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Coronavirus Epidemic


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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

Now let me get this straight. You're touting about all these research scientists trying to find a vaccine or some kind of a drug remedy for the coronavirus. Now these research scientists and doctors are the same intellectual breed of people who have told us about climate change.

Yet you're willing to believe one group of scientists but not another group of scientists, when all scientists follow the same principles and evidence-based scientific method that dates from the 17th century.

Science is science and you can't decide that you want to believe it just because it's something that suits your right-wing political narrative--

Your terminology, certainly not mine.

Yet at the same time you can't believe another group of scientists who are just as reputable and from the same educational institutions and methods because it doesn't fit your right-wing political narrative.

Spock would say that's just not logical.

Talk about mixing apples and oranges, what in the  hell does global warming have to do with medicine outside of skin cancer?

Man is trying to measure climate in way too short of a time scale.  Only been recording such since the 19th century.  THOSE scientist have to follow in lockstep or lose recognition, funding, etc. As Judge Milian is fond of saying, ....I wouldn't believe you if your tongue came notarized!

By the way, what has ever happened to the subject?  Just ask anyone out of work, in quarantine do they care about global warming?  You will be shown out the door so fast, will need to return for your shoes!

It was far warmer during the Medieval Warm Period, Greenland looked like Kansas during the summer!

If you think man is in control, let one large volcano erupt!

 

The doctors are not certain how effective blood transfusions will be.  Must try different approaches to fighting the virus.  There will be NO new drugs in the near future (time to develop / test)  and vaccines are a year off.

You think science will come to the rescue at a snap of a finger.  Spoiled rotten are Americans wanting everything NOW!

 

You should know by now I will NEVER EVER accept this global warming farce so lets stop debating it, you are wasting your time!

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On 3/26/2020 at 11:40 PM, Princess of Tap said:

 

Thursday, March 26th 2020

1,300-- Coronavirus deaths in the United States

85,594-- Confirmed Coronavirus cases in the United States

 

23 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

 

 

Friday, March 27th 2020

1,701-- Coronavirus deaths in the United States

104,205-- Confirmed Coronavirus cases in the United States

 

54 minutes ago, jakeem said:

Saturday, March 28th 2020

2,227-- Coronavirus deaths in the United States 

123,750-- Confirmed Coronavirus cases in the United States

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Another example why false or unproven rumors  "information" needs to be squashed.

A viral text warns taking Advil could make COVID-19 symptoms worse, but experts say it’s unfounded

https://www.theverge.com/2020/3/27/21197188/advil-coronavirus-symptoms-covid-19-text-misinformation-twitter

 

AARP  No Medical Evidence That Taking Ibuprofen Makes Coronavirus Worse

https://www.aarp.org/health/drugs-supplements/info-2020/ibuprofen-coronavirus.html

853567306.jpg.0.jpg

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9 minutes ago, hamradio said:

Another example why false or unproven rumors  "information" needs to be squashed.

A viral text warns taking Advil could make COVID-19 symptoms worse, but experts say it’s unfounded

https://www.theverge.com/2020/3/27/21197188/advil-coronavirus-symptoms-covid-19-text-misinformation-twitter

 

AARP  No Medical Evidence That Taking Ibuprofen Makes Coronavirus Worse

https://www.aarp.org/health/drugs-supplements/info-2020/ibuprofen-coronavirus.html

853567306.jpg.0.jpg

Who believes that Twitter is a viable news source?

I'm sure I heard this rumor debunked clearly last week on Lester Holt NBC Nightly News.

If you take your news off Twitter you probably get what you deserve. LOL

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19 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Who believes that Twitter is a viable news source?

I'm sure I heard this rumor debunked clearly last week on Lester Holt NBC Nightly News.

If you take your news off Twitter you probably get what you deserve. LOL

Gossip can spread like wildfire regardless where it originated from.

Just Google Advil Coronavirus and see  how many hits you get.  Doubt everyone watch  Lester Holt.

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1 hour ago, hamradio said:

Gossip can spread like wildfire regardless where it originated from.

Just Google Advil Coronavirus and see  how many hits you get.  Doubt everyone watch  Lester Holt.

I'm sorry to say that a person has to have a certain amount of education and critical reasoning to ascertain what a legitimate news source is.

The popularity of Fox News demonstrates that there are quite a few people in this country who do not have enough education or critical reasoning to evaluate what a legitimate news source is.

But as Jimmy Carter used to say, life's not fair.

 

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10 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

I'm sorry to say that a person has to have a certain amount of education and critical reasoning to ascertain what a legitimate news source is.

The popularity of Fox News demonstrates that there are quite a few people in this country who do not have enough education or critical reasoning to evaluate what a legitimate news source is.

But as Jimmy Carter used to say, life's not fair.

 

I was taught that as a kid, still remember when the teacher kept everybody an hour after normal school hours because 1 kid done something bad.   Didn't understood it at the time (so-o-o unfair) but that was the lesson.....the actions of one or a few can effect everyone (like car insurance)

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Just now, hamradio said:

I was taught that as a kid, still remember when the teacher kept everybody an hour after normal school hours because 1 kid done something bad.   Didn't understood it at the time (so-o-o unfair) but that was the lesson.

They did that a lot in my third grade. One kid couldn't stop talking and we all had to stay after school.

But that did teach me to understand the meaning of the phrase peer pressure. LOL

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https://www.rt.com/op-ed/481831-coronavirus-kill-bill-capitalism-communism/

The ongoing spread of the coronavirus epidemic has also triggered vast epidemics of ideological viruses which were laying dormant in our societies: fake news, paranoiac conspiracy theories, explosions of racism.

The well-grounded medical need for quarantines found an echo in the ideological pressure to establish clear borders and to quarantine enemies that pose a threat to our identity.

But maybe another – and much more beneficial – ideological virus will spread and hopefully infect us: the virus of thinking about an alternate society, a society beyond nation-state, a society that actualizes itself in the forms of global solidarity and cooperation. 

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15 hours ago, Arturo said:

That’s because he plans to funnel some/much of that money to his own businesses, whether here or offshore.  He will not allow any oversight for any of his shady dealings!

