Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Conservatives in Hollywood? .......


Recommended Posts

  • 4 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
logo-pjmedia.svg
 

Beyond Bond: Sean Connery's Impact on the Culture

 
BY RICK MORAN OCT 31, 2020 12:33 PM ET
 
70c17244-1176-4b6d-b84b-bdac8ea13259-730x487.jpg
 
Sean Connery, who died peacefully in his sleep at his home in the Bahamas, was that rare Hollywood actor whose impact on culture transcended the roles he played on film.
 
Link to post
Share on other sites

default-author-d4208ec6b76b19eac93568d71a25b1dd53bd246123516bb7f2087aa088f56817.jpg

starship1.jpg

STARSHIP TROOPERS Turns 20: Does This Film (and book) Lay the Foundation for a Post-Democratic West? Yes.

“Liberal democracy,” frets the Main Stream Media, is dying, and far-left journalists are demanding conservatives be good little cucks and help them contain the “far right” [Why liberal democracy only dies when conservatives help, by Matt O’Brien, Washington Post, May 17, 2017]. Of course, by “democracy” journalists mean government by unelected judges, shadowy plutocrats and increasingly overt commissars willing to ban speech and organizations they don’t like, and continuing mass immigration no matter who wins the elections. But whatever you want to call it, this System which governs the West is slowly committing suicide, as the managerial elite replaces the European populations who created self-government with Third World peoples incapable of maintaining it.

One of the few films which imagined a post-democratic age was 1997’s Starship Troopers, one of the most misunderstood films in history. The source material, Robert Heinlen’s 1959 masterpiece, is a must read. [6 Reasons Why 'Starship Troopers' Is the New 'The Art of War', by Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, February 5, 2015]

 

During one early scene, a teacher (“Jean Rasczak”) lectures on the collapse of the egalitarian era.

Jean Rasczak: This year in history, we talked about the failure of democracy, how the social scientists of the 21st Century brought our world to the brink of chaos. We talked about the veterans, how they took control and imposed the stability that has lasted for generations since. We talked about the rights and privileges between those who served in the armed forces and those who haven't, therefore called citizens and civilians. [to a student] You. Why are only citizens allowed to vote?

Student: It's a reward. Something the federation gives you for doing federal service.

Jean Rasczak: No. Something given has no basis in value. When you vote, you are exercising political authority, you're using force. And force, my friends, is violence. The supreme authority from which all other authorities are derived.

Read More >> https://vdare.com/articles/starship-troopers-turns-20-does-this-film-and-book-lay-the-foundation-for-a-post-democratic-west-yes

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
Under the Black Flag
 
November 2020

Hollywood Remakes the Culture

 
 
Hollywood_Sign_PB050006
 

If you thought “woke” hysteria killed comedy, fear no longer: Hollywood has come to the rescue. The Academy—a misnomer if there ever was one—has decreed that a movie can no longer be eligible for an award unless it meets certain criteria. All “Best Picture” nominees must include storylines about underrepresented groups, and a significant percentage of a film’s lead actors and support staff must be members of said underrepresented groups, namely “people of color,” homosexuals, transsexuals, and the disabled—the latter preferably of mixed race.

The greedy lowlifes who run La-La Land will now make sure filmmakers tick all the boxes when casting a movie. Hollywood has depended on recycling past triumphs since at least the late ’50s. Now, as they prepare to remake Casablanca, imagine the hoops they’ll have to jump through.

Rick would have to be played by a black actor, probably Idris Elba, and Ilsa, let’s say by an Arab lesbian (yet to be discovered). The new script would have Rick stuck in Casablanca after a failed drug deal, stalked by Major Strasser, a drug enforcement agent of Hawaiian background who has a fetish for Nazi uniforms. The only white person in the movie would be the disabled piano player, who tickles the ivories with his toes, having burnt both his hands to a crisp while stoking the embers in his coal-fired boiler.

Victor Laszlo, Ilsa’s hubby, would be a Saudi sensitivity training expert who used to pimp her out to women until his life was transformed by reading the Koran. He and Ilsa began their affair at university in Riyadh, were separated after he was arrested by the religious police, and were reunited in Beirut before ending up in Casablanca. 

