxie Theater in San Francisco* has invited me back to curate another program of great noir films, commencing on *Thursday, September 17 and running through Wednesday, September 30*. This time around we?ll be presenting a whopping twenty-two films from the fabled vaults of *Columbia Pictures*! Although it has been reported that Sony has plans for releasing a handful of these titles on DVD later in the year, none are currently available in that format. I sincerely hope that noir enthusiasts from all over, not just the Bay Area, will find their way to the Roxie next month for this incredibly exciting series!

 

*THE BEST OF COLUMBIA NOIR :*

*TWENTY-TWO GEMS FROM THE VAULTS OF COLUMBIA PICTURES!*

*ALL SHOWN IN BEAUTIFUL, NEWLY RESTORD 35MM STUDIO ARCHIVE PRINTS!*

*Thursday, September 17 - Wednesday, September 30*

 

*THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17:*

JOHNNY O?CLOCK (1947)

BLIND SPOT (1947)

 

*FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18:*

THE WHISTLER (1944)

THE SOUL OF A MONSTER (1944)

 

*SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19:*

KNOCK ON ANY DOOR (1949)

CONVICTED (1950)

 

*SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20:*

PUSHOVER (1954)

DRIVE A CROOKED ROAD (1954)

 

*MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21:*

SO DARK THE NIGHT (1946)

MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS (1945)

 

*TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22:*

HUMAN DESIRE (1954)

FRAMED (1947)

 

*WED SEPT 23: NO SHOW TONIGHT!*

 

*THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24:*

THE LINE UP (1958)

THE SNIPER (1952)

 

*FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25:*

BETWEEN MIDNIGHT AND DAWN (1950)

THE KILLER THAT STALKED NEW YORK (1950)

 

*SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26:*

THE CRIMSON KIMONO (1959)

SCREAMING MIMI (1958)

 

*SUNDAY & MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 & 28:*

THE BURGLAR (1957)

NIGHTFALL (1957)

 

*TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 & 30:*

MURDER BY CONTRACT (1958)

CITY OF FEAR (1959)

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Dewey,

I'm glad to see the Roxie theater was able to reschedule the series to avoid a conflict with the Brit Noir series at the Castro Theater. That way, all noir fans win, and September looks very, very exciting for Bay Area noir fans!! :D

 

For those interested in the Brit Noir series, scheduled for NYC and SF, more info in this thread:

http://forums.tcm.com/jive/tcm/thread.jspa?threadID=145973&tstart=0

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Arkadin said: *Soul of a Monster hits the big screen! I can't wait to hear what everyone thinks about that one.*

 

*SOUL OF A MONSTER* represents one of the more intriguing hybrids of the noir style---a blend of pulp mysticism and B noir mystery. I think that fans of the style will find this film to be a revelation and hopefully open the door for more widespread acceptance. It's quite remarkable on a variety of levels.

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> {quote:title=Dewey1960 wrote:}{quote}

> *SOUL OF A MONSTER* represents one of the more intriguing hybrids of the noir style---a blend of pulp mysticism and B noir mystery. I think that fans of the style will find this film to be a revelation and hopefully open the door for more widespread acceptance. It's quite remarkable on a variety of levels.

 

Sounds very intriguing. I certainly look forward to watching it!

 

I take it you don't know how much the series pass is going to be. The information is not on the Roxie website, as far as I can see. But that's OK - I'll just call the Roxie.

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Well, when it comes to revival showings of classic movies and film festivals, NYC, LA and SF Bay seem to be among the best places for film buffs to live in.

 

If you like noir, you may want to check my thread on Brit Noir - that series plays in NYC, so it's not too far from where you are (if there was something you wanted to see very badly).

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Hi finance! You might find it interesting to know that one of the films in the Roxie's upcoming film noir extravaganza, *THE BURGLAR*, was written by one of Philadelphia's most notable writers--David Goodis. Much of the picture was filmed right there in Philly!

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Dewey,

 

Congratulations! It looks like a wonderfully diverse lineup. I'm new to noir, but I just wanted to tell you how happy I am that you were able to present this group of films. Which ones are you most looking forward to presenting?