Wilbur Ross and Steve Mnuchin made huge fortune in the 2008 financial crisis.  They were given distressed banks with no downside risk.  The government funnelled money into them and the pair foreclosed on over 100,000 homes reaping the profits.  These are the kind of scoundrels that Donald Trump handpicks to run America.

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http://positionswebsite.org/moni-ovadia-the-working-class-in-the-age-of-coronavirus/

I’ve devoted my life to striving for the highest possible level of intellectual honesty and coherence and rebelling against injustices and abuses. I have always taken the side of the exploited, the harassed, the victims of discrimination, the last ones, and I have fought with all my strength against the inequalities generated by the logic of privilege, which is the source of all depravation and crime, even in a society that deems itself “civil.”

Even in those self-styled “democratic” societies, if the principle of equality does not rule, we have neither democracy nor liberty. These days, large swaths of the world are afflicted by the coronavirus pandemic, and our country is suffering with particular intensity. Like millions of other Italians, I am self-quarantining at home; I keep a safe distance even from my family; I don’t go out; I obey the rules issued by the government, even if I am “anti-government” by vocation (including being against those governments for which I voted). I practice the principle of maximum responsibility.

It is a paradoxical but life-saving attitude for those of us in the profession of culture and thought. Under such dramatic conditions, as a citizen, I decided to place my trust in the government of Prime Minister Conte, believing in the equity of the adopted measures. Then I discovered that the executive decree, point 6, comma d (concerning productive activities), says: “[workers] must follow anti-contagion safety protocols, and where it is not possible to keep the recommended 1-meter inter-personal distance, they should adopt instruments of individual protection.”

Which instruments? The masks that are nowhere to be found? Or that are sold at black market prices by criminals who speculate on panic? And this came after we were all told that the function of the mask was not to protect ourselves from contagion but to protect those who work in close quarters with infected people?

Why are workers left unprotected or under-protected? Why is the right of protection from contagion not automatically extended to workers? Why are protests, strikes, and tough statements from the unions required to put this issue on the agenda?

It is because the working class is treated as a pariah caste. Now that logistic has become crucially important, even the ultra-proletarianized workers of this sector, who are subject to indecent rhythms and conditions, are part of the class which is the backbone of the productive economy.

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From Pun Ngai-

http://positionswebsite.org/pun-ngai-the-epidemic-exposes-the-injustice-of-chinas-judicial-system/

This was originally published  in Chinese on February 26 https://news.mingpao.com/ins/文摘/article/20200226/s00022/1582626076007/疫情暴露中國司法制度不公(文-潘毅)

The coronavirus is now spreading throughout the world.  From the January 20 television interview with Zhong Nanshan, when human-to-human transmission was first confirmed, to most recently, there have been about 80,000 diagnoses in China, about 3000 of which are medical personnel. We have known for a long time that this is not simply a natural disaster.  A long history of top-down control of public opinion has formed a regime that cares nothing for the citizens’ right to know, that has concealed the nature of the epidemic, that has admonished “whistle blowers”, and that has led to the quarantining of infected people unaware of their conditions. Medical personnel, who most needed protection, did not get it in time.  This regime has contributed to an epidemic that has gotten out of control, with locked down cities, villages, and residential districts, a stagnant economy, and trapped existences for its people.  The damages and losses from this epidemic are already incalculable. And all of this, it must be said, is not only a natural disaster; this is also a human disaster.

On February 21, the nation was rocked by startling news:  in five prisons in three provinces, there were 505 confirmed  diagnoses.  Since the epidemic began, the central government had ordered that there was to be no concealment or falsification of reports.  Nevertheless, this is a system that has long operated with minimal transparency, and no respect for the public’s right to know. These are not new conditions, but are deeply rooted in the system’s logic of control.  What has come into clear view in this epidemic is really just a more spectacular manifestation of the long-term erosion of popular rights, as in the authorities’ treatment of “whistle-blowers” and rights advocates.  This treatment has included censure, arrest, house arrest, and imprisonment.  All of this is intrinsic to the judicial system, contributing to the tremendous mistrust that the people of Hong Kong have for China’s attempts to revise Hong Kong law, and a significant motivating force behind the popular movements since the middle of last year.

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Let’s ‘Kick Coronavirus’s ****’

In this nightmarish moment, we’re feeling warm and fuzzy about the cold and calculating Andrew Cuomo.

By Maureen Dowd 

WASHINGTON — It’s no wonder that watching Andrew Cuomo’s daily briefings can make some people crave Chianti and meatballs.

Besides coolly explaining the facts in this terrifying and stultifying plague season, the governor of New York evokes the feeling of a big Italian family dinner table.

And that is the intended effect.

“Call it psychological,” Governor Cuomo, phoning from Albany, tells me. “Call it feelings. Call it emotions. But this is as much a social crisis as a health crisis.”

Gov. Andrew Cuomo at a coronavirus briefing in Albany on Thursday. Gov. Andrew Cuomo at a coronavirus briefing in Albany on Thursday.Credit...Gabby Jones for The New York Times

Often in the past, when people called Cuomo patriarchal, it was not meant as a compliment. It was a way to describe his maniacally controlling behavior, his dark zeal to muscle past people and obstacles to get his way. The Times’s Adam Nagourney dubbed him the “human bulldozer,” and a former adviser once put it this way: “The governor thinks he’s a hammer. So everyone looks like a nail.” But now, the darker the zeal, the better, if it secures you a mask or ventilator. Given the White House’s deathly delays and the president’s childish rants, America is yearning for a trustworthy parental figure — and a hammer.

The warm, fuzzy feeling for the cold, calculating pol that developed among many Democrats in the past week was summed up by Bill Maher, who told me: “I see Cuomo as the Democratic nominee this year. If we could switch Biden out for him, that’s the winner.” He added, “He’s unlikable, which I really like.”

Progressives still have problems with Cuomo’s stances on Medicaid and the criminal justice system. And some people thought that he waited too long to totally button up New York, although the governor maintains that his systematic rolling closure was designed to prevent panic in the streets.

