Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
Sepiatone

IMAGE MAKERS

Recommended Posts

The great thing about this doc was going over the history and evolution of cinematography and camera equipment.  The sad part is that it never went beyond the lives of GREGG TOLAND and JAMES WONG HOWE.  No mention of those who came after and who were both inspired and influenced and too, have made and (some) who are still making inroads in the art of cinematography.....

GORDON WILLIS

SVEN NYKVIST

ERNEST HALLER

BRUCE SURLEES

JANUSZ KASMINSKI 

and

JOHN ALONZO

Another thing that struck me was how old KEVIN BROWNLOW looks!  Last I remember seeing him on TCM about anything he was much younger( must have been taped long ago I guess).  I always thought that his book NAPOLEON, about his search for all the pieces of the revolutionary ABEL GANCE epic and putting them all back together for public viewing would be, in the right hands, an excellent movie in itself. 

A lot of people( none here though) give no thought to the cinematographer when watching a movie and don't consider how their favorite scene in a movie might be more because of the cinematographer instead of any other factor.  But, in spite of anything posted here I still enjoyed the documentary very much.  

Sepiatone

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A very fine documentary.  All those photographs and film clips must have been a major undertaking to arrange.

Did you notice that Kevin Brownlow was wearing a TCM Classic Film Festival cap? 😉

(BTW, for anyone who missed it, the film is scheduled to be shown again on TCM on the 9th, 13th, and 27th.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cmovieviewer said:

A very fine documentary.  All those photographs and film clips must have been a major undertaking to arrange.

Did you notice that Kevin Brownlow was wearing a TCM Classic Film Festival cap? 😉

(BTW, for anyone who missed it, the film is scheduled to be shown again on TCM on the 9th, 13th, and 27th.)

Sounds good.  I set it to record for the later dates.  Wasn't sure if it was installments or repeats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One interesting thing I noticed last night was that the intros and wrap-ups with Ben were different for the two showings.

Both featured cinematographer Robert Yeoman as a guest, but the discussion topics were different.

So the additional showings later in the month may feature different introductory material as well.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really good documentary. Many fine examples and some entertaining anecdotes. High marks for interviewing the descendants of some of the featured cinematographers. Of course we can think of sequels that would be wonderful, like Film Noir Cinematographers of the 40s and 50s, or Color Cinematography up until, say, 1966 (end of the studio era).

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

The great thing about this doc was going over the history and evolution of cinematography and camera equipment.  The sad part is that it never went beyond the lives of GREGG TOLAND and JAMES WONG HOWE.  No mention of those who came after and who were both inspired and influenced and too, have made and (some) who are still making inroads in the art of cinematography.....

GORDON WILLIS

SVEN NYKVIST

ERNEST HALLER

BRUCE SURLEES

JANUSZ KASMINSKI 

and

JOHN ALONZO

Another thing that struck me was how old KEVIN BROWNLOW looks!  Last I remember seeing him on TCM about anything he was much younger( must have been taped long ago I guess).  I always thought that his book NAPOLEON, about his search for all the pieces of the revolutionary ABEL GANCE epic and putting them all back together for public viewing would be, in the right hands, an excellent movie in itself. 

A lot of people( none here though) give no thought to the cinematographer when watching a movie and don't consider how their favorite scene in a movie might be more because of the cinematographer instead of any other factor.  But, in spite of anything posted here I still enjoyed the documentary very much.  

Sepiatone

 

He's probably pushing 90 by now. (Brownilow)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Hibi said:

I enjoyed it too. How many parts are there to the docu?

Hibi,

There's just one documentary (91 minutes) being shown multiple times on TCM this month.  (TCM seems to be a major partner in the production of the film.)  However, there may be different introductions done by Ben for each showing to discuss different aspects of cinematography.  Here's the IMDB page for the film:

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt11028234/

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I SEE. Thanks. I thought there were more parts with other cinematographers. Too bad!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, very few films have outstanding cinematography e.g. Citizen Kane, Soy Cuba, while “outstanding” can only be obtained in the black-n-white medium. :(

How does one obtain deep, clear focal depth…small aperture with strong lighting? :huh:

How important is the lens to clarity…which lenses offer the highest resolutions, those with fixed focal lengths? :wacko:

How do you obtain a wide-angle shot without distortion…when is distortion desirable? :blink:

How important are angles to emphasizing prospective? 🤭

What is more important to a film, its cinematography or sound and/or music? 🎶

Why do many films today extremely underexpose the image...deliberately avoiding detail? <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...