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Recommendations for Marion Davies day?


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To my dear silent movie experts - are there any films being shown as part of the Marion Davies day on Monday that you'd particularly recommend?

 

Here is the day's schedule for your reference:

 

*The Red Mill* (1926) 6am ET

In this silent film, a barmaid sets out to win the heart of a handsome hero.

Cast: Marion Davies, Owen Moore, Louise Fazenda, George Siegmann Dir: William Goodrich BW-74 mins, TV-G

 

*Marianne* (1929) 7:15am ET

Two American soldiers fall for the same French girl during World War I.

Cast: George Baxter, Lawrence Gray, Cliff Edwards, Benny Rubin Dir: Robert Z. Leonard BW-111 mins, TV-G

 

*The Big Parade Of Comedy* (1964) 9:15am ET

Film clips highlight the funniest scenes and brightest comic stars in MGM's history.

Cast: Les Tremayne Dir: Robert Youngson. BW-90 mins, TV-G

 

*Not So Dumb* (1930) 10:45am ET

A scatterbrained miss throws a big party to advance her boyfriend's career.

Cast: Marion Davies, Elliott Nugent, Raymond Hackett, Franklin Pangborn Dir: King Vidor BW-76 mins, TV-G

 

*The Bachelor Father* (1931) 12:15pm ET

An aging Don Juan decides to get better acquainted with his grown children.

Cast: Marion Davies, Ralph Forbes, C. Aubrey Smith, Ray Milland Dir: Robert Z. Leonard BW-90 mins, TV-G

 

*Blondie Of The Follies* (1932) 1:45pm ET

Two showgirls on the road from rags to riches compete for the same man.

Cast: Marion Davies, Robert Montgomery, Billie Dove, Jimmy Durante Dir: Edmund Goulding BW-91 mins, TV-G

 

*Polly Of The Circus* (1932) 3:30pm ET

A small-town minister risks his career when he falls for a trapeze artist.

Cast: Marion Davies, Clark Gable, C. Aubrey Smith, Raymond Hatton Dir: Alfred Santell BW-70 mins, TV-G

 

*Peg O' My Heart* (1933) 4:45pm ET

A spunky Irish girl inherits a place in a British estate.

Cast: Marion Davies, Onslow Stevens, J. Farrell MacDonald, Juliette Compton Dir: Robert Z. Leonard BW-87 mins, TV-G

 

*Page Miss Glory* (1935) 6:15pm ET

A con artist creates a composite photo to win a beauty contest, then has to find the real thing.

Cast: Marion Davies, Pat O'Brien, Dick Powell, Mary Astor Dir: Mervyn LeRoy BW-93 mins, TV-G

 

*Show People* (1928) 8pm ET

In this silent film, a small-town girl tries to make it in Hollywood.

Cast: Marion Davies, William Haines, Dell Henderson, Paul Ralli Dir: King Vidor BW-79 mins, TV-G

 

*The Patsy* (1928) 9:30pm ET

In this silent film, a romantic young woman falls for her sister's fiance, then discovers her sister is cheating on him.

Cast: Marion Davies, Orville Caldwell, Marie Dressler, Dell Henderson Dir: King Vidor BW-77 mins, TV-G

 

*Captured on Film: The True Story of Marion Davies* (2001) 11:30pm ET

Documentary on the details of her life, career and her relationship with William Randolph Hearst.

Cast: Jeanine Basinger, Cari Beauchamp, Bob Board, Kevin Brownlow Dir: Hugh Munro Neely BW-57 mins, TV-PG

 

*Going Hollywood* (1933) 12:30am ET

A girl poses as a French maid to catch a singing star.

Cast: Marion Davies, Bing Crosby, Fifi D'Orsay, Stuart Erwin Dir: Raoul Walsh BW-78 mins, TV-G

 

*Operator 13* (1934) 2am ET

An actress signs up to spy for the Union, then falls for a Confederate officer.

Cast: Marion Davies, Gary Cooper, Jean Parker, Katharine Alexander Dir: Richard Boleslavsky BW-85 mins, TV-G

 

*Ever Since Eve* (1937) 3:30am ET

A plain-jane secretary masquerades as a beauty to win her boss's heart.

Cast: Marion Davies, Robert Montgomery, Frank McHugh, Patsy Kelly Dir: Lloyd Bacon BW-80 mins, TV-G

 

*Captured on Film: The True Story of Marion Davies* (2001) 5am ET

Documentary on the details of her life, career and her relationship with William Randolph Hearst.

