Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

April Schedule is Up! Jane Russell SOTM


Recommended Posts

Thoughts

How many accounts will be created on the first to complain about a 24-hour run of subtitled movies?

"NY in the 70s" is a nice theme. Those films will also upset some hardline-classic-era-only people. Fingers is an interesting movie.

TCM Underground has Cover Me Babe (1970), which is rarely seen. Black Mama, White Mama (1972) on the 10th is worth checking out.

TCM Imports is showing the Lone Wolf and Club movies. I love them all. Fireworks aka Hana-Bi (1997) is on the 26th - highly recommended yakuza tale.

The 7th has a bunch of good B genre flicks, including Attack of the 50 Foot Woman and The Killer Shrews.

The Essentials appears to be gone.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Three weeks of Lone Wolf/Cub movies?

At least we get Paper Moon as part of the Bogdanovitch quasi-spotlight.  I'm surprised they didn't get At Long Last Love just to be complete.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a great choice (considering how many other stars are still waiting for their first try), but better than Joe E. Brown! Feel like TCM's programming has been going downhill for some time now. I hardly watch the station (outside of Noir Alley and special programming) anymore.

Link to post
Share on other sites

TCM Spotlight: Peter Bogdanovich.  I've really enjoyed the films of his that I've seen.  I really hope that Bogdanovich will be sitting down with Ben Mankiewicz (or whomever) to discuss his work.  It seems that two of his films are being featured every Saturday, preceding Noir Alley.

I like the choice of Jane Russell as SOTM.  She's appeared in a lot of interesting films. 

4/2

The New York in the 70s spotlight: Panic in Needle Park, The Taking of Pelham One Two Three, Klute

I've found that I really enjoy the gritty 70s films.

4/7 1948 Noir Spotlight. I'm especially interested in Cry of the City, He Walked by Night, and The Naked City.

4/8 Harry Belafonte spotlight.  I love Harry Belafonte.  I really hope he is also sitting down with Ben Mankiewicz (or whomever) to discuss the films being shown.

4/9 A whole day of pre-code. 

4/10 The Blue Bird. I've never seen Shirley Temple's answer to The Wizard of Oz

4/12 The Jazz Singer.  I've never seen the first talkie.

4/14 The Man Who Never Was, featuring Clifton Webb and Gloria Grahame! This film sounds interesting.

4/22 Wind Across the Everglades.  Burl Ives and Gypsy Rose Lee and birds? This seems like a movie I need to see.

4/24 There's Always Tomorrow with Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray.  I've been wanting to see this film again.

4/26 Tokyo Joe. A Humphrey Bogart movie I've never heard of!

4/30 An Eve Arden spotlight!

Overall, I think this is a great schedule.  As I get closer to April, I'm sure I'll find more things to record. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Not a great choice (considering how many other stars are still waiting for their first try), but better than Joe E. Brown! Feel like TCM's programming has been going downhill for some time now. I hardly watch the station (outside of Noir Alley and special programming) anymore.

I wonder if Jane Russell was picked just so they could show off the new HD print of Underwater......

Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, skimpole said:

Three weeks of Lone Wolf/Cub movies?

At least we get Paper Moon as part of the Bogdanovitch quasi-spotlight.  I'm surprised they didn't get At Long Last Love just to be complete.

Deleted since I confused the Warren William Lone Wolf serial with these Japaneses movies.      (and my mom was born in Tokyo,,,,    please don't tell her!). 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

I wonder if Jane Russell was picked just so they could show off the new HD print of Underwater......

Is that a similar experience to The Deep?    😉

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

What do you mean by 3 weeks of Lone Wolf/Cub movies?    3 weeks?

Anyhow I like the Lone Wolf serial.   Warren William and Eric Blore and fine in this crime \ comedy serial.

They also feature some young Columbia talent like Ida Lupino and Rita Hayworth,  as well as others.

Many people were asking that William be STOM and at least we get to see film from Columbia studios;   a studio that TCM doesn't feature as much as their big-3.

They are showing the six Lone Wolf and Cub films (1972-1974), two a night, for 3 consecutive weeks on TCM Imports.

They are Japanese samurai movies, about a wanted samurai (the shogun's former executioner) and his infant son, wandering the countryside, inevitably coming into bloody conflict with a bunch of miscreants. No relation to the American Lone Wolf mystery series.

lonewolf1-793x527.jpg

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Premieres:

Fingers (1978)

Report to the Commissioner (1975)

Cover me Babe (1978)

Lone Wolf and Cub: Sword of Vengeance (1972)

Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart at the River Styx (1972)

Cry of the City (1948)

Black Mama White Mama (1972)

Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart to Hades (1972)

Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart in Peril (1972)

The man Who Never Was (1956)

Saint Jack (1979)

Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart in the land of Demons (1973)

Lone Wolf and Cub: White Heaven in Hell (1974)

Texasville (1990)

Fireworks (1997)

youth of the Beast (1963)

Foxfire (1955)

Across 110th Street (1972)

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

I wonder if Jane Russell was picked just so they could show off the new HD print of Underwater......

