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Who is the Best Director of All-Time?


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14 hours ago, The Keeper/The Sandman said:

I am shocked at your very recent comments to spence. Yes, you have been kind before, but I can understand spence seeing your last comments as negative. I sure do.

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On 9/15/2019 at 2:23 PM, LawrenceA said:

If you're asking who is "the greatest director", try picking one instead of three.

Why is your second sentence in parentheses?

And what's with the asterisks everywhere?

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20 hours ago, JakeHolman said:

John Ford ...

honorable mentions ...

george stevens ... delmer daves ... john sturges ... budd boetticher ... anthony mann ... cecil b. demille ... william wellman ... king vidor ...  sergio leone ...

Robert Aldrich

and Sergio Leone.

:)

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John Ford ... The Searchers ...

George Stevens ... Shane ...

Delmer Daves ... The Hanging Tree ...

John Sturges ... The Magnificent Seven ...

Budd Boetticher ... The Tall T ...

Anthony Mann ... El Cid ...

Cecil B DeMille ... The Ten Commandments ...

William Wellman ... Yellow Sky ...

King Vidor ... The Fountainhead ...

Sergio Leone ... The Good, The Bad and The Ugly ...

 

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22 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

As actresses like to say "William was very good to me!".

 

:o

Did they mean on the set during the shootings, or later, back at their trailers;) 

But y'know James---

The way you stated something up there made me think(not an easy task, some would argue) Most(if not all) the movies I have on either tape or disc are movies I like, but you gave me the idea to one day go through them and find out if a certain director worked on most of them, or more than others.  And whom that might be.  

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

:o

Did they mean on the set during the shootings, or later, back at their trailers;) 

But y'know James---

The way you stated something up there made me think(not an easy task, some would argue) Most(if not all) the movies I have on either tape or disc are movies I like, but you gave me the idea to one day go through them and find out if a certain director worked on most of them, or more than others.  And whom that might be.  

Sepiatone

Wyler and Davis had an affair that started with the making of Jezebel and continued on when making The Letter.

I don't know about other actresses.   But as far as assisting actors with providing their legacy performance,  no one has more of those then Wyler.  This from Wiki:

Fourteen actors won Oscars under Wyler's direction, including Bette Davis in Jezebel (1938) and her nomination for The Letter (1940).[73] Davis summed up their work together: "It was he who helped me to realize my full potential as an actress. I met my match in this exceptionally creative and talented director."[63]:79[74]

Other Oscar winners were Olivia de Havilland in The Heiress (1949), Audrey Hepburn in her debut film, Roman Holiday (1953),[75] Charlton Heston in Ben-Hur (1959), and Barbra Streisand in her debut film, Funny Girl (1968).

Wyler's films garnered more awards for participating artists and actors than any other director in the history of Hollywood.[76] He received 12 Oscar nominations for Best Director, while dozens of his collaborators and actors won Oscars or were nominated.

 

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I can't call anyone "the best" as again, that's very subjective.  I know that John Ford is often referred to as "the best," but he primarily made westerns--which aren't one of my favorite genres (though I'm not opposed to them per se), so I would be averse to declaring him "the best."

But as for my personal favorites:

1. Alfred Hitchcock. His British films through The Birds is my personal favorite period of his career.  

2. John Huston. I especially love his collaborations with Bogie.

3. Ernst Lubitsch.  His films are fun.  I especially loved Cluny Brown, Trouble in Paradise, and Heaven Can Wait

4. Orson Welles. While many of his films were butchered by the studio, and perhaps not truly indicative of what he could really do, his films are always interesting.  I especially enjoyed Lady From Shanghai and The Magnificent Ambersons

5. Billy Wilder.  Wilder was very versatile and could make films in so many different genres.  I particlarly loved Sabrina, Some Like it Hot, Sunset Blvd. and The Apartment

6. Robert Siodmak. I love his noir. I especially enjoyed The Killers and Spiral Staircase

7. Preston Sturges. His films are always so silly, but I loved The Palm Beach Story and The Lady Eve

8. Nicholas Ray. His films are fantastic. I loved Rebel Without a Cause and They Live by Night

9. Michael Curtiz. He directed all those great films with my boy Errol.  I also loved Casablanca and Mildred Pierce

10. David Lean. I like Lean before he got into all his long, epic movies.  I loved Summertime and Blithe Spirit

 

If I needed to pick one from my list, I'd probably choose Hitchcock because I think his films may be the ones I re-watch the most.  Wilder would come in a close second. 