But even Jezebel blew him a kiss with a post by Rebecca Fishbein headlined, “Help, I Think I’m in Love With Andrew Cuomo???,” chronicling how, solo in her Brooklyn apartment, she has become addicted to Cuomo’s briefings and morphed from intense distaste for him to admiration for his “measured bullying.”

The governor actually called her to check in. On his own, after his 2005 divorce from Kerry Kennedy and his split last year from the TV chef and author Sandra Lee, he’d been thinking about the isolation of singles.

“You know, it was sad, the piece,” he tells me. “Being alone in your apartment for virtually 24 hours a day for days and days in this fearful situation and there’s no one to lay on the couch with and watch TV with, and no one to hold. That’s terrible.”

To the surprise of many who did not associate the name “Andrew Cuomo” with the word “empathy,” the governor has become a sort of national shrink, talking us through our fear, our loss and our growing stir-craziness.

“This is going be a long day, and it’s going to be a hard day, and it’s going to be an ugly day, and it’s going to be a sad day,” he told officers from the New York National Guard on Friday, charging them to fight this “invisible” and “insidious” beast and “kick coronavirus’s ****.”

Because New York is at the epicenter of the epidemic in the United States, with 519 deaths and 44,635 confirmed cases, as of noon Friday, Americans have their eyes on the state. Cuomo knows this. “New York is the canary in the coal mine,” he said during one of his passionate televised pleas for the president to provide more ventilators.

It is more than passing strange that in this horror-movie moment, with 13 people dying on Tuesday at Elmhurst Hospital in Queens and a refrigerated truck parked outside to collect the bodies, the nation’s two most prominent leaders are both Queens scions. Both men grew up in the shadows of their fathers, the hard-working sons of European immigrants.

The Trump family is a model of bad nepotism — noblesse oblige in reverse. Such is their reputation as scammers that congressional Democrats felt the need to put a provision in the coronavirus rescue bill to try to prevent Trump-and-Kushner Inc. from carving out a treat of their own.

Mr. Cuomo in 1988. He started a nonprofit agency that promoted housing for the homeless in the 1980s.

Mr. Cuomo in 1988. He started a nonprofit agency that promoted housing for the homeless in the 1980s.Credit...Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times

Cuomo has brought two of his adult daughters onstage with him at briefings. He warned the 22-year-old Michaela to forsake parties celebrating her graduation — in absentia — from Brown. “Risk, reward,” he lectured her in front of millions.

And Cuomo gave his 25-year-old daughter Cara a dollar-a-year job on the virus task force, echoing the time his father gave him a dollar-a-year job as an adviser when he was about her age.

His brother, Chris, hosts a CNN show. The 62-year-old governor goes on it to bicker and banter with his 49-year-old baby brother about everything from the women swooning over Andrew’s machismo style on Twitter — “You know that what people are saying about how you look really can’t be accurate,” Chris teased — to their relative prowess at basketball.

In his briefings, Andrew Cuomo talks about how cabin fever is causing him to get annoyed with his dog, a Northern Inuit named Captain. He talks about stopping his sisters from bringing their kids to see his 88-year-old mother, Matilda, who is “pure sugar” but vulnerable to the virus. He says his mother was a little annoyed when he named a social distancing guideline for the most vulnerable “Matilda’s Law” in her honor.

His mother, Matilda Cuomo, gave him a kiss after he took his third oath of office as governor in January 2019.
His mother, Matilda Cuomo, gave him a kiss after he took his third oath of office as governor in January 2019.Credit...Richard Drew/Associated Press

After Dan Patrick, the lieutenant governor of Texas, suggested that older Americans might be willing to sacrifice themselves for the good of their grandchildren’s economy and President Trump buoyantly called for America to reopen as soon as Easter, Cuomo said flatly, “My mother’s not expendable.” He also tweeted: “You cannot put a value on human life. You do the right thing. That’s what Pop taught us.”

At Wednesday’s briefing, he displayed a picture of Mario Cuomo, who died in 2015, amid all the graphs on infections.

“He’s not here anymore for you,” he said, but “He’s still here for me.”

He offered a quote from his dad about what government should be: “The idea of family, mutuality, the sharing of benefits and burdens for the good of all, feeling one another’s pain, sharing one another’s blessings — reasonably, honestly, fairly, without respect to race or sex or geography or political affiliation.”

It is not unusual for the governor to invoke his father during public engagements, as he did here during his State of the State address last year.

It is not unusual for the governor to invoke his father during public engagements, as he did here during his State of the State address last year.Credit...Hans Pennink/Associated Press

The quote was obviously meant to draw an odious comparison with the Republican in the White House who seems immune to feeling others’ pain.

The two men go back. According to the Trump biographer Tim O’Brien, Fred Trump was a regular customer at Andrea Cuomo’s grocery store in Queens. Andrew and Donald knew each other as they rose in Gotham. They were never friends, but Donald Trump donated to Mario Cuomo’s campaigns and made a tape for Andrew’s bachelor party, warning him, “Whatever you do, Andrew, don’t ever, ever fool around.”

Both men have often had the twin designation of charming and ruthless. The president is pure id, and when the governor was his father’s consigliere, he was known as “Mario Cuomo’s id.” Over the years, both have been called manipulative, expedient, bullying, vindictive, arrogant wheeler-dealers. They have both been described as obsessed with their press, thin-skinned and quick to belittle or intimidate critics.

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 Mr. Cuomo was his father’s campaign manager in 1982.Credit...William E. Sauro/The New York Times

But, as Lis Smith, the Democratic strategist who rumbled in New York politics before becoming Mayor Pete’s Pygmalion, said, “Trump is selfishly ruthless for his own personal gain while Cuomo is more benevolently ruthless.”

She continued: “It also helps that Cuomo knows intimately how to bend the different levers of government to his will. It’s where you see having been at HUD, having been an attorney general of New York, having been a governor for 10 years — all that pays off. Ruthlessness is good, if it’s for a good purpose. F.D.R. was ruthless.”