Captain Renault would be played by the incarcerated R & B star R. Kelly, furloughed from his present residence in prison for the duration of the shoot. The love of vulnerable, underage girls shared by both the R & B star and the character he would play makes this casting a natural selection that will be very popular with fans.

Can you envision the endless possibilities, dear readers, once the woke brigades get a hold of past Hollywood films? Denzel Washington could be a credible Rhett Butler; Rihanna could play Scarlett. The trouble would start with the characters of Big Sam and Mammy, ditto when remaking Porgy and Bess. Never mind, though, just fill the hospital scene in Atlanta with transgender and nonbinary people shown moaning and groaning while Sherman’s bombs are falling, and the remake will be lauded for righting historical wrongs.

The old Tarzan films would obviously pose a problem. Meghan Markle would make a believable Jane, with Tarzan played by Jamie Foxx. It’s the natives I’m worried about. They will have to be of Scandinavian extraction. Since the movies would be shot in Norway, loincloths would give extras very little protection against frostbite.

The Godfather franchise, rebooted as The Godmother, will pose no such problems. The famous scene where Al Pacino shoots the bad white police captain in the face will be reshot exactly as in the original, with Cardi B blasting away at a Sterling Hayden lookalike. The 1972 racist joke of “Wops versus Cops” will no longer apply, not with the new Cardi Corleone, Lizzo as the Godmother, and a supporting cast of other black female stars burning up the silver screen.

So there you have it, a new, improved, and politically correct movie industry entering the new millennium with a bang. Misandry, Greek for hatred of the male sex, will be the theme behind every blockbuster. Wonder Woman will make mincemeat of Superman, unless in his latest reincarnation he has a sex change. 

The opportunities are endless: Every Western can be reshot with women taking the roles once upon a time hogged by the likes of John Wayne and Randolph Scott. Imagine what they can do with the remake of The Wild Bunch. The Mexican baddies will of course be Nordic types, and the wonderful Bill Holden’s role as an aging antihero will be taken by the aging Meghan Markle once again.

The role reversals now required by Hollywood and the so-called Academy are not as outlandish as they sound. Not when a once-credible newspaper like The New York Times has turned into a leftist propaganda rag promoting the revisionist history that the American Revolution was fought in order to preserve slavery.

Of course, the new, improved Hollywood will also continue to take its cue from the standards set by the massive  Chinese market, where Communist leaders micromanage all life, including the movies.

Freedom of speech is supposed to allow individuals and groups to defend their interests against encroaching authority. The reversal of the ideals of Voltaire practiced by the left and its media allies is nothing less than a coup to seize power over our thought processes, once and for all. Hollywood is just following orders.                             

 
 

Taki Theodoracopulos

Taki Theodoracopulos is a writer living in New York, London, and Gstaad. In addition to his long-running High Life column in The Spectator, Taki writes Under the Black Flag for each number of Chronicles, and publishes Taki’s Magazine, a webzine.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, JakeHolman said:
Under the Black Flag
 
November 2020

Hollywood Remakes the Culture

 
 
Hollywood_Sign_PB050006
 

If you thought “woke” hysteria killed comedy, fear no longer: Hollywood has come to the rescue. The Academy—a misnomer if there ever was one—has decreed that a movie can no longer be eligible for an award unless it meets certain criteria. All “Best Picture” nominees must include storylines about underrepresented groups, and a significant percentage of a film’s lead actors and support staff must be members of said underrepresented groups, namely “people of color,” homosexuals, transsexuals, and the disabled—the latter preferably of mixed race.

The greedy lowlifes who run La-La Land will now make sure filmmakers tick all the boxes when casting a movie. Hollywood has depended on recycling past triumphs since at least the late ’50s. Now, as they prepare to remake Casablanca, imagine the hoops they’ll have to jump through.

Rick would have to be played by a black actor, probably Idris Elba, and Ilsa, let’s say by an Arab lesbian (yet to be discovered). The new script would have Rick stuck in Casablanca after a failed drug deal, stalked by Major Strasser, a drug enforcement agent of Hawaiian background who has a fetish for Nazi uniforms. The only white person in the movie would be the disabled piano player, who tickles the ivories with his toes, having burnt both his hands to a crisp while stoking the embers in his coal-fired boiler.

