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Performances of Limited Screen Time That Still Have A Jolting Impact


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1 hour ago, karlofffan said:

As a certified Crazy Cat Person (TM), this character is what I aspire to be.

Not familiar with this film.  Some of those cats must have been drugged to have been so placid on set!

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Ernest Whitman, shown here with Melvin Douglas in the 1940 romcom Third Finger, Left Hand, plays a train porter named Sam who's taking law classes...

Ernest+Whitman+%2528L%2529+in+Tell+No+Ta

...and who Douglas introduces as his lawyer to his soon to be ex-wife played by Myrna Loy while both are on the same train to Reno, and with hopes of delaying the impending divorce as it becomes apparent that Douglas and Loy are still in love.

Whitman's Sam is shown to be a man of intellect, keen wit and insight, and of equal standing with all the other characters in this film, and which of course was a rare movie role for a man of color during that time.

(...I watched this film for the first time recently on TCM, and Whitman's short but wonderful performance during the second half of this film has stuck in my mind since)

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Speaking of "a jolting impact" made me wonder:  Has there ever been a movie where a character with a short-and-sweet-yet-memorable role got electrocuted?  There's gotta be at least 1 movie I would think.   

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20 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

Speaking of "a jolting impact" made me wonder:  Has there ever been a movie where a character with a short-and-sweet-yet-memorable role got electrocuted?  There's gotta be at least 1 movie I would think.   

Hmmm...well, it's not a small role of course, but the first actor to come to mind in this sort of scenario was Michael Clark Duncan who was nominated for Best Supporting Actor in 1999's The Green Mile.

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14 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

That's better than what I thought of . . . which was nothing!  :P

LOL

Well then, I guess that makes it...

Dargo-1

Gorman-0

...doesn't it!

(...and I'm sending in my ace reliever from the bullpen now, and so don't expect any kind'a last minute comeback here, dude!) ;)

 

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On 2/14/2020 at 6:18 AM, Mr. Gorman said:

Speaking of "a jolting impact" made me wonder:  Has there ever been a movie where a character with a short-and-sweet-yet-memorable role got electrocuted?  There's gotta be at least 1 movie I would think.   

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Harold Sakata!

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John Qualen as Muley Bates in The Grapes of Wrath (1940).  He sets up the entire film by informing us and Henry Fonda, who has been away in the clink how much times have changed for the farmers who are now being forced from their land.  Qualen gives a very emotional performance and if it had been at the end of the film instead of the start it may have gotten more attention.

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On 2/13/2020 at 10:18 PM, Mr. Gorman said:

Speaking of "a jolting impact" made me wonder:  Has there ever been a movie where a character with a short-and-sweet-yet-memorable role got electrocuted?  There's gotta be at least 1 movie I would think.   

 

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On 2/13/2020 at 9:01 PM, karlofffan said:

Madame Spivy (Bertha Levine) as Ma Greeny in Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962).

Requiem_for_a_Heavyweight_(1962)_trailer_2.jpg

Was just reading about Spivy yesterday.  She was unfamiliar to me, though after I started reading and seeing her photos, I recognized her from The Manchurian Candidate.  She was quite the bon vivant, owning her own nightclub/cabaret and opening similar clubs in Europe.  I started down that rabbit hole because I was watching a 1976 interview of Paul Lynde on The Tonight Show, and he told a story about working at Spivy's in NYC when he was just starting in the business.  She had quite a repertoire of risque songs (for the era) before opening her own place.  She later moved into film and TV work.  

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

Was just reading about Spivy yesterday.  She was unfamiliar to me, though after I started reading and seeing her photos, I recognized her from The Manchurian Candidate.  She was quite the bon vivant, owning her own nightclub/cabaret and opening similar clubs in Europe.  I started down that rabbit hole because I was watching a 1976 interview of Paul Lynde on The Tonight Show, and he told a story about working at Spivy's in NYC when he was just starting in the business.  She had quite a repertoire of risque songs (for the era) before opening her own place.  She later moved into film and TV work.  

Yep tx, I went down this same rabbit hole a few years ago after catching Spivy in one of the few films she was ever in when it was shown on TCM, although I'm not sure which film it was now. I also then remember watching the YouTube video of Paul Lynde's recounting his early days in the biz at her nightclub to Johnny Carson on his program. As I recall, Lynde was not a frequent guest at all on Johnny's show.

Just wanted to say I also found it interesting stuff just as you have here.

And now regarding Paul Lynde here, I now am going to offer up one of THE funniest lines I ever heard on the old Hollywood Squares game show:

Peter Marshall: "Paul, true or false. Swimming in the nude can help you swim faster."