Cast: Jeanine Basinger, Cari Beauchamp, Bob Board, Kevin Brownlow Dir: Hugh Munro Neely BW-57 mins, TV-PG

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Definitely the 3 silents: RED MILL; SHOW PEOPLE and THE PATSY. I think the rest are talkies so I decided to pass on those. Show People and Patsy seem to show up on TCM occasionally, but I don't think the Red Mill has been on in awhile. In fact I recently bought that one from WB. The documentary is also worth taping.

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*Going Hollywood* is great fun, and Davies gives terrific performances in *Blondie of the Follies, Peg o' My Heart,* and *Ever Since Eve*. The silents, as mentioned are all wonderful. But too bad they're showing the documentary twice and wasting a timeslot that could have been given to *The Fair Co-Ed* or some other rarely seen silent.

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... and where is the talkie *It's a Wise Child* ? This film has been basically unseen since 1931. It was screened a few years ago in Washington, DC but then disappeared again in a flurry of copyright baloney (for a film almost 80 years old). This is the only Davies talkie I haven't seen.....

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On TCM's site:

 

6:00am [silent] Red Mill, The (1926)

In this silent film, a barmaid sets out to win the heart of a handsome hero.

Cast: Marion Davies, Owen Moore, Louise Fazenda, George Siegmann *Dir: William Goodrich* BW-74 mins, TV-G

 

Ummmm, isn't it about time we restore the rightful director name to this enterprise? LOL!

 

Roscoe Arbuckle.

 

It's no longer a dirty name, ya know. ;)

 

If they can re-instate Dalton Trumbo's name from the blacklist days they surely can re-instate Roscoe's name.

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Jill,

 

The talkies do emphasize the fact that Marion was indeed a great actress and continued her career as a major star, not an Also-ran, (as many people still believe) well into the Mid 1930's! GOING HOLLYWOOD is an amazing film and really showcases Marion's great depth of talent.

 

I am disappointed though that they are only showing three of Her Silent films though. Also that there are no Silent premiers. Not even QUALITY STREET which has been on DVD, but not on TCM. Plus THE RED MILL is on so early in the morning. That's probably not going to boost the sales of the Warner Archive release much. Hopefully, THE PATSY will be out soon. Still it is wonderful to see Marion finally being honored and recognized like this.

 

I wonder is it at all possible that we could be seeing the Thames SHOW PEOPLE tomorrow, instead of the one that they normally run? I ask this because the recent Warner Chat seemed to clearly indicate that the plan was to release the Brownlow version on DVD with Carl Davis music score, and not the vintage Axt-Mendoza one. It likely won't happen, but we should be prepared just in case that it does.

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Good point Jill on Roscoe Arbuckle...

 

Also *Blondie of the Follies* is worth catching, a terrific little drama about to tenement pals and rivals (Davies and another major silent star, Billie Dove) who make it in show biz. Davies does a terrific Garbo impersonation and teams with Jimmy Durante of all people! This is a solid MGM film with the feel of the Warners lot (where Davies finished her career).

 

*Going Hollywood* and *Operator 13* both film Davies in luscious fashion. In the latter film, Davies has a scene with Gary Cooper where she is on a staircase with several close-ups. Gorgeous! The film won an Oscar nomination for cinematography. The music in *Going Hollywood* is great, and Bing Crosby's "Temptation" is not to be missed. And the surreal/dreamy "We'll Make Hay While the Sun Shines" is certainly a one of a kind musical number.

 

I also like *Cain and Mabel* in part because Davies and Clark Gable have terrific chemistry. Plus it's just plain funny. Ditto *Ever Since Eve* and *Page Miss Glory.*

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Just noticed TCM is skipping *The Florodora Girl,* a nice little film that co-stars Lawrence Gray and Ilka Chase and features the "Tell Me, Pretty Maiden" number. Also *Five and Ten,* a solid drama about a dime-store heiress trying to break into society and co-starring Leslie Howard.

 

Message was edited by: drednm

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I'm missing Cain and Mabel, Hearts Divided on this list. I particularly like Marion's chemistry with Dick Powell in that film. I think they had a little "thing" going on in their personal lives for awhile there.

 

But hey, we should all be thrilled they are giving Marion this day! I am going to email them and thank them. When they do something good they need feedback.

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> {quote:title=goldensilents wrote:}{quote}

> Ummmm, isn't it about time we restore the rightful director name to this enterprise? LOL!

>

> Roscoe Arbuckle.

>

> It's no longer a dirty name, ya know. ;)

 

 

 

Actually, Roscoe Arbuckle didn't direct a single foot of the finished version of THE RED MILL. Several years ago, I found a series of articles in Variety and The Exhibitor's Herald which told this very sad story.