Victor Laszlo, Ilsa’s hubby, would be a Saudi sensitivity training expert who used to pimp her out to women until his life was transformed by reading the Koran. He and Ilsa began their affair at university in Riyadh, were separated after he was arrested by the religious police, and were reunited in Beirut before ending up in Casablanca. 

Captain Renault would be played by the incarcerated R & B star R. Kelly, furloughed from his present residence in prison for the duration of the shoot. The love of vulnerable, underage girls shared by both the R & B star and the character he would play makes this casting a natural selection that will be very popular with fans.

Can you envision the endless possibilities, dear readers, once the woke brigades get a hold of past Hollywood films? Denzel Washington could be a credible Rhett Butler; Rihanna could play Scarlett. The trouble would start with the characters of Big Sam and Mammy, ditto when remaking Porgy and Bess. Never mind, though, just fill the hospital scene in Atlanta with transgender and nonbinary people shown moaning and groaning while Sherman’s bombs are falling, and the remake will be lauded for righting historical wrongs.

The old Tarzan films would obviously pose a problem. Meghan Markle would make a believable Jane, with Tarzan played by Jamie Foxx. It’s the natives I’m worried about. They will have to be of Scandinavian extraction. Since the movies would be shot in Norway, loincloths would give extras very little protection against frostbite.

The Godfather franchise, rebooted as The Godmother, will pose no such problems. The famous scene where Al Pacino shoots the bad white police captain in the face will be reshot exactly as in the original, with Cardi B blasting away at a Sterling Hayden lookalike. The 1972 racist joke of “Wops versus Cops” will no longer apply, not with the new Cardi Corleone, Lizzo as the Godmother, and a supporting cast of other black female stars burning up the silver screen.

So there you have it, a new, improved, and politically correct movie industry entering the new millennium with a bang. Misandry, Greek for hatred of the male sex, will be the theme behind every blockbuster. Wonder Woman will make mincemeat of Superman, unless in his latest reincarnation he has a sex change. 

The opportunities are endless: Every Western can be reshot with women taking the roles once upon a time hogged by the likes of John Wayne and Randolph Scott. Imagine what they can do with the remake of The Wild Bunch. The Mexican baddies will of course be Nordic types, and the wonderful Bill Holden’s role as an aging antihero will be taken by the aging Meghan Markle once again.

The role reversals now required by Hollywood and the so-called Academy are not as outlandish as they sound. Not when a once-credible newspaper like The New York Times has turned into a leftist propaganda rag promoting the revisionist history that the American Revolution was fought in order to preserve slavery.

Of course, the new, improved Hollywood will also continue to take its cue from the standards set by the massive  Chinese market, where Communist leaders micromanage all life, including the movies.

Freedom of speech is supposed to allow individuals and groups to defend their interests against encroaching authority. The reversal of the ideals of Voltaire practiced by the left and its media allies is nothing less than a coup to seize power over our thought processes, once and for all. Hollywood is just following orders.                             

 
 

Taki Theodoracopulos

Taki Theodoracopulos is a writer living in New York, London, and Gstaad. In addition to his long-running High Life column in The Spectator, Taki writes Under the Black Flag for each number of Chronicles, and publishes Taki’s Magazine, a webzine.

This article is incorrect from the first paragraph, which means the rest of that diatribe can be safely ignored. 

Those conditions for nominations are wrong.  Here it is, straight from the Academy website.

For the 96th Oscars (2024), a film must meet TWO out of FOUR of the following standards to be deemed eligible:

STANDARD A:  ON-SCREEN REPRESENTATION, THEMES AND NARRATIVES
To achieve Standard A, the film must meet ONE of the following criteria:

A1. Lead or significant supporting actors

At least one of the lead actors or significant supporting actors is from an underrepresented racial or ethnic group.
• Asian
• Hispanic/Latinx
• Black/African American
• Indigenous/Native American/Alaskan Native
• Middle Eastern/North African
• Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander
• Other underrepresented race or ethnicity

A2. General ensemble cast

At least 30% of all actors in secondary and more minor roles are from at least two of the following underrepresented groups:
• Women
• Racial or ethnic group
• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing

A3. Main storyline/subject matter

The main storyline(s), theme or narrative of the film is centered on an underrepresented group(s).
• Women
• Racial or ethnic group
• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing


STANDARD B: CREATIVE LEADERSHIP AND PROJECT TEAM
To achieve Standard B, the film must meet ONE of the criteria below:

B1. Creative leadership and department heads

At least two of the following creative leadership positions and department heads—Casting Director, Cinematographer, Composer, Costume Designer, Director, Editor, Hairstylist, Makeup Artist, Producer, Production Designer, Set Decorator, Sound, VFX Supervisor, Writer—are from the following underrepresented groups:
• Women
• Racial or ethnic group
• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing

At least one of those positions must belong to the following underrepresented racial or ethnic group:
• Asian
• Hispanic/Latinx
• Black/African American
• Indigenous/Native American/Alaskan Native
• Middle Eastern/North African
• Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander
• Other underrepresented race or ethnicity

B2. Other key roles

At least six other crew/team and technical positions (excluding Production Assistants) are from an underrepresented racial or ethnic group. These positions include but are not limited to First AD, Gaffer, Script Supervisor, etc.

B3. Overall crew composition
At least 30% of the film’s crew is from the following underrepresented groups:
• Women
• Racial or ethnic group
• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing


STANDARD 😄 INDUSTRY ACCESS AND OPPORTUNITIES
To achieve Standard C, the film must meet BOTH criteria below:

C1. Paid apprenticeship and internship opportunities

The film’s distribution or financing company has paid apprenticeships or internships that are from the following underrepresented groups and satisfy the criteria below:
• Women
• Racial or ethnic group
• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing

The major studios/distributors are required to have substantive, ongoing paid apprenticeships/internships inclusive of underrepresented groups (must also include racial or ethnic groups) in most of the following departments: production/development, physical production, post-production, music, VFX, acquisitions, business affairs, distribution, marketing and publicity.

The mini-major or independent studios/distributors must have a minimum of two apprentices/interns from the above underrepresented groups (at least one from an underrepresented racial or ethnic group) in at least one of the following departments: production/development, physical production, post-production, music, VFX, acquisitions, business affairs, distribution, marketing and publicity.

C2. Training opportunities and skills development (crew)

The film’s production, distribution and/or financing company offers training and/or work opportunities for below-the-line skill development to people from the following underrepresented groups:
• Women
• Racial or ethnic group
• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing
 

STANDARD 😧 AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT
To achieve Standard D, the film must meet the criterion below:

D1. Representation in marketing, publicity, and distribution


The studio and/or film company has multiple in-house senior executives from among the following underrepresented groups (must include individuals from underrepresented racial or ethnic groups) on their marketing, publicity, and/or distribution teams.
• Women
• Racial or ethnic group

  • Asian
  • Hispanic/Latinx
  • Black/African American
  • Indigenous/Native American/Alaskan Native
  • Middle Eastern/North African
  • Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander
  • Other underrepresented race or ethnicity

• LGBTQ+
• People with cognitive or physical disabilities, or who are deaf or hard of hearing

All categories other than Best Picture will be held to their current eligibility requirements.  Films in the specialty feature categories (Animated Feature Film, Documentary Feature, International Feature Film) submitted for Best Picture/General Entry consideration will be addressed separately.

Academy Aperture 2025 is the next phase of the Academy’s equity and inclusion initiative furthering the organization’s ongoing efforts to advance inclusion in the entertainment industry and incr

Link to post
Share on other sites

LewRockwell.com

anti-stateanti-warpro-market

 

George Clooney and the New Woke Imperialism

The actor says Viktor Orban’s Hungary is full of hate. What a load of nonsense.

By Frank Furedi
Spiked

November 25, 2020

Hollywood celebrities are increasingly serving on the frontline of the culture war. They were out in force during the US presidential elections. And they continually issue missives supporting a range of causes, from Black Lives Matter to the campaign to turn Greta Thunberg into a secular saint.

So I was not shocked when, in the course of an online interview with GQ magazine, George Clooney interrupted his discussion of his new film, The Midnight Sky, to talk about the problem of hatred throughout the world. And, in line with the fashionable Hollywood political playbook, Clooney’s condemnation of hate was naturally accompanied by an attack on Hungary.

Projecting the sci-fi vision of The Midnight Sky on to what he clearly sees as real-world dystopias in Hungary and elsewhere, Clooney concluded his commentary on hate by saying: ‘Go to Bolsonaro in Brazil or Orban in Hungary.’

