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jakeem

Actor Robert Conrad (1935-2020)

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5 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Another interesting bit of trivia is that during the first season when the cartoon cowboy is

threatened by the saloon girl with a knife in the illustrated opening he kisses her and she is overcome. In later seasons

the cowboy slugs her and knocks her down.

Maybe the original version was too wishy washy. Were they trying to say that West's sexual attraction was so potent, he could make a woman think twice about killing him?

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4 hours ago, jakeem said:

 

Robert Conrad, whose innovative 1960s television Western series "The Wild Wild West" was inspired by the James Bond movie craze, has died at the age of 84. A family spokesperson said the retired actor died Saturday in Malibu, California of heart failure. 

Conrad, whose real name was Conrad Robert Falk, also starred in the TV dramas "Hawaiian Eye" and "Baa, Baa Black Sheep" (also known as "Black Sheep Squadron").

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Created by Michael Garrison at the time the 007 spy films were international hits, "The Wild Wild West" joined the CBS Friday night lineup in September 1965. The first season's episodes were in black and white (CBS would go all-color a year later).

Set in the 1870s, the fanciful series starred Conrad as the stylishly dressed U.S. Secret Service Agent James T. West, who traveled the country's frontier regions in a specially equipped train and made reports to President Ulysses S. Grant (Roy Engel).

West himself was often outfitted with special gadgets designed to get him out of tough jams. Like Maxwell Smart, the character played by Don Adams in the contemporary NBC spy comedy "Get Smart," the 19th-century hero usually had an indispensable shoe.

West was accompanied on most of his law-and-order missions by fellow agent Artemus Gordon (played by Ross Martin), a master of disguise and impersonations. West and Gordon usually found themselves pitted against various and sundry megalomaniacs bent on world domination. One of his frequent foes was the diminutive mastermind Dr. Miguelito Loveless (played by the Oscar-nominated actor Michael Dunn).

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The series had its share of bad luck during its four-season run. In August 1966, producer Garrison died as the result of a fall at his home just before Season 2 episodes began airing on CBS. Meanwhile, Conrad -- who took great pride in the fact that he performed his own stunts and fight scenes -- suffered a head injury during the filming of Season 3 after a 14-foot fall from a chandelier onto a cement floor.  In addition, Martin fractured a leg and suffered a serious heart attack that sidelined him for several Season 4 installments (his shoes were filled temporarily by characters played by Charles Aidman, William Schallert, Alan Hale, Jr and John Williams).

"The Wild Wild West" was canceled by CBS after Season 4 in the midst of debates over television violence after the assassinations of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy in 1968. A decade later, Conrad and Martin reprised their roles as West and Gordon in the CBS made-for-television movies "The Wild Wild West Revisited" and "More Wild Wild West."

In 1999, Conrad made headlines by criticizing the casting of the African-American rapper-turned-actor Will Smith for "Wild Wild West," a big-budget screen version of the TV series. The movie version, directed by Barry Sonnenfeld (the "Men in Black" series) and co-starring Kevin Kline as Gordon, was a critical and commercial disappointment.

In the late 1970s, Conrad parlayed his tough-guy image into a series of commercials for Energizer Batteries. The ads' tag line: "I dare you to knock this off."

 

 

 

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Robert Conrad played the police chief on Moving Violations. He only worked a day. I just remember on a chaotic set, he was super professional, courteous but no nonsense. In a further nod to his show-biz saavy he requested his role be uncredited.
 
5:53 PM · Feb 8, 2020·Twitter for iPhone
That cold blooded opening to #WildWildWest! Yep old enough to remember that show. 👵🏾 I used to love me some James T. West! Awesome charismatic actor! Rest In Peace, Robert Conrad
 
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7:57 PM · Feb 8, 2020 from Los Angeles, CA·Twitter for iPhone

 

 

Wonder will he get a final send off in that WWW train...

EYB9YcqkG4WaJqjiNzgda4_NJnnPtd6sQa2HOORf

 

..the way they did Lincoln? 

59463604e315b.image.jpg

 

;)

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2 minutes ago, hamradio said:

..the way they did Lincoln? 

59463604e315b.image.jpg

 

;)

There were Wendy's franchises in 1865?