LOL!

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

They are showing the six Lone Wolf and Cub films (1972-1974), two a night, for 3 consecutive weeks on TCM Imports.

They are Japanese samurai movies, about a wanted samurai (the shogun's former executioner) and his infant son, wandering the countryside, inevitably coming into bloody conflict with a bunch of miscreants. No relation to the American Lone Wolf mystery series.

 

Thanks for that info.    I'll have to let my mom know.      Maybe I'll even go to her house to watch a few for some mother \ son bonding.

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Premieres:

Report to the Commissioner (1975)

youth of the Beast (1963)

Across 110th Street (1972)

I liked those three as well, although the best part of Across 110th Street is the theme song.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Also little sidenote about two of the premieres:

Report to the Commissioner was the film debut for Richard Gere.

Texasville, though hardly a critical or financial success, was the sequel to The Last Picture Show with most of the original cast returning. Quiet musing: sequels to movies based on Larry McMurtry books don't seem to go over well. The Evening Star, critically mauled in late 1996 (and despite that, Marion Ross was [deservedly] up for a Golden Globe for it), was the sequel to Terms of Endearment.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Not certain, but maybe likely judging from the blu-ray cover , which seems to really emphasize that certain something about Jane......

1000753650_1de7821d-79e7-43df-ab27-85f3a

Nice... highlighting.

This movie cover though makes me want to see the film. Lol. 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

I know The French line was in 3d, that i know, because many were outraged at that. I'm not certain on Underwater, and it is indeed on the schedule, so HD print ahoy!

Oh, that's right. Maybe I'm confusing the two. Jane Russell in 3-D! She'll poke both your eyes out!

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Hibi said:

Oh, that's right. Maybe I'm confusing the two. Jane Russell in 3-D! She'll poke both of your eyes out!

God forbid she ever don a torpedo bra! You'd have to put blinkers on her!

  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to segue the conversation into a discussion about women's bosoms, but typically women in the classic era aren't very buxom.  The only two that immediately come to mind (aside from Russell) are Janet Leigh and Bette Davis.  But I think Russell has them both beat... by a cup at least.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, speedracer5 said:

Not to segue the conversation into a discussion about women's bosoms, but typically women in the classic era aren't very buxom.  The only two that immediately come to mind (aside from Russell) are Janet Leigh and Bette Davis.  But I think Russell has them both beat... by a cup at least.

I'm still reminded by that scene in 2004's The Aviator where Howard Hughes appears before the Production Code office regarding Russell's buxomness in The Outlaw by showing them enlarged pictured of low cut numbers on actresses in films passed without a hitch. I have a feeling that if the actresses in question were still alive when the movie was made, they would not have been happy campers.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

4/12 The Jazz Singer.  I've never seen the first talkie.

The Jazz Singer is not exactly the first talkie, although its success did effectively bring an end to the silent era and kick off the talkie "fad."   It's really a silent film with synchronized-sound musical numbers.  I believe Al Jolson only has one line of spoken dialogue that is audible, the rest appears in intertitles.  The first true all-talking picture, Lights of New York (1928), is airing on March 7 at 8:29 am Eastern, so set your recorder if you're interested.  By all accounts it's pretty terrible!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

I'm still reminded by that scene in 2004's The Aviator where Howard Hughes appears before the Production Code office regarding Russell's buxomness in The Outlaw by showing them enlarged pictured of low cut numbers on actresses in films passed without a hitch. I have a feeling that if the actresses in question were still alive when the movie was made, they would not have been happy campers.

Don't forget that Lana Turner was known as the Sweater Girl and due to the scene below the Production Code cracked down and when Bette was filming In This Our Life,  they had to order new outfits because they had to dump all the sweaters Bette was planning to wear.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Feego said:

The Jazz Singer is not exactly the first talkie, although its success did effectively bring an end to the silent era and kick off the talkie "fad."   It's really a silent film with synchronized-sound musical numbers.  I believe Al Jolson only has one line of spoken dialogue that is audible, the rest appears in intertitles.  The first true all-talking picture, Lights of New York (1928), is airing on March 7 at 8:29 am Eastern, so set your recorder if you're interested.  By all accounts it's pretty terrible!

Thanks for the info! I shall watch both films!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...