There is no evidence that Clooney has actually experienced any hate in Brazil or Hungary. It would be great if Clooney followed his advice of ‘go to Hungary’, because he might then decide to alter his script of hate.

As with the imperialist storytellers of the 19th century, Clooney’s view of the exotic Other is really a sublimated expression of the anxieties circulating in his own world. If you want to experience outbursts of hate, you could do worse than go to Clooney’s native land. Just watch the videos of Black Lives Matter protesters yelling at diners in a restaurant in Washington, DC. Their language of hatred is totally unrestrained, as is their intimidating body language. Similar scenes have tragically erupted in many parts of the US.

So I say to George: ‘Go to America.’ Go there and learn about the hate that people are experiencing.

As it happens, George has not been anywhere for quite some time. As a fully signed-up member of the global cultural elite, he does not really go to normal places, where normal human beings live and work. Just look at his schedule as he jets from one villa to another, only occasionally punctuating his pursuits by going to Davos or some other global forum where he can encounter friends and colleagues – who also don’t really go anywhere.

Unlike George, I do go to Hungary. On a bad day I sometimes encounter tense individuals, who lash out at one another. In this sense Hungary is no different to any other European society. But hate? In Hungary you will not find the kind of personalised venomous attacks on individuals that have become the hallmark of the weaponisation of identity politics in the US.

And yet, despite the relatively relaxed atmosphere that prevails in a city like Budapest, I expect to see a new wave of celebrities mobilising their reputations to assist with the anti-Hungary crusade.

Read the Whole Article

Link to post
Share on other sites
Chronicles Magazine of American Culture
 
Blog
 
November 30, 2020

Abolishing Freedom Under the Guise of 'Woke' Hollywood

 

I recently wrote about one of my favorite movies – “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”­ – noting that its message seems more relevant to our times than when it was first released. After penning that article, I pulled the movie out for a re-watch and found that yes, “Mr. Smith” rings even more true for our time than I remembered.

When the movie was over, one of my family members gave a little laugh and asked, “Can you imagine Hollywood doing a remake of that movie?”

That rhetorical question underscored the idea that anything Hollywood touches these days turns into some type of “woke” monstrosity, well diversified and obscuring the original meaning of the story. Yet perhaps this was the plan all along: to confuse and control our minds to such an extent that even our entertainment sends subliminal messaging about the political course of our daily lives.

Taki Theodoracopulos examines this idea in the November issue of Chronicles Magazinetraveling down woke Hollywood laneimagining what some of these classic movies would look like if remade today. It isn’t pretty.

Meghan Markle, he suggests, would star as Jane in a new version of Tarzan, in which the natives would be played by those of Scandinavian ancestry. Male heroes such as Superman will be eviscerated by female leads such as Wonder Woman. The Casablanca remake cast, writes Theodoracopulos, would feature an Arab lesbian as Ilsa, while her husband “would be a Saudi sensitivity training expert who used to pimp her out to women until his life was transformed by reading the Koran.”

This “new, improved Hollywood,” he writes, “will also continue to take its cue from the standards set by the massive Chinese market, where Communist leaders micromanage all life, including the movies.”

All of this sounds quite plausible knowing Hollywood’s fixation on politically correct plots and actors. Yet this fixation on identity politics seems to hide a deeper problem in today’s movies. They sweep solid plotlines and positive, life-affirming messages aside.

Take Casablanca, for instance. Although known mainly as a love story, the tale is set in the midst of the upheaval of World War II. Its characters are refugees from all over Europe, seeking to escape the totalitarian tidal wave of Nazi Germany. They do everything they can to reach the freedom of America, but often fall short.

Many of the actors in Casablanca were real refugees who had themselves fled their homes in occupied territory, writes Aljean Harmetz in The Making of Casablanca: Bogart, Bergman, and World War II. This fact makes the scene in which German singing is drowned out by a rousing rendition of “La Marseillaise” so stirring. The refugees-turned-actors knew full well what it was to lose their freedom. In both real life and in the film, they felt the heavy hand of the Third Reich. Singing was one way they could express their resistance and fight back, showing where their hearts truly were. This is an American tradition, too. For the refugees in the film, such resistance was met with punishment, most notably, the closing of Rick’s Café.

