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NickAndNora34

What are Some Old Movies You Would Recommend to Young People?

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On 11/8/2019 at 1:22 PM, Forty-One said:

It all depends what you mean by "young people". For instance, I would not recommend "Casablanca" or "The Innocents" (Deborah Kerr) to a kid less than 14 years old. But I would recommend "7 Brides for 7 Brothers" or The Sound of Music or Ivanhoe. The list is actually endless, but we need a more specific age bracket in order to come up with some suggestions, more fitting for that age group.

How about age 16-26?

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Ok maybe I should clarify... I want to recommend classic films to new fans of old movies (or people who have only seen some Hitchcock and other popular ones) between the ages of 16 and 25. If that helps. 

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On 11/8/2019 at 4:23 PM, TopBilled said:

There's a good book called The Best Old Movies for Families, written by Ty Burr.

Screen Shot 2019-11-08 at 2.24.13 PM.jpeg

I see Buster Keaton on the cover, under "Old".  Buster's spiritual link with Wile E. Coyote means you could show just about anything, and it would make converts, even more than Chaplin or Lloyd.  (Especially among a demographic that thinks all silent movies have cops throwing pies at each other.)

Sherlock Jr. gets a little too strange by the last reel--despite its Daffy Duck-homaged first half--but otherwise just about anything.  Buster's coolness was ahead of its time.

Not sure about Some Like It Hot on the cover ("Best"), as we live in a decade that wishfully takes everything out of context, but better than a cautious maybe on whether The Seven Year Itch would win over Marilyn-curious older teens for being its own over-the-top spoof on 50's toxic chauvinism.  A best defense is a good pre-emptive offense, and Billy Wilder knew how to deliver comic offense.  B)

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2 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Ok maybe I should clarify... I want to recommend classic films to new fans of old movies (or people who have only seen some Hitchcock and other popular ones) between the ages of 16 and 25. If that helps. 

That helps a great deal, thanks! Between 16 to 25, let me think about it....

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2 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Ok maybe I should clarify... I want to recommend classic films to new fans of old movies (or people who have only seen some Hitchcock and other popular ones) between the ages of 16 and 25. If that helps. 

OK, here is my list of movies I would recommend to young people, between the ages of 16 to 25. As always, this list is not in any particular order, I type the movies as they pop up in my mind:

An Affair to Remember

Anatomy of Murder

Casablanca

West Side Story

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers

A Lion in Winter

How the West was Won

The Day the Earth Stood Still (Robert Wise, 1951)

2001, a Space Odyssey

The Shawshank Redemption

Barry Lyndon (of course)

The Egyptian

Dial M for Murder

Rear Window

The Longest Day

On the Waterfront

Ben-Hur (1925, silent, as well as 1959)

Night of the Living Dead (1968, a cult movie)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

A Few Good Men

The Big Country

North by Northwest

Laurence of Arabia

The Graduate

The Verdict

To Kill a Mockingbird

In the Heat of the Night

12 Angry Men

Judgement at Nuremberg

Annie Hall

Not an exhaustive list.... 

 

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I would tend to chose light comedies as an introduction to classic movies because young viewers may not relate well to heavy drama concerning issues which are unfamiliar to them. 

Jewel Robbery (1932)

I Love You Again (1940)

Love Crazy (1941)

The Ex-Mrs. Bradford (1936)

Love in the Afternoon (1957)

The Last of Mrs. Cheyney (1937)

 

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12 hours ago, EricJ said:

I see Buster Keaton on the cover, under "Old".  Buster's spiritual link with Wile E. Coyote means you could show just about anything, and it would make converts, even more than Chaplin or Lloyd.  (Especially among a demographic that thinks all silent movies have cops throwing pies at each other.)

Sherlock Jr. gets a little too strange by the last reel--despite its Daffy Duck-homaged first half--but otherwise just about anything.  Buster's coolness was ahead of its time.