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1 minute ago, hamradio said:

Guess you never heard of funeral trains.  :huh:

Another one who doesn't know sarcasm when he reads it.🤥

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Man, I loved that Wild Wild West especially when I was a kid.  I liked Baa Baa Black Sheep too! 

I have a high opinion of ROSS MARTIN as well. 

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3 hours ago, jakeem said:

Maybe the original version was too wishy washy. Were they trying to say that West's sexual attraction was so potent, he could make a woman think twice about killing him?

See the source image

I always took it as West was such a chick magnet that one kiss knocked her over. Why they changed it into a punch

I don't know. Just a humorous bit of trivia. I always got a laugh out of the ending of so many episodes where West

and Gordon would have two lovely ladies on the train for a dinner and theater date. Was the Secret Service running

some kind of escort service or something?

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1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

I always took it as West was such a chick magnet that one kiss knocked her over. Why they changed it into a punch

I don't know. Just a humorous bit of trivia. I always got a laugh out of the ending of so many episodes where West

and Gordon would have two lovely ladies on the train for a dinner and theater date. Was the Secret Service running

some kind of escort service or something?

I always took it to mean they had little black books with names and addresses for every port.

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Very sad, RIP Conrad.

As a young girl, I was enthralled with both leads in The Wild Wild West-rightly so: Jim West was athletic, gorgeous & smart and Artemis Gordon was adorable, innovative & clever. Talk about strong role models.

Yes, he did many of his own stunts and like most stunt people had one or two accidents with lasting consequences. Don't forget his successful TV show Baa Baa Black Sheep, he seems to have reinvented himself as an actor. He also had a very impressive singing voice & recorded a few albums, I believe.

My favorite aspect of the Wild Wild West was the costume designer- those color schemes and fabrics Conrad wore were just luscious.

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I was out to dinner last night with my daughter and her new man, and while he was "nosediving" into his phone, came across the news.   That morning, in the "Forgotten Oldies" thread I posted a clip of the opening of the old TV show HAWAIIAN EYE and was reminded of his being on that show.  And too, I was an avid WWW viewer.  Never got into his shows after that one.  But the sadness of being reminded of my youth disappearing makes me sad too.

Rest In Peace Bob.

Sepiatone

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The Wild Wild West enjoyed enough status, certainly with Season Two, that the first episodes of that season had villain guest stars Victor Buono and Boris Karloff.

Robert Conrad is remembered for his impressive fight scenes as Jim West in which he did most of the stunt work. But I was watching just a small bit today of The Night of the Eccentrics, the premiere episode of Season Two. There's a moment when West is outside a room, opens a window to it, grabs the upper ledge and leaps feet first into the room over top of a bench underneath the window. He could have just stepped on the bench, of course, but there's more flair making an entrance that way.

It was a small moment, of course, not one of his spectacular fight scenes, but in the smooth economy of his moves Conrad made me think of the similar kinds of stunts that Douglas Fairbanks performed in the 1920s on the big screen and which used to thrill audiences then, knowing that the actor himself was performing most of the stunts, rather than a stunt man.

A lot of the action heroes of the screen relied upon the work of stunt professionals, understandably so, but Conrad was a throwback to Fairbanks when it came to the action scenes in Wild Wild West. If I remember correctly, though, Conrad sustained an injury of some significance during one of his Jim West action scenes and, I believe, had to let stunt guys do more of the work afterward or, at least, during the period when he was in recovery. I'm surprised that CBS didn't crack down more on Conrad performing the stunts himself for fear of production being held up if the star suffered a major injury.

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we've lost Bob Conrad. he could be a very formidable actor at times.

 tcm should air Will: G. Gordon Liddy but they'll shove palm springs weekend down our throats instead.

 

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3 hours ago, TomJH said:

I'm surprised that CBS didn't crack down more on Conrad performing the stunts himself for fear of production being held up if the star suffered a major injury.

I believe the network did step in and order Conrad to limit his participation in action scenes. By the way, here's a GIF of his accident while filming "Night of the Fugitives."

9KOuw-1478111666-6485-list_items-accidents_wwwest.gif

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1 minute ago, jakeem said:

I believe the network did step in and order Conrad to limit his participation in action scenes. By the way, here's a GIF of his accident while filming "Night of the Fugitives."