 

True enough, Marion Davies was instrumental in getting this plum directing job for Arbuckle, but right from the start, it was more than he could handle. He couldn't coordinate the crowd and ensemble scenes in the picture, putting him way behind schedule. Two other directors, King Vidor and Ulrich Busch, were brought in to help Arbuckle with these scenes, while Arbuckle worked with the principals. However, when Arbuckle's dailies were screened, they were deemed unusable, and the remainder of the film had to be reshot by a third director (probably Hobart Henley, who was assigned to direct Davies' next feature, TILLIE THE TOILER). Arbuckle's nom de cine, William Goodrich (from his father's first and middle names) was retained in the credits for contractual reasons.

 

This was no isolated incident. In his post-scandal career, many of Arbuckle's friends tried to get him work, and he did direct and star in many two-reel comedies. After Arbuckle was acquitted in his last wrongful death trial, Buster Keaton put him in the director's chair for SHERLOCK JR. But Arbuckle was still emotionally spent from the trial, and Keaton felt that it was throwing off his comic judgement. So he took Arbuckle off the picture after a few weeks, and told him to get some rest.

 

Following THE RED MILL, Arbuckle started working at Paramount in 1927 and befriended one of its up-and-coming stars, Eddie Cantor, who asked him to direct his second feature, SPECIAL DELIVERY. Again, Arbuckle fell so far behind schedule that the New York premiere of the film was postponed for four weeks. On top of this, he had to begin a previously-scheduled vaudeville tour, leaving the picture unfinished. In his stead, Larry Semon was called in to complete SPECIAL DELIVERY and cut it for release.

 

Although Arbuckle continued to work until his death in 1933, he never got another assignment to direct a feature-length film. It's not hard to see why.

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> {quote:title=goldensilents wrote:}{quote}

> >I think the rest are talkies so I decided to pass on those.

>

> A mistake. She's just as delicious in talkies as she is in silents. :)

 

I know, but I have so many silent and pre-code dvds I can't get to, I've had to curtail my recording until I catch up.

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It is interesting info, though of course we don't really know how much is true, or how much could be hearsay by folks back then who STILL wanted to malign Roscoe somehow, keep him out of show business because his scandal hurt the industry so badly.

 

I think since his name as William Goodrich is still there due to a contractural obligation that the only decent thing to do is to remove the pseudonym and put his real name in the credits anyway. Then let historians decide who contributed what to the film.

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I agree.... The film industry reacted badly to the Arbuckle scandal even though he was innocent. There's a great movie topic here.

 

Around the same time Wallace Reid was dying of morphine addiction (not his fault), and then the William Desmond Taylor murder ruined the career of Mabel Normand (totally innocent).

 

Bad reactions from the Hollywood managers who cared only for the almighty dollar. Theater exhibitors also refused to show films (Arbuckle, Normand) so they became worthless commodities.

 

Mary Miles Minter was also ruined by the Taylor murder but she was likely an accessory (according to King Vidor)......

 

The Arbuckle "trials" rank among the worst miscarriages of justice in American history.

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Definitely miscarriages of justice. Not that they were saints back then but reasonable people could see behind the smokescreens, even then. It sold a ton of newspapers to play these events up and concoct theories and conspiracies, at the detriment to the stars' professional careers.

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The media events of their time..... I always felt bad for Mabel Normand because her excellent *The Extra Girl* was basically blackballed. Her career failure only hastened her early death via drugs.

 

Mary Miles Minter and her mother Charlotte Shelby always struck me as weirdly creepy (another great movie topic). King Vidor's excellent book on the Taylor murder didn't change my opinion of them. Indeed, Minter comes off (in the 60s?) are Norma Desmond's weirdo cousin. The Taylor murder ruined her in more ways than one. If I remember right, Vidor and Colleen Moore shopped the story idea for years but with no takers.

 

Crooked politicians and cops and muckraking newspapers fueled the Arbuckle scandal. What a shame. He's never been a favorite of mine but he certainly never deserved the treatment he got from the various American "systems."

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I think it's possible Taylor's murder could have been done by someone not directly in the Hollywood business. He did have a shady personal history. It also could have been a random act of violence. My feeling is that it's not likely to be an actress because they wouldn't risk their careers bumping somebody off.

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It was Minter's loony mother, Charlotte Shelby, according to Vidor's book. She had a long record of pay-offs to studio and Los Angeles police big shots. Although in the long run, Minter didn't have much of a future in films after being implicated in the murder.

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I got double recordings of a lot of films because I never fully trust my original recordings will still function on the DVD-Rs from several years ago. Plus things happen, like pixelization or like yesterday there was a storm warning during Peg O' My Heart and the emergency broadcast system ran a ticker about it. Thankfully I have an earlier recording off TCM from a few years ago. So to me it's worth it to get more than one recording.

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