I wrote admiringly about Cuomo’s L.B.J.-style blend of the velvet glove and the brass knuckles when he did what Barack Obama did not deign to do in 2009 and clawed back millions from the rapacious financiers scarfing up bonuses while they were taking federal bailout money; when he pushed to legalize same-sex marriage in New York in 2011; and when he rammed through a gun control bill after the Sandy Hook children were slaughtered, surpassing Obama’s efforts again.

“It took a terrible political toll on me, but it’s still the best gun law in the nation,” Cuomo says now.

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 Two years ago he participated in a “die-in” to honor the victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.Credit...Kevin P. Coughlin/Office of the Governor

He learned how to be a mechanic when he was a teenage gas station attendant in Queens and a tow-truck driver for the AAA with the call signal “Queens-15.” And he still likes to get under the hood with a wrench and fix things, from the state budget to the engines of his light blue ’75 Corvette and dark blue ’68 GTO.

It is jarring to watch officials like Governor Cuomo and Dr. Anthony Fauci, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, who have worked their way up through the system, gaining valuable wisdom, have to delicately deal with Donald Trump, the barbarian who crashed through the gates and who is ignorant about — and disdains — the bureaucracy he leads.

Trump is now using the ego arithmetic he once used to brag about the ratings he got on Larry King’s show or the number of TV cameras he saw at rallies to falsely claim that his administration has done more tests than anyone and that everyone who wants a test can get one. He boasts about having the best tests on earth the same way he used to brag about having the best rolls in the city in the restaurant at Trump Tower.

The governor got heated on Tuesday about the elusive ventilators Trump kept promising. But in this crisis, Cuomo has put his own enormous ego aside to tend to the president’s, lacing his briefings with whatever praise for Trump is justified, willing to do what it takes to get what New York needs.

The subtext is on vivid display, though, when Cuomo tweets: “Facts are empowering. Even when the facts are discouraging, not knowing the facts is worse. I promise that I will continue to give New Yorkers all the facts, not selective facts.”

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 Dr. Anthony Fauci listening to President Trump during a coronavirus briefing at the White House.Credit...Erin Schaff/The New York Times

The governor also makes a point of praising Fauci, whose honesty has irritated a president who is intent on obscuring science with spin. Cuomo said that through their constant calls, including in the middle of the night, they have become friends and that Fauci is “so personally kind.”

Itching to get his crackling economy back, recklessly urging Americans to gather for Easter Mass, the president sent a letter to the nation’s governors on Thursday saying that his administration is working on changing its social distancing guidelines, classifying counties as high risk, medium risk and low risk.

But this is asinine because we don’t have universal testing so we don’t know who is carrying the virus and because people travel with it. Unlike Trump the fabulist, Cuomo the realist doesn’t shoot from the hip.

Trump, who is always alert to great performances by people who look perfectly cast, is well aware of the potency of Cuomo’s briefings. He veers between acting like Cuomo is ungrateful and should “do more” and acting like they are working together very well, depending on how thankful the governor seems for the president’s efforts.

It was clear that Trump did not appreciate Cuomo pushing aggressively and publicly for the president to utilize the Defense Production Act so that New York could get 30,000 ventilators. On Thursday night Trump told Sean Hannity that he had “a feeling that a lot of the numbers that are being said in some areas are just bigger than they’re going to be. I don’t believe you need 40,000 or 30,000 ventilators.” But then he added, “I’m getting along very well with Governor Cuomo.”

On Friday, the governor hit back. “Well, look, I don’t have a crystal ball,” he said. “Everybody’s entitled to their own opinion. But I don’t operate here on opinion. I operate on facts and on data and on numbers and on projections.”

He implicitly mocked Trump’s tendency to rely on his feelings rather than data. “I hope some natural weather change happens overnight and kills the virus globally,” he said. “That’s what I hope. But that’s my hope. That’s my emotion. That’s my thought.”

Bizarrely, Trump tweeted Friday that the governor had simply misplaced the ventilators: “Thousand of Federal Government (delivered) Ventilators found in New York storage. N.Y. must distribute NOW!” To which Cuomo responded that the president was wrong and “grossly uninformed.”

The back-to-back daily press conferences of the governor and the president showcase some primal differences about how they see the country.

Cuomo thinks what defines America is its humanity and its welcome mat for the globe. Trump’s view seems to be the economy über alles, even if we have to leave some stragglers on the field.

After risibly saying he never does anything rash, Trump insisted: “But the country wants to get back to work, our country was built to get back to work. We don’t have a country where they say, ‘Hey, let’s close it down for two years.’”

He seems to be following the George W. Bush playbook from Hurricane Katrina: Instead of going all in to save lives, he shrugs and says it’s the states’ responsibility: We’re at war with nature; the enemy is overwhelming us, but it’s really the local government that’s in charge, not the feds. “We’re not a shipping clerk,” Trump said, when that’s exactly what the federal government should be when nurses are on TV all day begging for face masks.

Unlike Trump, who tries to blame Obama when he’s the one who diluted the pandemic response force, and literally says, “I don’t take responsibility at all,” Cuomo regularly says “Blame me” if anything goes wrong.

When I covered Gov. Mario Cuomo, he expressed his disdain for a political Darwinism that was overshadowing the nation’s religious principles.

Once, in an interview in his office in 1991, he got down a copy of Teilhard de Chardin from the bookcase and gave it to me, wanting to make sure I absorbed the lessons of the Jesuit scientist and theologian who wrote: “Accept the burgeoning plant of humanity, and tend it, since without your sun, it will disperse itself wildly and die away.”

He worried that government had strayed too far away from Franklin Roosevelt, another governor of New York who felt a strong economy and compassion for the poor went hand in hand. He worried that America was spending “more money for bombs, less for babies,” as he said in the sonorous baritone that his son inherited. “More help for the rich, more poor than ever.”

With President Trump on a Darwinian tear, I ask Andrew Cuomo how this crisis will change the way people look at government and how it will affect the 2020 election.

He says that, in this era where personalities and celebrities rule politics, the pandemic “changes the lens on government and you’re going to now inquire about experience and capacity and your past performance, almost like the normal hiring process. We got to a place in government where credentials didn’t matter and performance didn’t matter.” This, he said, would never happen “if you were interviewing a lawyer or a doctor or a nanny.”