Not sure about Some Like It Hot on the cover ("Best"), as we live in a decade that wishfully takes everything out of context, but better than a cautious maybe on whether The Seven Year Itch would win over Marilyn-curious older teens for being its own over-the-top spoof on 50's toxic chauvinism.  A best defense is a good pre-emptive offense, and Billy Wilder knew how to deliver comic offense.  B)

I guess I wasn't over-analyzing the images used on the cover of Ty Burr's book. Not sure if he selected those images, or if the publisher did. We should point out that ROBIN HOOD appears under 'The' and WEST SIDE STORY appears under 'For.' Meanwhile SINGIN' IN THE RAIN appears under 'Movies.'

I wouldn't read too much significance into it, only that these images were used to sell the book.  Plus they were films he describes watching with his daughter, inside the book. They could just as easily have used a shot of a James Dean movie under 'Best,' or something besides TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD for 'Families.'

It's been awhile since I've read the book. I have a copy of it on my desk. But if I recall correctly, he and his daughter most enjoyed THE HARVEY GIRLS which is not on the cover. And he said his daughter and her friends got a kick out of JOHNNY GUITAR.

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Yeah, and probably repeating myself, most of us have no opportunities to introduce many young people to "classic" movies, unless of course, some aspect of our lives or livelihoods  bring us into contact with a good number of them.  For most of us, our influence can go no further than our own children, and perhaps a few of their friends. And in that case, our viewing those movies surreptitiously plants that seed.  While neither of my kids(kids?  Ach!  They're in their FORTIES!)  make it a habit of watching "classic" movies, they're long past and above rejecting them out of hand because "they're old!" or, "Eww!  They're in BLACK AND WHITE!" or some such crap.  And as SANS said, comedies are a good starting point, or at least some with a few comic elements.  ie: DEAD END isn't really considered a comedy, but THE DEAD END KIDS do supply enough "comic relief" that both my daughters enjoyed the movie.  And for a few days after they even adopted the lingo( Aehhhhhh...I'll WALLOP ya!" ; "Aehhh..yur Muddah wears ARMY BOOTS!")!  They had a lot of fun with that, and I suppose that helps too.  ;)

Sepiatone

 

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For the 18 to 25 crowd, even though it's (shudders!) filmed in black and white, I would think that Raoul Walsh's WHITE HEAT would keep them interested. With its fast pace and Cagney's unpredictable psycho character at the centre of the action I suspect they wouldn't have boredom set in.

And with the film's famous "Made it, Ma! Top of the World!" atomic imagery climax I would think this is one oldie that would have even younger viewers feeling energized, even in comparison to all the CGI, fast edit action films produced today.

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  • MY MAN GODFREY (the humor is still very fresh, I saw someone describe it as a lot of it as being "millennial humor")
  • THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES (an utterly timeless and down to earth story/experience)
  • TEA AND SYMPATHY (this one I might recommend the most out of all of these because the themes are still timely today)
  • ANGELS WITH DIRTY FACES (awesome all around without feeling old which I know might put some younger viewers off to watching it, the ending is outstanding)
  • ROPE (I always get a good response from this one, people will surely find the subtext interesting)
  • STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (very similar to ROPE and I also get good reactions from this one)
  • LIBELED LADY (still funny as all hell)
  • THE MORTAL STORM (themes in the film can be connected to current events)
  • A FACE IN THE CROWD (themes in the film can be connected to current events)
  • THE SET-UP (quickie noir with wonderful atmosphere)
  • GUN CRAZY (totally ahead of it's time with some great characters)
  • CAPE FEAR (super creepy and I'd also say is ahead of it's time)
  • A PATCH OF BLUE (a very touching story presented in a simple way that's easy to get pulled into)

This is part of my bigger and more general list that I usually pull most of my recommendations from when trying to suggest a film to someone around my age. 

On 11/10/2019 at 3:30 AM, SansFin said:

I would tend to chose light comedies as an introduction to classic movies because young viewers may not relate well to heavy drama concerning issues which are unfamiliar to them. 

