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Have you seen these 10 classic films..?


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40 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

I have not seen Never a Dull MomentTaza Son of Cochise, or Running.

TCM broadcasts NEVER A DULL MOMENT (1950) occasionally, since it's an RKO film in the Turner library. The title was reused for a 1968 Disney flick starring Dick Van Dyke & Edward G. Robinson, but the plot of the later film differed substantially.

TAZA SON OF COCHISE is currently on Starz streaming and is in rotation on the Encore Westerns channel. It was one of the early Douglas Sirk-Rock Hudson collaborations and is in Technicolor. 

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5 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Did you like the remake of THE STEPFORD WIVES? Or do you prefer the original?

I actually haven't seen the remake.  I heard they turned the film into a comedy and that kind of turned me off from wanting to watch it.

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I wanted to discuss NEVER A DULL MOMENT (1950) a bit more, if that's okay. Actually the ongoing collaboration of Irene Dunne & Fred MacMurray.

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Back in 1939 the two stars made INVITATION TO HAPPINESS at MacMurray's home studio Paramount. It was a sports-themed melodrama, with MacMurray cast in the role of a scrappy boxer and Dunne as the upper crust woman who falls for him. It was a hit with audiences.

They would, of course, re-team for the RKO family comedy NEVER A DULL MOMENT in 1950. Then in 1952, they collaborated again on a weekly radio series called Bright Star. That time the story had them running a newspaper office in a small town (she was the editor and he was her star reporter). Bright Star lasted a full season and there are 31 episodes that can be enjoyed, for free, at the following webpage:

https://archive.org/details/OTRR_Bright_Star_Singles

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15 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I have not seen Never a Dull MomentTaza Son of Cochise, or Running.

This is my most-watched list yet. I've seen seven of 10, the three I haven't seen being the exact same Lawrence listed.I thought certainly I'd seen just about everything Michael Douglas had ever done, but I can't recall ever even hearing of a movie where he's a marathoner.

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6 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

This is my most-watched list yet. I've seen seven of 10, the three I haven't seen being the exact same Lawrence listed.I thought certainly I'd seen just about everything Michael Douglas had ever done, but I can't recall ever even hearing of a movie where he's a marathoner.

RUNNING (1979) was a Canadian production which didn't do well in theaters but seemed to turn a profit on network TV/cable broadcasts. Douglas claims he took the part because the script made him cry and he wanted to play a more relatable character, even though the character would be one of many non-conformists he played throughout his career. He also says it put him in the best shape of his life. He had apparently been smoking two packs of cigarettes a day when he made THE CHINA SYNDROME, but when he made RUNNING, of course, he had to rethink his health when he began training.

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Cheat Sheet:

51. WHITE WOMAN (1933) with Carole Lombard & Charles Laughton.

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52. DOUBLE INDEMNITY (1944) with Fred MacMurray & Barbara Stanwyck.

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53. THE PRIVATE AFFAIRS OF BEL AMI (1947) with George Sanders & Ann Dvorak.

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54. THE GUNFIGHTER (1950) with Gregory Peck.

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55. SOMEBODY UP THERE LIKES ME (1956) with Everett Sloane & Paul Newman.

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56. THE PARENT TRAP (1961) with Hayley Mills & Hayley Mills.

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57. RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY (1962) with Mariette Hartley & James Drury.

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58. SOLDIER BLUE (1970) with Candice Bergen.

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59. THE NATURAL (1984) with Robert Redford.

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60. DEAD MAN WALKING (1995) with Sean Penn & Susan Sarandon.

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21 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Okay, I figured that was The Gunfighter, which I've also seen, but I hesitated to say. So, I've missed out on 51, 53 and 58. Seven out of 10, tied for the most I've seen on any of these lists.

#51 is currently on YouTube. WHITE WOMAN (1933) was the first time Laughton & Lombard worked together. They were both under contract to Paramount.

According to Elsa Lanchester, Laughton did not feel Lombard was properly trained as an actress and tried to coach her for their most dramatic scenes together. Apparently he changed his mind about her and became a fan of Lombard, since they did make another movie together later.

WHITE WOMAN has a very stunning final sequence that involves Laughton and costar Charles Bickford. It's a movie you don't forget.

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Love DOUBLE INDEMNITY, THE GUNFIGHTER,  THE PARENT TRAP and DEAD MAN WALKING (which I will take over the one-sided I WANT TO LIVE! any day, despite Susan Hayward's wonderful performance, but the movie was too darn one-sided. At least DEAD MAN WALKING looked at both points of view from the pro/anti-death penalty debate).

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6 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Love DOUBLE INDEMNITY, THE GUNFIGHTER,  THE PARENT TRAP and DEAD MAN WALKING (which I will take over the one-sided I WANT TO LIVE! any day, despite Susan Hayward's wonderful performance, but the movie was too darn one-sided. At least DEAD MAN WALKING looked at both points of view from the pro/anti-death penalty debate).

Yeah, I think Robert Wise's film is very much influenced by liberal politics. But in a way I like it for that reason because it doesn't try to deceive. It just sticks to its own point of view, no matter what, and builds a whole story around it.

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I don't begrudge Wise's point of view, but I still prefer DEAD MAN WALKING for the reasons I stated above. I like it when a movie can present itself with both points of view over something so very much controversial, and certainly capital punishment fits in that category.

 

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