Sadly, this longing for freedom, engagement in subtle resistances, and oppression by authorities are all things today’s Americans are experiencing with increasing regularity. They have had businesses closed, holidays cancelled, and gatherings outlawed, with the threat of restrictions only increasing. Other nations have experienced similar oppressions and are fighting back with success; Americans seem to still be deliberating whether or not they want to risk giving up their security to fight for their liberty.

Perhaps we can’t blame them. Gone are the days when the message of freedom was repeated and reaffirmed in America’s entertainment products. The security of political correctness and diversity have taken its place.

Concluding his piece on woke Hollywood remakes, Theodoracopulos notes,

Freedom of speech is supposed to allow individuals and groups to defend their interests against encroaching authority. The reversal of the ideals of Voltaire practiced by the left and its media allies is nothing less than a coup to seize power over our thought processes, once and for all. Hollywood is just following orders.

Will we fall in line and follow those same orders? Or will we, like the Casablanca refugees, stand up and fight for our freedom?

 
 

Annie Holmquist

 

Annie Holmquist is the editor of Intellectual Takeout. When not writing or editing, she enjoys reading, gardening, and time with family and friends.

Link to post
Share on other sites

mail?url=https%3A%2F%2Fthefederalist.imgus11.com%2Fpublic%2F%2Fcbc9808fc4de55c1f4d8ee7abac91cdf.png%3Fr%3D1099728455&t=1607003902&ymreqid=aa5384af-12b9-91d4-1c43-f4000101ca00&sig=hxIJ_FGzLj8dmERDsyHQIw--~D

MOVIES
‘Hillbilly Elegy’ Didn’t Need Politics To Tell A Heart-Wrenching Story
If a movie can make people less judgmental of others based on politics, that’s progress, isn’t it?

 

Perhaps the reason critics so often get under our skin is that they’re not always wrong. In the case of “Hillbilly Elegy,” the Ron Howard-directed Netflix feature film based on the bestselling 2016 memoir of the same name, a recurring criticism is that the book’s sociopolitical commentary was all but excised from the movie.

This is a fair point, since “Hillbilly Elegy” isn’t exactly a rags-to-riches, pull-yourself-up-by-your-bootstraps tale of inspiration. Instead, it’s a harrowing, true-life, insider’s look at how Appalachian America has entered a tailspin of self-destruction from which it seemingly cannot escape.

The story’s central figure, J.D. Vance, is one of the fortunate few to have found a way to break the cycle, but he still finds his cultural and familial legacy is something that, for better or worse, will always stay with him.

‘Hillbilly Elegy’ Tells a Tragic Human Story

The film adaptation certainly omits the broader commentary of the book, which means those who have read it might be disappointed or find the movie something of a different story. It becomes clear, however, that the movie wasn’t necessarily made for those who read the book. Just as a young Vance speaks of marijuana in the film, so this on-screen adaptation is a “gateway drug” — a way for audiences to become introduced to Vance and his story and to cultivate an interest in learning more about its central sociopolitical themes.

In fact, to criticize the film for omitting politics and hot-button issues is ironic, particularly for conservatives. After all, what we often hear from the right is that Hollywood, or near everything, has now become politicized to the left’s satisfaction.

It’s thereby refreshing to watch a movie with such strong sociopolitical undertones so effectively sidestep these tough questions, saving them for another day. Nor did we get a politically correct adaptation, rewritten to conform to the sensitivities of the self-described “open-minded” elite. Instead, what we have is a tragic human story, intended for audiences to empathize with, if not relate to, on a gut level.

Read more >> https://thefederalist.com/2020/12/03/hillbilly-elegy-didnt-need-politics-to-tell-a-heart-wrenching-story/

My mother when she was a little girl rode with my Uncle who was a moonshiner in the north mountains of Georgia ... I know a little bit about Appalachia ... a past and culture I fully embrace ...

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
Chronicles Magazine of American Culture
 
Blog
 
December 28, 2020

Charlton Heston’s Prophetic Words on Political Correctness

 
 
732f10cbefd6448fad4e0436d98af1661

Combine Moses and a Harvard discourse on cancel culture and one encounters a perfect storm for prophetic words.