Jewel Robbery (1932)

I Love You Again (1940)

Love Crazy (1941)

The Ex-Mrs. Bradford (1936)

Love in the Afternoon (1957)

The Last of Mrs. Cheyney (1937)

 

JEWEL ROBBERY should be at the top of everyone's lists!!! I got the opportunity to see it on the big screen earlier this year with a majority 20s-30s crowd and it was one of the most wonderful experiences I've ever had watching a film. Half the fun of it was waiting for audience members to react to the weed gags. I don't think anyone can really understand how crazy and fun precodes could be until they've watched it.

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Great topic and one I sometimes wrestle with.  I indoctrinated my daughter with classic film but my grandchildren are another matter entirely.

I stay away from musicals or comedies as they are considered corny by millennials, I concentrate on relatable themes or movies with children of a similar age in them.  "A Tree Grows In Brooklyn" , "The Miracle Worker" "The Window" "To Kill A Mockingbird' and "Bright Road" are good examples, later "Blackboard Jungle" and "To Sir With Love".

My go-to intro to classic film for those a little older is "A Place In The Sun".  I call this a woman's picture from a man's point of view.  

 

 

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I've actually indoctrinated a few people, young and old, to classic films with varying success. And there are a few things I've learned in my experience:

  • You can't simply name a film because you like it. - You have to remember, you all are used to the pace and feel of classic film. Newbies have to be brought in gradually.
  • Young people can be hyper - In the age of multi tasking, its not the best idea to show them slow moving dramas.
  • Chauvinism isn't really a major issue for those under 30 or so
  • Diversity is a major issue overall

Taking all of that into account and also factoring in that the best films for newbies aren't necessarily hits. But, just good entertaining films.

For guys, I normally go after war movies, gangster movies, adventure movies. Bullets or Ballots (1936), is good because the pace is moving. And it shows black people not in stereotypical roles, later in the movies, they do quite well actually. War movies like Sahara (1943), Destination Tokyo (1943), Lawrence of Arabia (1962). North by Northwest (1959) is another film I recommend often.

I go for technicolor when I can. Those vivid colors are something people expect to see. Anything with Marilyn Monroe or Audrey Hepburn can work. These are two names they know well. And its more about their style than the films themselves. Young people aren't really so offended by the chauvinism nor the Mickey Rooney character in Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961). This is a film I recommend often and I have yet to heard a negative comment. They were more upset at how Holly treated Varjak.

Musicals work. Networks are airing live action musicals. So it would reason that people would want to see the film versions of great musicals also.

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One autumn I led a series of Saturday screenings at my public library. I organized it because I wanted to meet other classic film fans in the community. We had people from 20 to 60 show up.

LIFEBOAT (1944) went over very well. The women were just as engaged in the story as the men.

THE PHILADELPHIA STORY (1940) went over the best. This was my most popular selection. They were really caught up in Hepburn's performance and they loved Weidler's scene stealing song.

POWER OF THE PRESS (1943) went over okay. I wanted a film from about journalism, and this one had been written by Sam Fuller. I liked the performances, but I think everyone else found it a bit dull.

REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE (1955) went over well. They loved James Dean's "cool" performance.

MEET JOHN DOE (1941) was a bit too overwrought for them in spots. But I think they did appreciate the ending and what Capra and Riskin were trying to accomplish.

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Very interesting topic.  I struggle to even get people my own age to understand why I find movies that are 70-80 years old fascinating.  So how to get young people to enjoy them?

I'd say start with a mystery, like Laura.  The plot is intriguing and the performances sparkle.

A good story can overcome the issues of time and place that can hinder younger people from watching "some old black and white movie."  I'm willing to admit that, as I got older, I found that early hairstyles, clothing and manners of speech meant less to me, and I was able to see the universal themes that were the underpinning of so many early features...

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Several of the members of my film club that I talk to frequently, have seen a solid amount of classic “older” movies. It’s quite refreshing to see younger people enjoying things from the 1930s-1960s. I say “younger people” as if I’m not a “younger people” lol. 
 

A lot of them have already seen Singin in the Rain, and a lot of them like Hitchcock and things like M with Peter Lorre, 2001: A Space Odyssey, etc, so feel free to recommend things that are for a little more hardcore fans. I’m loving the responses so far; thank you everyone!

