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lydecker

Washington Post's Take On "Who Should Have Won Best Picture"

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1 hour ago, spence said:

Hanks said on his THE MOVIES CNN special that due to all the technical aspects it was the most difficult film yet made!

I remember Ebert & Siskel & others were furious it wasn't up for BP & BD but did win 4 Oscars

 

Given this era al;ways surprised there wasn't a sequel, probably because it was so hard to make

 

(P.S. Sadly, Hoskins is already gone at just age 71 in 2014, he was all set to play Al Capone in THE UNTOUCHABLES, but De Niro became available   SEE: Long good Friday, Mona Lisa & Cotton Club)

I doubt that Siskel and Ebert were "furious," perhaps just disappointed or confused. 

Perhaps it was difficult to produce or what not, but that doesn't mean that it has to be one of my favorites of the year.  There were bits and pieces that I liked--I loved seeing the Warner Brothers and Disney characters together.  But there wasn't really anything about the movie that made me want to see it again.  I love the ride though.  I like it because you can make your taxicab spin around while you go through the ride.   The ride also has a great queue. 

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3 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

honest to god, for me, TOM HANKS'S finest acting moment is in THE MONEY PIT where his character is stuck in a rug that has sunken into a hole in the second floor of his fixer-upper from hell house for SEVERAL HOURS and is delirious and hallucinating and thinks that THE SMURFS have been visiting.

Okay I will take back not having rewatched his films. Tom Hanks does a great job as Woody in the Toy Story series.  I have seen the first two multiple times.  I've seen the third one, but only once, because it was so sad I don't know if I can see it again.  I haven't seen the 4th one, and am conflicted on whether or not it should even exist. 

With that said, I have seen his wife, Rita Wilson's appearance on The Brady Bunch more times than I've ever seen a Tom Hanks film, Toy Story included.

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2 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Sigourney Weaver was the first actor/actress nominated twice in the same year not to win for one of them. That dubious feat was later also achieved by Emma Thompson in 1993, Julianne Moore in 2002, and Cate Blanchett in 2007. Scarlett Johansson will likely join their ranks tomorrow night.

AND I remember she was quoted as saying everyone acted very, very sorry for her all night long. to be honest, i have never seen ACCIDENTAL TOURIST, but while I like SIGOURNEY in WORKING GIRL just fine, it's not an Oscar part.

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On 2/7/2020 at 7:34 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I am on my phone, so I can’t make out a lot of these images.
BUT...
there needed to be a feminist revisionist sequel to BIG (1988) where ELIZABETH PERKINS’s character is sent to a mental institution for telling her therapist that she is racked with guilt over a statutory rape she committed on a 12-year-old boy because he was, at the time, in the body of a 30-year-old man. 
SERIOUSLY, I was 10 years old when I saw BIG and that aspect of the movie bothered me A LOT even then.

 

unfortunately, that was a bit common in 1988. (other films did it too that year)

As for the films that year in the picture, Big would be behind (in some degree of order): Running on Empty, My neighbor Totoro, Married to the mob,Madame Sousatzka, A Cry in the Dark,  Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, Zelly and Me, The Accidental Tourist, Stormy Monday, Stand and Deliver, Tucker; The Man and His Dream, Cinema Paradiso, Grave of the Fireflies, Another Woman,  Camille Claudel, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, The naked Gun, Crossing Delancey, Die Hard, Working Girl, Rain Man, Coming to America, Moon Over Parador, and  two or three others too.

i do admit I liked it better than Bull Durham or A Fish Called Wanda, which never felt lively enough in the former's case, or left a bitter aftertaste in the latter's case.

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On 2/7/2020 at 3:06 PM, lydecker said:

Totally agree with you on "Crash."  I liked it. So there's 2 of us! And since there's been so much vitriol about it over the years I decided to see it again recently.  Thought it was fine.  As for   "Brokeback Mountain"   --  it was ok, but nothing special.  I think a lot of people were caught up in the "Gay Cowboys, How Daring Is That!?"  theme and it clouded their opinion of the film.

Don't think so.

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Most critics would prefer Taxi Driver to Network, though I'd vote for All the President's Men.  The Deer Hunter is clearly flawed about Vietnam, but it's clearly superior to the other four.  Tess is actually a great film, and Gandhi is, despite Attenborough's weaknesses as a director, a fine epic about a remarkable hero.  If you had to chose a nominee from 1983, it should be The Right Stuff.  If you could go beyond the 1985 nominees, but still confine oneself to English language films, you should choose Brazil.  The Last Emperor is a great movie.  A Fish Called Wanda was actually the best picture of 1988.  Driving Miss Daisy has many problems, but Jessica Tandy is clearly better than Field of Dreams.  Titanic is a notoriously meretricious movie.  Elizabeth has its virtues (Geoffrey Rush among them), but the director not only watched The Godfather too many times, but missed the point that murdering all your enemies makes you a bad person.  If you had to choose a best picture nominee in 1999 it would be The Insider.  If you had to choose a Fosse musical for best picture, Cabaret and All that Jazz are far more deserving.   Brokeback Mountain is overrated, and Ang Lee doubly so, but Crash is uniquely annoying:  a Stanley Kramer view of racism that manages to be less competent that a Stanley Kramer picture. 

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On 2/11/2020 at 8:31 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I LOVE “A FISH CALLED WANDA”!!!!!

DITTO.

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On 2/11/2020 at 8:31 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I LOVE “A FISH CALLED WANDA”!!!!!

I think I was left offended by the death of the dogs and their owner. It kind of put a pall over the whole film for me. I am reminded that it is the film where somebody died laughing at it in the theatre. Laughed so hard he couldn't breathe. What a way to go.