 

The one I am most interested in is *My Name is Julia Ross.*

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Hi JF - Thanks for your very kind words about my noir show at the Roxie! I think it's going to be enormously exciting with a number of films that have been quite elusive. As for the films I'm personally most thrilled about presenting are: *JOHNNY O'CLOCK*, terrific debut feature from Robert Rossen, *THE WHISTLER*, totally eerie B noir directed by William Castle, *SOUL OF A MONSTER*, really interesting supernatural noir with the ominous George MacReady, both Joseph H. Lewis noirs, *MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS* and *SO DARK THE NIGHT*, Fritz Lang's evocative sizzler *HUMAN DESIRE*, the pair of noirs adapted from David Goodis' novels, *THE BURGLAR* and *NIGHTFALL*, Fuller's *CRIMSON KIMONO* and both the Irving Lerner / Vince Edwards films *MURDER BY CONTRACT* and *CITY OF FEAR*. Wow.

Here's the schedule:

http://www.roxie.com/events/details.cfm?eventid=80E856EB%2DACC8%2DFC5D%2DA2373DFE6FB28ADB

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  • 2 weeks later...

From Friday's SF Chronicle:

 

*Bay Area hosting 3 film noir series*

 

Walter Addiego, Chronicle Staff Writer

 

Friday, August 28, 2009

 

Once the setting for many noir films, San Francisco is now heaven on earth for fans of the genre. In September, no fewer than three notable noir series will play at Bay Area venues.

 

The Roxie continues its long love affair with these downbeat crime films by presenting "The Best of Columbia Noir," a series curated by veteran programmer Elliot Lavine. None of the 22 films, to be shown in newly restored 35mm prints, is available on DVD. The series runs Sept. 17 through 30. (Details at Roxie.com.)

 

What is film noir? In Lavine's opinion, it's "a unique American monochromatic film style popular from roughly 1940 through the end of the 1950s, which capitalized on anxieties stemming from World War II, the atomic age and the madness of the Communist witch hunt."

 

Noir continues to draw viewers, Lavine says, because the films are "surprisingly modern in their look and their attitude. We live in very precarious times."

 

And what better setting than the Roxie? "Noir is all about mood and texture," Lavine says, "and the Roxie boasts an enormous amount of both."

 

Lavine's favorites in the series are: "Johnny O'Clock" ("a seriously beautiful example of the raw and erotic power of noir"); "The Burglar" ("spectacular in its depiction of the world-weariness of criminal lowlifes"); "Murder by Contract" ("an astonishing example of minimalism merging with pulp nastiness to create a minor masterpiece").

 

The Castro, home of the annual Noir City festival, is another great place to indulge your noir sweet tooth, and from Sept. 11 to 16 the theater will offer a series of British noir. The films are from Rialto Pictures, which specializes in reissues.

 

Among the series' main attractions are a restored 35mm print of John Boulton's "Brighton Rock," based on the Graham Greene novel and starring Richard Attenborough; Michael Powell's celebrated "Peeping Tom"; and Carol Reed's "The Third Man," starring Joseph Cotten and Orson Welles. (Details at Castrotheatre.com.)

 

Berkeley's Pacific Film Archive also celebrates British noir with "Tea and Larceny: Classic British Crime Films," running Wednesday though Oct. 31. (Details at BAMPFA.berkeley.edu.)

 

Program curator Steve Seid, in his notes for the series, writes that British directors had their own take on noir: "Though a few films (in the series), like 'Obsession' and 'Night and the City,' have ties to the tough mugs of American movies, most give up the goods as only the Brits could do it - it's all menace hiding behind the manners."

 

Two likely highlights: "No Orchids for Miss Blandish," adapted from a James Hadley Chase novel and thoroughly denounced ("brutality, perversion, sex and sadism") on its release in 1948; and a modern noir, Peter Medak's "The Krays," a 1990 look at the twin brothers who became kings of the London underworld.

 

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/08/28/MV7H19E5UG.DTL

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