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13 hours ago, overeasy said:

Very interesting topic.  I struggle to even get people my own age to understand why I find movies that are 70-80 years old fascinating. 

I don't know your age, but there's folks in my family that are older than 70-80 years old that can't fathom why I like watching what they call,  "Old, dusty moldy movies".  :rolleyes:

Plus;  Ya gotta wonder why the member who goes by FORTY ONE  included THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION on his/her list of "old" movies they'd recommend for 16-25 year olds.  Despite the movie itself being 25 years old, I know several "kids" as young as 16( even one 13) who like that movie and don't really consider it that old. And at my age I still consider it "modern"  :D 

Sepiatone

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

I don't know your age, but there's folks in my family that are older than 70-80 years old that can't fathom why I like watching what they call,  "Old, dusty moldy movies".  :rolleyes:

Plus;  Ya gotta wonder why the member who goes by FORTY ONE  included THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION on his/her list of "old" movies they'd recommend for 16-25 year olds.  Despite the movie itself being 25 years old, I know several "kids" as young as 16( even one 13) who like that movie and don't really consider it that old. And at my age I still consider it "modern"  :D 

Sepiatone

I picked "Forty-One" because it is the number by which Ben Hur was known when he was a prisoner on board the Roman galleys in the 1959 classic.

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13 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Several of the members of my film club that I talk to frequently, have seen a solid amount of classic “older” movies. It’s quite refreshing to see younger people enjoying things from the 1930s-1960s. I say “younger people” as if I’m not a “younger people” lol. 

 

What's important is you get feedback from the members. There is such a wide range from a whole century of movie making. It can seem overwhelming to someone new. You want to constantly have conversations about what they like or would like to see. Be it a star or type of film.

Some might like to see trench coats. Others might want to see the fashions of a certain day. Something in the news might pertain to an old film. Maybe someone famous today, had a relative in films . I still find actors in films that I didn't realize had a film career.

The more you know about what they would like to see, the easier it is to recommend films to them.

 

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I believe that most people have heard the name: Douglas Fairbanks and might have an interest in seeing some of his work. You may wish to introduce him to a young audience via his sophisticated and genteel comedy-mystery movie: The Mystery of the Leaping Fish (1916).

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The Bad Seed:  of course hopefully that wouldn't wake-up the little monster in some of these kids!

image.jpeg.28d14acff8dff2c0fc3b0ff9103ce499.jpeg

 

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9 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

The Bad Seed:  of course hopefully that wouldn't wake-up the little monster in some of these kids!

image.jpeg.28d14acff8dff2c0fc3b0ff9103ce499.jpeg

Yes Rhoda Penmark might be a role model to some misguided souls.

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19 hours ago, Forty-One said:

I picked "Forty-One" because it is the number by which Ben Hur was known when he was a prisoner on board the Roman galleys in the 1959 classic.

That's interesting, but still doesn't explain your inclusion of THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION on your list of "old" movies.  (RIF ;) )

Sepiatone

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20 hours ago, Forty-One said:

I picked "Forty-One" because it is the number by which Ben Hur was known when he was a prisoner on board the Roman galleys in the 1959 classic.

I would have picked 33, 45 or 78. <grin>

(Still having a miserable time with my tablet and emojis)

If wait! 53 - Herbie!

(Some do get cranky when you change your handle)

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16 hours ago, SansFin said:

I believe that most people have heard the name: Douglas Fairbanks and might have an interest in seeing some of his work. You may wish to introduce him to a young audience via his sophisticated and genteel comedy-mystery movie: The Mystery of the Leaping Fish (1916).

Ah, speaking of Fairbanks - this is nowhere as well remembered as his other works but WHEN THE CLOUDS ROLL BY is super irresistible. It's so colorful and packed with action that I don't think anyone could be legitimately bored while watching it. I think some younger people are hesitant to put on silents because they're afraid of being bored to death but damn, if this one isn't a winner!

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