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California farm region faces furry new threat: swamp rodents


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California farm region faces furry new threat: swamp rodents

One of the most recent threats to California's environment has webbed feet, white whiskers, shaggy fur and orange buck teeth that could be mistaken for carrots.

"Boy, they're an ugly-looking thing," said David Passadori, an almond and walnut grower in central California. "And the way they multiply — jeez."

The swamp rodents, called nutria, are setting off alarms in California. They weigh about 20 pounds (9 kilograms) each and eat the equivalent of about a fourth of their weight each day by burrowing into riverbanks and chomping into plants that emerge from the water.

The animals can destroy the wetland habitats of rare and endangered species, degrading soil, ruining crops and carrying pathogens that may threaten livestock.

Most of all, they pose a public safety risk: Left unchecked, nutria could jeopardize California's water supply, especially if they get into the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta.

The delta is the "heartbeat of California's water infrastructure," according to Peter Tira, spokesman for the state's Department of Fish and Wildlife. It contains a network of more than 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) of canals and levees that protect the area from flooding, provide drinking water to millions of Californians and irrigate the lush agricultural region.

Now, armed with $10 million in state funds, the wildlife agency is deploying new tactics to eradicate the nutria and try to prevent the widespread destruction they are known to cause.

"Over the past two years, our best efforts were trying to not even control the population but keep it from exploding while we pursued the resources needed to actually pursue eradication," said Valerie Cook, environmental program manager for Fish and Wildlife's newly established Nutria Eradication Program.

"We haven't had nutria in California for 50 years, so nobody really knows much about them," Tira said. "We've had to learn on the job as we go."

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I hope all these illegals go to sanctuary cities in California for protection, they seem to be unwanted invaders.

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On 9/26/2019 at 12:55 AM, hamradio said:

Eh, what's up doc?

687829084_1280x720.jpg

read up on um. used to be farmed for their fur. they're high protein meat and their teeth are orange because of enamel. also said they're docile and may make good pets.

they're originally from south America and they're rodents not rats.

:)

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7 hours ago, NipkowDisc said:

read up on um. used to be farmed for their fur. they're high protein meat and their teeth are orange because of enamel. also said they're docile and may make good pets.

they're originally from south America and they're rodents not rats.

:)

Nippy;

Maybe you can tame one and get him to look for Timmy in the well.

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20 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Nippy;

Maybe you can tame one and get him to look for Timmy in the well.

BS! liberals will be the first ones to make pets out of um and when they start to wholesale exterminate liberals will start crying for them reminding us all that we share the earth with them and we should just lettum be. let all the homeless people living under municipal sewer grates adopt them as pets with the good housekeeping seal of approval from the sierra club and peta.

:lol:

eh what's up Gavin?

687829084_1280x720.jpg

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