 

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I have no idea who was the greatest director. To pick the man who helmed more of my favourite films than any other, though, I would go with Michael Curtiz.

This is the man responsible for, among other films:

Captain Blood (1935), Charge of the Light Brigade (1936), Adventures of Robin Hood (1938, co-directed with William Keighley), Angels With Dirty Faces (1938), The Sea Hawk (1940), The Sea Wolf (1941), Casablanca (1943) and The Breaking Point (1950).

Other Curtiz films worthy of honorable mention: The Mad Genius, Doctor X, Mystery of the Wax Museum, Dodge City, Daughters Courageous, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Mildred Pierce, Life With Father, Young Man With A Horn and The Proud Rebel.

the-adventures-of-robin-hood-by-michael-

curtiz-e1514437652114.jpg?fit=609,414&ss

 

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My favorite director is Billy Wilder.  And my favorite Wilder films are (in order of release) The Major and the Minor, Five Graves to Cairo, Double Indemnity, The Lost Weekend, Sunset Blvd. (personal fave), Ace in the Hole, Stalag 17, Sabrina, The Seven Year Itch, Witness for the Prosecution, Some Like It Hot, The Apartment, One, Two, Three and The Fortune Cookie.

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3 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

My favorite director is Billy Wilder.  And my favorite Wilder films are (in order of release) The Major and the Minor, Five Graves to Cairo, Double Indemnity, The Lost Weekend, Sunset Blvd. (personal fave), Ace in the Hole, Stalag 17, Sabrina, The Seven Year Itch, Witness for the Prosecution, Some Like It Hot, The Apartment, One, Two, Three and The Fortune Cookie.

Wilder would be my #2 choice behind Wyler.     To me instead of 'who is the greatest' or even 'who is your favorite' the better question would be the good old desert island one;   if you could only watch movies from one director,  who would it be?

This is why I selected Wyler and why someone like Hitchcock and Ford (to a lesser degree) wouldn't be my choice (or even in the top 5);  not enough variety.   

Directors like Wyler,  Wilder,  Curtiz,  and Hawks (as well as others of course),  have a lot more variety in their film legacy.

 

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7 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

My favorite director is Billy Wilder.  And my favorite Wilder films are (in order of release) The Major and the Minor, Five Graves to Cairo, Double Indemnity, The Lost Weekend, Sunset Blvd. (personal fave), Ace in the Hole, Stalag 17, Sabrina, The Seven Year Itch, Witness for the Prosecution, Some Like It Hot, The Apartment, One, Two, Three and The Fortune Cookie.

& won 3 more for *The Apartment

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9 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Wyler and Davis had an affair that started with the making of Jezebel and continued on when making The Letter.

I don't know about other actresses.   But as far as assisting actors with providing their legacy performance,  no one has more of those then Wyler.  This from Wiki:

Fourteen actors won Oscars under Wyler's direction, including Bette Davis in Jezebel (1938) and her nomination for The Letter (1940).[73] Davis summed up their work together: "It was he who helped me to realize my full potential as an actress. I met my match in this exceptionally creative and talented director."[63]:79[74]

Other Oscar winners were Olivia de Havilland in The Heiress (1949), Audrey Hepburn in her debut film, Roman Holiday (1953),[75] Charlton Heston in Ben-Hur (1959), and Barbra Streisand in her debut film, Funny Girl (1968).

Wyler's films garnered more awards for participating artists and actors than any other director in the history of Hollywood.[76] He received 12 Oscar nominations for Best Director, while dozens of his collaborators and actors won Oscars or were nominated.

 

Do you mean dvd, as opposed to disc I never had those if different  You did your homework pal

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7 hours ago, TomJH said:

I have no idea who was the greatest director. To pick the man who helmed more of my favourite films than any other, though, I would go with Michael Curtiz.

This is the man responsible for, among other films:

Captain Blood (1935), Charge of the Light Brigade (1936), Adventures of Robin Hood (1938, co-directed with William Keighley), Angels With Dirty Faces (1938), The Sea Hawk (1940), The Sea Wolf (1941), Casablanca (1943) and The Breaking Point (1950).

Other Curtiz films worthy of honorable mention: The Mad Genius, Doctor X, Mystery of the Wax Museum, Dodge City, Daughters Courageous, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Mildred Pierce, Life With Father, Young Man With A Horn and The Proud Rebel.

the-adventures-of-robin-hood-by-michael-

curtiz-e1514437652114.jpg?fit=609,414&ss

 

superb shots

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