9KOuw-1478111666-6485-list_items-accidents_wwwest.gif

Ouch! Looks painful!

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50 minutes ago, jakeem said:

I believe the network did step in and order Conrad to limit his participation in action scenes. By the way, here's a GIF of his accident while filming "Night of the Fugitives."

9KOuw-1478111666-6485-list_items-accidents_wwwest.gif

Thanks Jakeem. As a followup I found this on IMDb::

A notorious stunt mishap on set nearly cost Robert Conrad his life and risked serious permanent injury. The shot was left in and the impact Conrad's head makes with the concrete floor of the sound stage after he loses his grip on the chandelier is clearly visible (08:37). The end of the scene with West rising to his feet was shot months later.

And on MeTV:

While filming the season four episode "Night of the Fugitives," Conrad fell a dozen feet and landed on his head. The stunt called for the star to dive from the top of a saloon staircase, catch a chandelier, and swing a vicious kick into one unfortunate guy. Conrad lost his grip from the chandelier and konked his head rather severly. He was rushed to the hospital. Unfortunately, stunt coordinator Whitey Hughes was off filming a commercial that day.

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16 hours ago, jakeem said:

I always took it to mean they had little black books with names and addresses for every port.

Possibly. Sometimes at the end of an episode one or the other would produce a little black book and the

other would try to get it away from him. But considering they spent so much time fighting egomaniacal

villains it must have been difficult to find the time to get dates. I also wondered how the regular cowboys took

West's dandified clothes. Oh no, here comes that pretty boy James West. Conrad did look sharp in those

outfits, though they seem a bit unsuited to the business at hand. 

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I can't add much more to what's already been said about Robert Conrad.  I've got the box set of every "Wild, Wild West" episode.  It brought back a lot of great memories from my childhood.  As for some of the guest stars, you could tell they were having a real blast playing the villains or the damsels in distress/heroines.  As an adult, I appreciate those performances they put in for a weekly television series.  Ross Martin made a perfect Artemis Gordon too.  Classic case of being hard to imagine anyone but Conrad and Martin in their particular roles.

I also enjoyed "Black Sheep Squadron".  It was one of the favorite programs guys on my dorm floor in college liked to watch in the TV lounge.

Another role that Conrad played (and very well, I thought), was that of the French Canadian voyageur and trapper, Pasquinel on the TV mini-series "Centennial".  I thought he had great rapport with Richard Chamberlain, who played his business partner and friend, Alexander McKeeg.

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39 minutes ago, midwestan said:

Another role that Conrad played (and very well, I thought), was that of the French Canadian voyageur and trapper, Pasquinel on the TV mini-series "Centennial".  I thought he had great rapport with Richard Chamberlain, who played his business partner and friend, Alexander McKeeg.

Thanks for mentioning this fantastic miniseries. It may currently be streamed on Starz.

Screen Shot 2020-02-09 at 4.07.11 PM.jpeg

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the three best action fighting actors on TV in the 1960s...

1. Ron Ely for Tarzan

2. William Shatner for Star Trek

3. Robert Conrad for The Wild, Wild West

:)

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doan expect to see Robert Conrad included in the Oscar's in memoriam montage tonite.

he just passed, there ain't enough time and they're slackers anyway.

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On 2/8/2020 at 8:28 PM, LawrenceA said:

 

 

I enjoyed Battle. It was different and fun.

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On 2/8/2020 at 6:50 PM, lavenderblue19 said:

Sad. always watched Robert Conrad when he starred in Hawaiian Eye. Handsome, talented man. What a lousy day and week for Hollywood.

RIP Robert Conrad

Yeah, I remember he had a pool scene in the opening credits! Tom Lopaka, wasn't that his name?

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One of today's episodes starred Phyllis Newman as an American Indian princess. In the other

Ida Lupino played a mad scientist who made a duplicate of West, fancy duds and all. I didn't watch

that one. 

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Speaking of Phyllis Newman . . . she died recently, too.  September 15, 2019 at age 86. 

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didn't even knw he went? Recall the l970's BATTLE OF THE NETWORK STARS SHOWS?

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