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Why is such a great movie getting such a lousy time slot on TCM?


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You take it a bit out of context, TB... what was intended was...

When it comes to "social injustice", there shouldn't be any "pro" and "con" debate.  Injustice is wrong regardless, and I feel no empathetic individual (with even just half a brain) can provide an intelligent sounding argument in favor of it! 

But I see your point and do agree.

Sepiatone

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The problem is that so-called "social justice" is often as misused as "patriotism" (or other ideas) as a veneer for being a really nasty person while claiming that your nasty behavior is not only acceptable, but virtuous because you're fighting some perceived wrong.  For good examples of this, read up on "woke knitting" or "Young Adult" Twitter

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2 hours ago, Fedya said:

The problem is that so-called "social justice" is often as misused as "patriotism" (or other ideas) as a veneer for being a really nasty person while claiming that your nasty behavior is not only acceptable, but virtuous because you're fighting some perceived wrong.  For good examples of this, read up on "woke knitting" or "Young Adult" Twitter

That "YA Twitter" article gave me a headache. It further demonstrates why I'll never use Twitter.

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I know we are getting far afield, but Deval Patrick,  who just joined the Dem contest for President,  used "woke" in the speech he gave in Long Beech CA over the weekend.   First time I have heard this term used by someone at his "level' of politics (71st Governor of Massachusetts, from 2007 to 2015.).

Looks like Booker and Patrick are going to try to out-woke each other.  

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It is not my favorite Colbert performance, as I vaguely recall from watching it on some long-ago TCM airing, as she is constantly complaining or whining about every little thing and is the stereotypical helpless female of old. Not at all a "woke" performance, to make a lame attempt to tie the two topics together.

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10 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

It is not my favorite Colbert performance, as I vaguely recall from watching it on some long-ago TCM airing, as she is constantly complaining or whining about every little thing and is the stereotypical helpless female of old. Not at all a "woke" performance, to make a lame attempt to tie the two topics together.

The complaining or whining comes very early on as she adjusts to a radically new environment and the helplessness evaporates when it all gets real. There's an astonishing scene after Fonda has returned from battle wounded. Colbert has searched for him in the rain and brought him to shelter. He lies in a corner dazedly recounting his experiences to nobody in particular as Colbert determinedly strips away the clothing from his shoulder, cleans the (very messy) wound and then dresses the wound, working deliberately as she divides her focus between her work and her husband's story. It's an extended scene with an extremely high level of intensity and Colbert (and Fonda) handled it superbly. Bravo to both, and to John Ford.

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30 minutes ago, DougieB said:

The complaining or whining comes very early on as she adjusts to a radically new environment and the helplessness evaporates when it all gets real. There's an astonishing scene after Fonda has returned from battle wounded. Colbert has searched for him in the rain and brought him to shelter. He lies in a corner dazedly recounting his experiences to nobody in particular as Colbert determinedly strips away the clothing from his shoulder, cleans the (very messy) wound and then dresses the wound, working deliberately as she divides her focus between her work and her husband's story. It's an extended scene with an extremely high level of intensity and Colbert (and Fonda) handled it superbly. Bravo to both, and to John Ford.

Thanks. Though Colbert is highly regarded for her work in romantic comedies, she was certainly capable of giving strong dramatic performances. We also see this in SINCE YOU WENT AWAY (1944) and THREE CAME HOME (1950).

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I'm not really a fan of the types of films that John Ford makes, though I wouldn't not watch him, but I may be interested in The Grapes of Wrath (because I've never seen it) and the John Ford documentary.

EDIT: I have seen Mister Roberts and I did enjoy that film very much.  So much apparently that I accidentally own 3 copies of it.

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  • 6 months later...

I think I know, TB!

I'll bet it's some kind'a ongoing thing the TCM programmers have against any movie about drums that doesn't have Gene Krupa in it.

(...this of course is just a guess) 

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I love Drums Along the Mohawk. It's one of my fav Henry Fonda movies. That scene where he's trying to outrun the Indians to get help puts me on the edge of my seat every time. I like Claudette Colbert, but I'm still not sure about her casting in this type of movie. I think she does a good job, I just always thought it was unusual. Well, maybe that's why they picked her. 🤔

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Very unpopular opinions:

I dislike John Ford's direction. There are very few of his films I'd ever watch twice.

I absolutely despised DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK, actually found it distasteful.

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