I ask him if all this has revived his dreams of a presidential run.

After a long pause, he answers: “No. I know presidential politics. I was there in the White House with Clinton. I was there with Gore. No, I’m at peace with who I am and what I’m doing.

His friends say that he will be loyal to Joe Biden. But if Trump is re-elected, they speculate, Cuomo could jump in in 2024, following his 2022 fourth-term re-election in New York. Or if Biden is elected and steps down after one term, Cuomo might get in. But that would mean he’d be up against whichever woman Biden chooses as his veep." 

“He’ll get criticized with the same B.S. about ‘ambition’ for going against ‘the woman candidate,’ much in the same way he did going against Carl McCall in New York, but so what?” said one Cuomo ally, referring to his unsuccessful campaign for governor in 2002. “It’s hardly a clean, wholesome game. And someday soon, don’t we really need to return to what leadership actually is, as opposed to symbolism?”

”His friends say that he will be loyal to Joe Biden. But if Trump is re-elected, they speculate, Cuomo could jump in in 2024, following his 2022 fourth-term re-election in New York. Or if Biden is elected and steps down after one term, Cuomo might get in. But that would mean he’d be up against whichever woman Biden chooses as his veep

Cuomo has been through valleys — his divorce amid a cheating scandal; his father’s political disappointments; his own. He talks about character so much that he can sound like a televangelist at times.

“You can tell the strong from the weak, the selfish from the gracious,” he tells me. “I mean, these nurses who are willing to go take blood at these drive-through centers? What courageous, beautiful people. I have other people who won’t show up for work. I have legislators who say, ‘Well, we’re not coming to the capital.’”

Before the governor gets back to his horrific night shift and a dawn wake-up call, I ask him how this Armageddon, which we know will last for months and months, will affect our identity.

“We’ll have a different country — better or worse, I don’t know,” Cuomo says. “It will have a different personality. It will be more fearful. Less trusting. But maybe there will be a greater need for intimacy.”

Mario Cuomo was known as Hamlet on the Hudson. He analyzed his worthiness so much, he left the field to the privileged, pampered preppies who never analyzed their worthiness — George H.W. Bush and Dan Quayle.

When Mario was doing a Socratic striptease about whether to challenge Bill Clinton for the presidency in 1991, one woman got so impatient with his dithering, she mailed him a needlepoint pillow with the message “Carpe Diem.”

Now Andrew Cuomo is trying to wrest the lifesaving materials he needs from another privileged, pampered guy in the White House who never worries about his worthiness.

But this Cuomo doesn’t need a pillow. Carpe diem is in his bones.

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12 hours ago, mr6666 said:
 
In absolute terms, the U.S. has done a lot of testing,
but on a per-capita basis, we're pretty far behind some other nations.
As importantly, it varies wildly between the states, as this chart by one of data users shows.
 
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What worries me about this graph is that it might not be so much that New York is the epicenter of COVID in the USA,  but that they have tested such a larger percentage of their population  than other states that they have a better idea of where they stand. Although, no doubt, they are overwhelmed with cases.

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41 minutes ago, LsDoorMat said:

What worries me about this graph is that it might not be so much that New York is the epicenter of COVID in the USA,  but that they have tested such a larger percentage of their population  than other states that they have a better idea of where they stand. Although, no doubt, they are overwhelmed with cases.

Per capita South Korea and Italy have tested 3 times the people that the U.S. has.

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The recent "spat" between Trump and Michigan governor  Gretchen Whitmer was an unfortunate and needless distraction from the fact that the situation with the virus is more serious than Trump at first thought and still seems to think.  And his holding back needed supplies to my state because he felt the governor  didn't "treat him right" shows the immense immaturity of his character.  Holding up such shipments until his finally doing so was done more to make him look good to the press put thousands of lives in danger here.  HERE, in Michigan, a state he carried in the election and helped put his sorry a s s in office.

Whatta way to show gratitude to his supporters.  In today's Sunday Detroit Free Press, writer MITCH ALBOM (I'd suggest looking his column of today up)  Saw fit to address Trump's behavior by quoting the New Testament(Corinthians  13:11)------

"When I was a child I spoke as a child.  But when I became a man I put away childish things"-----  And then followed it with----

"Time's up Mr. president."     :D 

To her credit, Whitmer did nothing less than many other governors facing similar circumstances.   And as coronavirus makes NO distinctions between right-wing or left, it's only responsible that our duly elected "leader" makes no distinctions either. 

Sepiatone

 

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

 

In this nightmarish moment, we’re feeling warm and fuzzy about the cold and calculating Andrew Cuomo.

By Maureen Dowd 

WASHINGTON — It’s no wonder that watching Andrew Cuomo’s daily briefings can make some people crave Chianti and meatballs.

Besides coolly explaining the facts in this terrifying and stultifying plague season, the governor of New York evokes the feeling of a big Italian family dinner table.

And that is the intended effect.

“Call it psychological,” Governor Cuomo, phoning from Albany, tells me. “Call it feelings. Call it emotions. But this is as much a social crisis as a health crisis.”

 

I, and others I know, call them boring and egotistical.  While he has good points to make, no way he needs to go on and on and on every day.  Don't care much for his "stage" set-up behind the big desk or table while he gesticulates and so forth.  Reminds me of Army commanders and civilian managers who used their desks and offices as props to bolster their egos and to make sure you knew they were "superior."

Again, not saying he does not have many truths to tell, but just don't care for how he is doing it.

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Largest hospital chain in S.C. announces layoffs due to loss of income due to not performing elective surgeries.  Also increased costs of treating COVID 19 patients.  The chain has two hospitals at least that do nothing but joint replacements.  Wouldn't be surprised that physical therapy and similar activities will be announcing layoffs, if not already done.

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35 minutes ago, TheCid said:

Largest hospital chain in S.C. announces layoffs due to loss of income due to not performing elective surgeries.  Also increased costs of treating COVID 19 patients.  The chain has two hospitals at least that do nothing but joint replacements.  Wouldn't be surprised that physical therapy and similar activities will be announcing layoffs, if not already done.