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13 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

I think I was left offended by the death of the dogs and their owner. It kind of put a pall over the whole film for me. I am reminded that it is the film where somebody died laughing at it in the theatre. Laughed so hard he couldn't breathe. What a way to go.

Better than being eaten by THE BLOB.

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31 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Better than being eaten by THE BLOB.

Re: the original Blob

Does anyone besides me wish that Helen Crump was eaten by "The Blob" ?

She was so annoying on Andy Griffith.  Not even The Blob wanted her, apparently. 

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9 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Re: the original Blob

Does anyone besides me wish that Helen Crump was eaten by "The Blob" ?

She was so annoying on Andy Griffith.  Not even The Blob wanted her, apparently. 

Elinor Donahue seemed the better fit for Andy.

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19 hours ago, skimpole said:

Most critics would prefer Taxi Driver to Network, though I'd vote for All the President's Men. 

That's where my vote would go as well.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Elinor Donahue seemed the better fit for Andy.

He should have hooked up with one of the Fun Girls. Lol.

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

He should have hooked up with one of the Fun Girls. Lol.

Elinor Donahue has stated the reason she left after the first season is that she felt she had no chemistry with Andy Griffith on screen.

There seems to be almost universal dislike of the Helen Crump character.   Supposedly, Aneta Corsaut and Griffith had an affair sometime during the show's run.

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

Elinor Donahue has stated the reason she left after the first season is that she felt she had no chemistry with Andy Griffith on screen.

There seems to be almost universal dislike of the Helen Crump character.   Supposedly, Aneta Corsaut and Griffith had an affair sometime during the show's run.

Helen Crump was such a crabapple. She was always mad at Andy for some reason or another.  How awkward for Opie with his dad dating his teacher!

I hadn't heard about the affair.  Hmm.

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

Helen Crump was such a crabapple. She was always mad at Andy for some reason or another.  How awkward for Opie with his dad dating his teacher!

I hadn't heard about the affair.  Hmm.

She did run hot and cold.  It was usually Barney's fault when she was mad.  He was always trying to get them married, or started some battle of the sexes.

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On 2/7/2020 at 2:49 PM, Roy Cronin said:

Interesting article, and of course everyone has his/her own opinion about these things.  I agree on some, disagree on others.  

One thing that bothered me a bit is the author mentioning numerous times  that now some winning films seem dated or "didn't hold up" so therefore didn't deserve to win. But at the time they are voting, I doubt many Academy members consider that as a factor:  will this film seem too dated 20, 30, 40 years from now?  At the time, they probably seemed particularly relevant.  

Sorry, I disagree. 

I often think a movie will become "dated" as I'm watching it. The one that pops in my head first is Aladdin '92. When I heard the Genie's ramblings my first thought was, "who's going to know this reference in a decade?" While I love Robin Williams comedic genius, I thought it had no place in a kid's Disney cartoon-I much prefer Disney "classics".

And what makes a film a "classic"? A story that touches people of all ages & cultures over a long period of time. That is not opinion or taste, but referring to mainstream, majority.

Many of the films mentioned here "hold up" very well, even predict future mores like NETWORK. Maybe some of the films were voted best picture because they were trail-blazers in technique, something you may not realize in retrospect.

And all of you regulars on this board know my disdain for Tom Hanks. He can't act. (from people I know who worked with him on set) Maybe he just needs strong direction or great script to come across on film.  

I hated Gump, barely got through it. Of course you know what you'll get from a box of chocolates - A CHOCOLATE CANDY!

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14 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

I think I was left offended by the death of the dogs and their owner [in A FISH CALLED WANDA]. It kind of put a pall over the whole film for me. I am reminded that it is the film where somebody died laughing at it in the theatre. Laughed so hard he couldn't breathe. What a way to go.

I watched the steamroller scene yesterday on YouTube, I love it. Damn, KEVIN KLINE was SEXY. 

was 1988 maybe an especially CRUEL year in cinema? (Not complaining, just observing.)

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched the steamroller scene yesterday on YouTube, I love it. Damn, KEVIN KLINE was SEXY. 

was 1988 maybe an especially CRUEL year in cinema? (Not complaining, just observing.)

Hmm, you also had Die Hard out there and The Accused, the dingo getting the baby in A Cry in the Dark, the starvation factor in Grave of the Fireflies, the mind games of Dangerous liaisons and Zelly and Me, the wildlife slaughter in Gorillas in the Mist, pretty much all of Heathers, the high racist activity in Mississippi Burning,  and the human hunt scene in Betrayed, but I'd say thaTt at the time most didn't notice, since all the controversy was directed at The Last Temptation of Christ.

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15 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Hmm, you also had Die Hard out there and The Accused, the dingo getting the baby in A Cry in the Dark, the starvation factor in Grave of the Fireflies, the mind games of Dangerous liaisons and Zelly and Me, the wildlife slaughter in Gorillas in the Mist, pretty much all of Heathers, the high racist activity in Mississippi Burning,  and the human hunt scene in Betrayed, but I'd say thaTt at the time most didn't notice, since all the controversy was directed at The Last Temptation of Christ.

DAMN SIR, THAT IS ASTUTE!!!

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On 2/8/2020 at 1:06 PM, speedracer5 said:

I find with Tom Hanks, while I don't dislike him per se, I never see his films more than once.  I also usually find that he's not my favorite part of the film.  I liked Cast Away, but thought that Wilson delivered the best performance. 

Yeh, that Wilson was a ball!

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