Paul Lynde: "No, false, but it'll help ya STEAR!"

(...told ya it was funny, didn't I?!...and especially so if you can imagine the line being said in Lynde's distinctive voice and cadence)

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17 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yep tx, I went down this same rabbit hole a few years ago after catching Spivy in one of the few films she was ever in when it was shown on TCM, although I'm not sure which film it was now. I also then remember watching the YouTube video of Paul Lynde's recounting his early days in the biz at her nightclub to Johnny Carson on his program. As I recall, Lynde was not a frequent guest at all on Johnny's show.

Just wanted to say I also found it interesting stuff just as you have here.

And now regarding Paul Lynde here, I now am going to offer up one of THE funniest lines I ever heard on the old Hollywood Squares game show:

Peter Marshall: "Paul, true or false. Swimming in the nude can help you swim faster."

Paul Lynde: "No, false, but it'll help ya STEAR!"

(...told ya it was funny, didn't I?!)

It may have been Paul Lynde on a chat show that was recalling a line of dialogue of his character on a soap opera who had just returned from a journey ...

"Do the stairs still lead to the basement?"

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12 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

It may have been Paul Lynde on a chat show that was recalling a line of dialogue of his character on a soap opera who had just returned from a journey ...

"Do the stairs still lead to the basement?"

Yeah, maybe so Bogie.

FWIW, I just found this clip of Carson's show in which Lynde guested, and which txfilmfan and I have just referenced, and in which near the end of it he mentions working at Spivy's nightclub...

 

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Can't believe nobody has beaten me to this one, though the film has been mentioned here. He's the character everyone talks about but is only on screen once. And memorably. 

 

Edit: woops! Well more than once but this is his first appearance (if I recall, and my memory is obviously failing me)

 

Can't find his full second scene but here is his bon mot and exit.

 

 

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31 minutes ago, LuckyDan said:

Can't believe nobody has beaten me to this one, though the film has been mentioned here. He's the character everyone talks about but is only on screen once. And memorably. 

 

Edit: woops! Well more than once but this is his first appearance (if I recall, and my memory is obviously failing me)

 

Can't find his full second scene but here is his bon mot and exit.

 

 

Yep, Dan. Like you said, more than once.

As I'm sure you know, Orson is also featured near the end of this great film attempting to escape the police and his old pal Holly via the Vienna sewer system.

And in another scene isn't he also shown making an ill-advised visit to his old girlfriend Anna's apartment while he's on the lam at one point in the film?

(...sorry to say, but I don't think Orson's Harry Lime really fits the premise of this thread...love the movie though and definitely place it in my Top 10 favs of all time)

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Truth can be stranger than fiction ...

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Chris Sarandon as Leon Shermer in Dog Day Afternoon (1975).  Sarandon has a small but pivotal role in Dog Day and gives a bravura performance.  The police haul him in to give assistance in the bank robbery hostage situation and he reveals the motivation behind it all.  It's a 'what the ..?"  moment.

 

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2 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

It may have been Paul Lynde on a chat show that was recalling a line of dialogue of his character on a soap opera who had just returned from a journey ...

"Do the stairs still lead to the basement?"

My mistake!  It was Charles Nelson Reilly who said that.  Great nonsensical line of dialogue in any event.

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In his short time on screen, John Carradine here, with his deep stentorian voice, almost talks Jimmy Stewart out of a budding political career in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance...

john-carradine-libertyvalance-3.jpg

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Credited simply as "Billy's mother" or in some cases more aptly as "the Woman" Cara Williams (1925 - ) entered The Defiant Ones (1958) toward the close of the film and was the first real female presence.  She plays a widowed mother who becomes infatuated with escaped con, Tony Curtis and goes to great lengths to keep him.  She provides the test of friendship for Curtis and certainly turned the film on its head.

And before anymore else chimes in, this guy was a pretty powerful presence in The Defiant Ones as well ...

1118full-the-defiant-ones-(1958)-screens

Lon Chaney, Jr. as "Big Sam" in The Defiant Ones (1958).

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Houseley Stevenson, who plays the creepy back alley plastic surgeon Dr. Walter Coley in Dark Passage, is one of the best things about this Bogart/Bacall (and often implausible) movie...

darkpassage-06.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Houseley Stevenson, who plays the creepy back alley plastic surgeon Dr. Walter Coley in Dark Passage, is one of the best things about this Bogart/Bacall (and often implausible) movie...

darkpassage-06.jpg

 

How desperate must you be to go through with that surgery after finding out he is your doctor?

I also think Agnes Moorehead is great in this film, but she probably appears in the film too much to fit the thread's topic.

Image result for agnes moorehead dark passage

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