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Wet Streets and sidewalks


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24 minutes ago, Terrence1 said:

I have noticed this also, even in films other than noir.  I'm wondering if part of the motivation is that streets seem to be more photogenic when wet.

Much of noir is about atmosphere.   Wet street create contrasts,  reflections and other visual effects and these are useful with black and white photography.

 

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6 hours ago, Terrence1 said:

I have noticed this also, even in films other than noir.  I'm wondering if part of the motivation is that streets seem to be more photogenic when wet.

I think so too. It becomes a cliche almost.

Though I have more of a 'problem' with films of the past ten years doing all that warm lighting, as if every outdoor scene takes place at 4 p.m. I think this is done to make the actors look their best on screen, especially older actors who need the softer lighting. But I prefer scenes that take place in cold environments, and it's one reason why I love Robert Wise's ODDS AGAINST TOMORROW (1959) so much, because everything looks cold, crisp and as if it's shot in the morning or at dusk.

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