They'll be ready when the tidal wave hits their shore .... NOT.

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3 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Let’s ‘Kick Coronavirus’s ****’

In this nightmarish moment, we’re feeling warm and fuzzy about the cold and calculating Andrew Cuomo.

By Maureen Dowd 

WASHINGTON — It’s no wonder that watching Andrew Cuomo’s daily briefings can make some people crave Chianti and meatballs.

Besides coolly explaining the facts in this terrifying and stultifying plague season, the governor of New York evokes the feeling of a big Italian family dinner table.

And that is the intended effect.

“Call it psychological,” Governor Cuomo, phoning from Albany, tells me. “Call it feelings. Call it emotions. But this is as much a social crisis as a health crisis.”

Gov. Andrew Cuomo at a coronavirus briefing in Albany on Thursday. Gov. Andrew Cuomo at a coronavirus briefing in Albany on Thursday.Credit...Gabby Jones for The New York Times

Often in the past, when people called Cuomo patriarchal, it was not meant as a compliment. It was a way to describe his maniacally controlling behavior, his dark zeal to muscle past people and obstacles to get his way. The Times’s Adam Nagourney dubbed him the “human bulldozer,” and a former adviser once put it this way: “The governor thinks he’s a hammer. So everyone looks like a nail.” But now, the darker the zeal, the better, if it secures you a mask or ventilator. Given the White House’s deathly delays and the president’s childish rants, America is yearning for a trustworthy parental figure — and a hammer.

The warm, fuzzy feeling for the cold, calculating pol that developed among many Democrats in the past week was summed up by Bill Maher, who told me: “I see Cuomo as the Democratic nominee this year. If we could switch Biden out for him, that’s the winner.” He added, “He’s unlikable, which I really like.”

Progressives still have problems with Cuomo’s stances on Medicaid and the criminal justice system. And some people thought that he waited too long to totally button up New York, although the governor maintains that his systematic rolling closure was designed to prevent panic in the streets.

But even Jezebel blew him a kiss with a post by Rebecca Fishbein headlined, “Help, I Think I’m in Love With Andrew Cuomo???,” chronicling how, solo in her Brooklyn apartment, she has become addicted to Cuomo’s briefings and morphed from intense distaste for him to admiration for his “measured bullying.”

The governor actually called her to check in. On his own, after his 2005 divorce from Kerry Kennedy and his split last year from the TV chef and author Sandra Lee, he’d been thinking about the isolation of singles.

“You know, it was sad, the piece,” he tells me. “Being alone in your apartment for virtually 24 hours a day for days and days in this fearful situation and there’s no one to lay on the couch with and watch TV with, and no one to hold. That’s terrible.”

To the surprise of many who did not associate the name “Andrew Cuomo” with the word “empathy,” the governor has become a sort of national shrink, talking us through our fear, our loss and our growing stir-craziness.

“This is going be a long day, and it’s going to be a hard day, and it’s going to be an ugly day, and it’s going to be a sad day,” he told officers from the New York National Guard on Friday, charging them to fight this “invisible” and “insidious” beast and “kick coronavirus’s ****.”

Because New York is at the epicenter of the epidemic in the United States, with 519 deaths and 44,635 confirmed cases, as of noon Friday, Americans have their eyes on the state. Cuomo knows this. “New York is the canary in the coal mine,” he said during one of his passionate televised pleas for the president to provide more ventilators.

It is more than passing strange that in this horror-movie moment, with 13 people dying on Tuesday at Elmhurst Hospital in Queens and a refrigerated truck parked outside to collect the bodies, the nation’s two most prominent leaders are both Queens scions. Both men grew up in the shadows of their fathers, the hard-working sons of European immigrants.

The Trump family is a model of bad nepotism — noblesse oblige in reverse. Such is their reputation as scammers that congressional Democrats felt the need to put a provision in the coronavirus rescue bill to try to prevent Trump-and-Kushner Inc. from carving out a treat of their own.

Mr. Cuomo in 1988. He started a nonprofit agency that promoted housing for the homeless in the 1980s.

Mr. Cuomo in 1988. He started a nonprofit agency that promoted housing for the homeless in the 1980s.Credit...Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times

Cuomo has brought two of his adult daughters onstage with him at briefings. He warned the 22-year-old Michaela to forsake parties celebrating her graduation — in absentia — from Brown. “Risk, reward,” he lectured her in front of millions.

And Cuomo gave his 25-year-old daughter Cara a dollar-a-year job on the virus task force, echoing the time his father gave him a dollar-a-year job as an adviser when he was about her age.

His brother, Chris, hosts a CNN show. The 62-year-old governor goes on it to bicker and banter with his 49-year-old baby brother about everything from the women swooning over Andrew’s machismo style on Twitter — “You know that what people are saying about how you look really can’t be accurate,” Chris teased — to their relative prowess at basketball.

In his briefings, Andrew Cuomo talks about how cabin fever is causing him to get annoyed with his dog, a Northern Inuit named Captain. He talks about stopping his sisters from bringing their kids to see his 88-year-old mother, Matilda, who is “pure sugar” but vulnerable to the virus. He says his mother was a little annoyed when he named a social distancing guideline for the most vulnerable “Matilda’s Law” in her honor.

His mother, Matilda Cuomo, gave him a kiss after he took his third oath of office as governor in January 2019.
His mother, Matilda Cuomo, gave him a kiss after he took his third oath of office as governor in January 2019.Credit...Richard Drew/Associated Press

After Dan Patrick, the lieutenant governor of Texas, suggested that older Americans might be willing to sacrifice themselves for the good of their grandchildren’s economy and President Trump buoyantly called for America to reopen as soon as Easter, Cuomo said flatly, “My mother’s not expendable.” He also tweeted: “You cannot put a value on human life. You do the right thing. That’s what Pop taught us.”

At Wednesday’s briefing, he displayed a picture of Mario Cuomo, who died in 2015, amid all the graphs on infections.

“He’s not here anymore for you,” he said, but “He’s still here for me.”