That’s exactly what happened on Feb. 16, 1999, when Charlton Heston, movie star and president of the National Rifle Association, addressed a standing-room-only crowd at Harvard Law School. The film actor who played Moses and Ben Hur spoke to the students and faculty about American rights, particularly free speech, and the vital importance of speaking up for liberty.         

Today the “woke” and “cancel culture” crew of our major universities would likely have rioted and driven Heston from the stage and the campus. Yet his remarks act as both a warning to all Americans and as a poignant reminder of what we have lost in so short a time.     

Referencing Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, Heston declared, “I believe that we are again engaged in a great civil war, a cultural war that’s about to hijack your birthright to think and say what lives in your heart.”        

He then quotes from Martin Gross’s book, The End of Sanity, noting that:

“[B]latantly irrational behavior is rapidly being established as the norm in almost every area of human endeavor. There seem to be new customs, new rules, new anti-intellectual theories regularly twisted on us—foisted on us from every direction. Underneath, the nation is roiling. Americans know something without a name is undermining the country, turning the mind mushy when it comes to separating truth from falsehood and right from wrong. And they don't like it.”

Throughout his speech, Heston cites a score of specific examples of political correctness at work on campuses and in the culture at large, stories that read like today’s headlines: racially segregated dorms on campuses, authoritarian protocols for dating, research suppressed because it disproved pet theories, and more.

He then speaks boldly and directly to his young audience: “You are the best and the brightest. You, here in this fertile cradle of American academia, here in the castle of learning on the Charles River. You are the cream.”

Yet despite the brightness of his audience, Heston recognized a big problem:

“But I submit that you and your counterparts across the land are the most socially conformed and politically silenced generation since Concord Bridge. And as long as you validate that and abide it, you are, by your grandfathers' standards, cowards.” 

“But, what can you do?” Heston continues. “How can anyone prevail against such pervasive social subjugation?”

The answer? Stand your ground, something Heston claims he learned while standing with Dr. Martin Luther King and those who protested with him: “You simply disobey. Peaceably, yes. Respectfully, of course. Nonviolently, absolutely. But when told how to think or what to say or how to behave, we don't. We disobey the social protocol that stifles and stigmatizes personal freedom.”

He then provides some specific means of resistance:

“When a mugger sues his elderly victim for defending herself, jam the switchboard of the district attorney's office. When your university is pressured—your university—is pressured to lower standards until 80% of the students graduate with honors, choke the halls of the Board of Regents. When an 8-year-old boy pecks a girl's cheek on the playground and then gets hauled into court for sexual harassment, march on that school and block its doorways. When someone you elected is seduced by political power and betrays you—petition them, oust them, banish them. When Time magazine's cover portrays millennium nuts as deranged, crazy Christians holding a cross as it did last month, boycott their magazine and the products it advertises.

The reason why Americans should offer this resistance, Heston explains, is “so that this nation may long endure.” Therefore, he urges his listeners “to follow in the hallowed footsteps of the great disobediences of history that freed exiles, founded religions, defeated tyrants, and yes, in the hands of an aroused rabble in arms and a few great men, by God's grace, built this country.”

Regarding political correctness and the future, Heston tells his audience, “Among other things, it means that telling us what to think has evolved into telling us what to say, so telling us what to do can't be far behind.”           

We are living that future right now. After decades of being told what to think and say, we have come to the point where many of our politicians, bureaucrats, academics, and radicals are telling us what to do. Often they don’t even bother to explain their directives. Here in Virginia, for example, Governor Ralph Northam ordered a statewide curfew from midnight until 5 a.m. as a preventative measure against coronavirus. How does this arbitrary clampdown stop the spread of a virus? Our state government also commands us to wear masks even while outdoors.

Wherever we encounter such tyranny, petty or grandiose, we must, like Charlton Heston, resist. Complaining to like-minded friends about fraud in the presidential elections, criticizing our governor in our homes but with no public protest: these may relieve some of our anxiety, but they do nothing to change our world for the better.

Our silence and obedience makes us our own oppressors. It’s time to listen to Mr. Heston.

 
 

Jeff Minick

 

Jeff Minick lives in Front Royal, Virginia, and may be found online at jeffminick.com. He is the author of two novels, Amanda Bell and Dust on Their Wings, and two works of non-fiction, Learning as I Go and Movies Make the Man.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...