He offered a quote from his dad about what government should be: “The idea of family, mutuality, the sharing of benefits and burdens for the good of all, feeling one another’s pain, sharing one another’s blessings — reasonably, honestly, fairly, without respect to race or sex or geography or political affiliation.”

It is not unusual for the governor to invoke his father during public engagements, as he did here during his State of the State address last year.

It is not unusual for the governor to invoke his father during public engagements, as he did here during his State of the State address last year.Credit...Hans Pennink/Associated Press

The quote was obviously meant to draw an odious comparison with the Republican in the White House who seems immune to feeling others’ pain.

The two men go back. According to the Trump biographer Tim O’Brien, Fred Trump was a regular customer at Andrea Cuomo’s grocery store in Queens. Andrew and Donald knew each other as they rose in Gotham. They were never friends, but Donald Trump donated to Mario Cuomo’s campaigns and made a tape for Andrew’s bachelor party, warning him, “Whatever you do, Andrew, don’t ever, ever fool around.”

Both men have often had the twin designation of charming and ruthless. The president is pure id, and when the governor was his father’s consigliere, he was known as “Mario Cuomo’s id.” Over the years, both have been called manipulative, expedient, bullying, vindictive, arrogant wheeler-dealers. They have both been described as obsessed with their press, thin-skinned and quick to belittle or intimidate critics.

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 Mr. Cuomo was his father’s campaign manager in 1982.Credit...William E. Sauro/The New York Times

But, as Lis Smith, the Democratic strategist who rumbled in New York politics before becoming Mayor Pete’s Pygmalion, said, “Trump is selfishly ruthless for his own personal gain while Cuomo is more benevolently ruthless.”

She continued: “It also helps that Cuomo knows intimately how to bend the different levers of government to his will. It’s where you see having been at HUD, having been an attorney general of New York, having been a governor for 10 years — all that pays off. Ruthlessness is good, if it’s for a good purpose. F.D.R. was ruthless.”

I wrote admiringly about Cuomo’s L.B.J.-style blend of the velvet glove and the brass knuckles when he did what Barack Obama did not deign to do in 2009 and clawed back millions from the rapacious financiers scarfing up bonuses while they were taking federal bailout money; when he pushed to legalize same-sex marriage in New York in 2011; and when he rammed through a gun control bill after the Sandy Hook children were slaughtered, surpassing Obama’s efforts again.

“It took a terrible political toll on me, but it’s still the best gun law in the nation,” Cuomo says now.

29dowd12-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&aut

 Two years ago he participated in a “die-in” to honor the victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.Credit...Kevin P. Coughlin/Office of the Governor

He learned how to be a mechanic when he was a teenage gas station attendant in Queens and a tow-truck driver for the AAA with the call signal “Queens-15.” And he still likes to get under the hood with a wrench and fix things, from the state budget to the engines of his light blue ’75 Corvette and dark blue ’68 GTO.

It is jarring to watch officials like Governor Cuomo and Dr. Anthony Fauci, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, who have worked their way up through the system, gaining valuable wisdom, have to delicately deal with Donald Trump, the barbarian who crashed through the gates and who is ignorant about — and disdains — the bureaucracy he leads.

Trump is now using the ego arithmetic he once used to brag about the ratings he got on Larry King’s show or the number of TV cameras he saw at rallies to falsely claim that his administration has done more tests than anyone and that everyone who wants a test can get one. He boasts about having the best tests on earth the same way he used to brag about having the best rolls in the city in the restaurant at Trump Tower.

The governor got heated on Tuesday about the elusive ventilators Trump kept promising. But in this crisis, Cuomo has put his own enormous ego aside to tend to the president’s, lacing his briefings with whatever praise for Trump is justified, willing to do what it takes to get what New York needs.

The subtext is on vivid display, though, when Cuomo tweets: “Facts are empowering. Even when the facts are discouraging, not knowing the facts is worse. I promise that I will continue to give New Yorkers all the facts, not selective facts.”

29dowd13-articleLarge.jpg?quality=75&aut

 Dr. Anthony Fauci listening to President Trump during a coronavirus briefing at the White House.Credit...Erin Schaff/The New York Times

The governor also makes a point of praising Fauci, whose honesty has irritated a president who is intent on obscuring science with spin. Cuomo said that through their constant calls, including in the middle of the night, they have become friends and that Fauci is “so personally kind.”

Itching to get his crackling economy back, recklessly urging Americans to gather for Easter Mass, the president sent a letter to the nation’s governors on Thursday saying that his administration is working on changing its social distancing guidelines, classifying counties as high risk, medium risk and low risk.

But this is asinine because we don’t have universal testing so we don’t know who is carrying the virus and because people travel with it. Unlike Trump the fabulist, Cuomo the realist doesn’t shoot from the hip.

Trump, who is always alert to great performances by people who look perfectly cast, is well aware of the potency of Cuomo’s briefings. He veers between acting like Cuomo is ungrateful and should “do more” and acting like they are working together very well, depending on how thankful the governor seems for the president’s efforts.

It was clear that Trump did not appreciate Cuomo pushing aggressively and publicly for the president to utilize the Defense Production Act so that New York could get 30,000 ventilators. On Thursday night Trump told Sean Hannity that he had “a feeling that a lot of the numbers that are being said in some areas are just bigger than they’re going to be. I don’t believe you need 40,000 or 30,000 ventilators.” But then he added, “I’m getting along very well with Governor Cuomo.”

On Friday, the governor hit back. “Well, look, I don’t have a crystal ball,” he said. “Everybody’s entitled to their own opinion. But I don’t operate here on opinion. I operate on facts and on data and on numbers and on projections.”

He implicitly mocked Trump’s tendency to rely on his feelings rather than data. “I hope some natural weather change happens overnight and kills the virus globally,” he said. “That’s what I hope. But that’s my hope. That’s my emotion. That’s my thought.”

Bizarrely, Trump tweeted Friday that the governor had simply misplaced the ventilators: “Thousand of Federal Government (delivered) Ventilators found in New York storage. N.Y. must distribute NOW!” To which Cuomo responded that the president was wrong and “grossly uninformed.”

The back-to-back daily press conferences of the governor and the president showcase some primal differences about how they see the country.

Cuomo thinks what defines America is its humanity and its welcome mat for the globe. Trump’s view seems to be the economy über alles, even if we have to leave some stragglers on the field.

After risibly saying he never does anything rash, Trump insisted: “But the country wants to get back to work, our country was built to get back to work. We don’t have a country where they say, ‘Hey, let’s close it down for two years.’”

He seems to be following the George W. Bush playbook from Hurricane Katrina: Instead of going all in to save lives, he shrugs and says it’s the states’ responsibility: We’re at war with nature; the enemy is overwhelming us, but it’s really the local government that’s in charge, not the feds. “We’re not a shipping clerk,” Trump said, when that’s exactly what the federal government should be when nurses are on TV all day begging for face masks.

Unlike Trump, who tries to blame Obama when he’s the one who diluted the pandemic response force, and literally says, “I don’t take responsibility at all,” Cuomo regularly says “Blame me” if anything goes wrong.

When I covered Gov. Mario Cuomo, he expressed his disdain for a political Darwinism that was overshadowing the nation’s religious principles.

Once, in an interview in his office in 1991, he got down a copy of Teilhard de Chardin from the bookcase and gave it to me, wanting to make sure I absorbed the lessons of the Jesuit scientist and theologian who wrote: “Accept the burgeoning plant of humanity, and tend it, since without your sun, it will disperse itself wildly and die away.”

He worried that government had strayed too far away from Franklin Roosevelt, another governor of New York who felt a strong economy and compassion for the poor went hand in hand. He worried that America was spending “more money for bombs, less for babies,” as he said in the sonorous baritone that his son inherited. “More help for the rich, more poor than ever.”

With President Trump on a Darwinian tear, I ask Andrew Cuomo how this crisis will change the way people look at government and how it will affect the 2020 election.

He says that, in this era where personalities and celebrities rule politics, the pandemic “changes the lens on government and you’re going to now inquire about experience and capacity and your past performance, almost like the normal hiring process. We got to a place in government where credentials didn’t matter and performance didn’t matter.” This, he said, would never happen “if you were interviewing a lawyer or a doctor or a nanny.”

I ask him if all this has revived his dreams of a presidential run.

After a long pause, he answers: “No. I know presidential politics. I was there in the White House with Clinton. I was there with Gore. No, I’m at peace with who I am and what I’m doing.

His friends say that he will be loyal to Joe Biden. But if Trump is re-elected, they speculate, Cuomo could jump in in 2024, following his 2022 fourth-term re-election in New York. Or if Biden is elected and steps down after one term, Cuomo might get in. But that would mean he’d be up against whichever woman Biden chooses as his veep." 

“He’ll get criticized with the same B.S. about ‘ambition’ for going against ‘the woman candidate,’ much in the same way he did going against Carl McCall in New York, but so what?” said one Cuomo ally, referring to his unsuccessful campaign for governor in 2002. “It’s hardly a clean, wholesome game. And someday soon, don’t we really need to return to what leadership actually is, as opposed to symbolism?”

”His friends say that he will be loyal to Joe Biden. But if Trump is re-elected, they speculate, Cuomo could jump in in 2024, following his 2022 fourth-term re-election in New York. Or if Biden is elected and steps down after one term, Cuomo might get in. But that would mean he’d be up against whichever woman Biden chooses as his veep

Cuomo has been through valleys — his divorce amid a cheating scandal; his father’s political disappointments; his own. He talks about character so much that he can sound like a televangelist at times.

“You can tell the strong from the weak, the selfish from the gracious,” he tells me. “I mean, these nurses who are willing to go take blood at these drive-through centers? What courageous, beautiful people. I have other people who won’t show up for work. I have legislators who say, ‘Well, we’re not coming to the capital.’”

Before the governor gets back to his horrific night shift and a dawn wake-up call, I ask him how this Armageddon, which we know will last for months and months, will affect our identity.

“We’ll have a different country — better or worse, I don’t know,” Cuomo says. “It will have a different personality. It will be more fearful. Less trusting. But maybe there will be a greater need for intimacy.”

Mario Cuomo was known as Hamlet on the Hudson. He analyzed his worthiness so much, he left the field to the privileged, pampered preppies who never analyzed their worthiness — George H.W. Bush and Dan Quayle.

When Mario was doing a Socratic striptease about whether to challenge Bill Clinton for the presidency in 1991, one woman got so impatient with his dithering, she mailed him a needlepoint pillow with the message “Carpe Diem.”

Now Andrew Cuomo is trying to wrest the lifesaving materials he needs from another privileged, pampered guy in the White House who never worries about his worthiness.

But this Cuomo doesn’t need a pillow. Carpe diem is in his bones.

TRUMP 2020 Trump will trounce Cuomo, NY mob politician , LOL, yeah run him ,He'll do great in the heartland

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20 minutes ago, hamradio said:

 

 

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French chocolatier Jean-Francois Pre designed easter eggs shaped like a novel Coronavirus, and will be sending them to President Trump for Easter

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4 hours ago, jakeem said:

FwMbo0CG_bigger.jpg

Latest #coronavirus numbers:

U.S. Cases: 121,959 (from 102,074 yesterday a.m.)

U.S. Deaths: 2042 (from 1,605 yesterday a.m.) (Source: @NBCNews)

Global Cases: 679,977 (from 615,519 yesterday a.m.)

Global Deaths: 31,734 Global Recoveries: 145,625 (Source: @JohnsHopkins)

8:42 AM · Mar 29, 2020·Twitter Web App

 

4 hours ago, jakeem said:

 

4 hours ago, jakeem said:

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Replying to
 
The American public is unfortunately about to get a lesson in exponential growth. In times like this we need leadership at the top but it's just not there.
 
9:53 AM · Mar 29, 2020·Twitter Web App

 

4 hours ago, jakeem said:

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On February 28, the President referred to the coronavirus concern as a Democratic Party “hoax.”
 
7:30 AM · Mar 29, 2020·Twitter for iPhone

 A Democratic party hoax promoted by the left-wing liberal mainstream media.

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