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Rudy's Girl

All About Music

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I like the variety of genres mentioned above, all on one page. It's fun to read.

For the last couple days I've been listening to Ronnie Milsap in my car on the way to work. He's coming to my town later this year, but I didn't get tickets. 😞

Also, just to keep things interesting, how about Mother's Finest? I love the mix of rock and soul.

 

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17 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I think I can beat that-- or at least equal it.

 I saw The Beatles at the old Kansas City A's ballpark in 64-- the summer of " A Hard Day's Night " .

And we got a special opening song--

Paul McCartney singing

"Kansas City".

What do you think of that?

 BTW-- I like Stan Getz too. I had that record "The Girl From Ipanema" with Astrud Gilberto singing. Terrific.

Great Beatles story.     As for Getz,  and Gilberto (both man and wife at the time),  there is a connection with The Beatles;

The Girl From Ipanema was the last jazz type song ,  or jazz influenced pop song, to win best song in 1962.    Who took jazz 'off the map',  that would be The Beatles who won best song in 1963 with I Want to Hold Your Hand.      From there on it was rock type songs that won (and of  course the type of pop music associated with Madonna etc...).    I.e. 1962 \ 1963 was where the major shift in the music landscape took place.

The other connection for me relates to songwriting;    While I play the songs of the era of songwriters like Porter,  Kern,  Van Heusen,   Ellington, Rogers, Carmichael,  etc...  my favorite post 50s songwriter are Lennon \ McCartney and Carlos Jobim.     

    

 

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18 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

Well I use the term ("actually") like you might for a great Jazz performer.  I am not a snob when it comes to musical taste; that's why I think 'if it's good, I'll like it!'  However, I often disagree with a consensus.  Many people think BLACK SABBATH are great.  I don't. 

Well there.....SEE?   I KNEW there's some things we could agree on.  :)   Whenever somebody put Sabbath on the box at a party I knew it was my cue to leave. Same with PINK FLOYD.  Nah, I don't hate 'em, But I never considered them as "par-TAY" music.  ;)  And I'm not done with Van Halen......  I never considered them "pop rock", but then too, they were never really high on my list.  Never had an LP of CD re-issue of theirs, and maybe a few tunes were tolerable.  And I got tired REAL quick of that "squeal" Roth way overused.  But as they did have a lot of fans and did sell out a lot of stadiums and arenas, well, you can't knock success.  

And James' assessment of The Doors is of course, his opinion, but as I seem to recall, whenever any critics or self proclaimed "music historians"  wrote or talked about the mid '60's "turning point" in music('67 again), the focus, for some odd reason, is usually on either JEFFERSON AIRPLANE or THE GRATEFUL DEAD. as far as American bands go.  And during that "summer of love" both "Light my Fire" and "Somebody To Love" and "White Rabbit" were all still concurrently high on the charts and being played on many radio stations.  And THIS young lady made a splash with this topically controversial(and beautiful)  song.....

 

And of course, 'round here(the "D")  BOB SEGER and THE LAST HEARD were THE top "solid" American rock band.  ;)   And that summer too, he treated us to...

We still love 'im here.  No matter what name his band's under.  ;)

Sepiatone

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38 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Well there.....SEE?   I KNEW there's some things we could agree on.  :)   Whenever somebody put Sabbath on the box at a party I knew it was my cue to leave. Same with PINK FLOYD.  Nah, I don't hate 'em, But I never considered them as "par-TAY" music.  ;)  And I'm not done with Van Halen......  I never considered them "pop rock", but then too, they were never really high on my list.  Never had an LP of CD re-issue of theirs, and maybe a few tunes were tolerable.  And I got tired REAL quick of that "squeal" Roth way overused.  But as they did have a lot of fans and did sell out a lot of stadiums and arenas, well, you can't knock success.  

Though I was responding to jamesjazzguitar... and anybody who put SABBATH on at a party must be hittin' the bottom of their trip.   They play better than I ever wanted to give them credit for, but those "songs".  Ech. 

I doubt anybody else would call VAN HALEN "Pop Rock", but it is.   The first album is wonderful, 1984 also great... otherwise, ...cricket cricket...

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You were responding to James.  But I agreed with the sentiment so decided to use the quote.  But then, not every band I had no use for went without their fan base of some kind.  I'm actually surprised(and a bit dismayed) that some long time friends of mine actually liked THE COWSILLS!  :o

OY!  :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

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5 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I'm actually surprised(and a bit dismayed) that some long time friends of mine actually liked THE COWSILLS!  

Now them I would call MOR Pop... 

 

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23 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

You were responding to James.  But I agreed with the sentiment so decided to use the quote.  But then, not every band I had no use for went without their fan base of some kind.  I'm actually surprised(and a bit dismayed) that some long time friends of mine actually liked THE COWSILLS!  :o

OY!  :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

That opinion on The Doors was qualified:   One could say the only really solid American band of the era.     Anyhow this POV came from the Jazz Guitar website in a discussion on Rock bands.   Now the Jazz Guitar forum is an international forum and I would say 40% of the people there are British.     So yea,  they were biased toward British band,  like I am.   The reason The Doors were singled out was for the qualify of the musicians when compared to other American bands (and the fact they have a keyboard player and everyone knows that keyboard players are generally more knowledgeable musicians,   ha ha).     Yea,  we are a bunch of snobs! 

As for The Grateful Dead;    At the jazz forum they take a beating,  especially Jerry Garcia.    This might seam strange given that Garcia played with David Grisman.   But many members view him as just a mindless "noodler" and don't find his solos to be very interesting.     Yea,  we are a bunch of snobs! 

 

 

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Here is a nice chord melody version I found on the jazz guitar website.    This songs shows the maturity of Paul's songwriting,  which is a primary reasons jazz musicians play his songs (as well as those very nice sounding melodies).

 

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Today TCM had on a short1947 film called Stan Kenton Orchestra ... and it had JUNE CHRISTY singing!  She's a favorite of mine (and replaced ANITA O'DAY).  Seeing that made me play this: 

STAN KENTON Artistry In Rhythm 

s-l1600.jpg

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21 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

That opinion on The Doors was qualified:   One could say the only really solid American band of the era.     Anyhow this POV came from the Jazz Guitar website in a discussion on Rock bands.   Now the Jazz Guitar forum is an international forum and I would say 40% of the people there are British.     So yea,  they were biased toward British band,  like I am.   The reason The Doors were singled out was for the qualify of the musicians when compared to other American bands (and the fact they have a keyboard player and everyone knows that keyboard players are generally more knowledgeable musicians,   ha ha).     Yea,  we are a bunch of slobs! 

As for The Grateful Dead;    At the jazz forum they take a beating,  especially Jerry Garcia.    This might seam strange given that Garcia played with David Grisman.   But many members view him as just a mindless "noodler" and don't find his solos to be very interesting.     Yea,  we are a bunch of slobs! 

 

 

Well, fortunately, the snobs(Ha!) at the jazz forum aren't the "end all-be all" of musical critique. (I'm again assuming you meant "snobs" and not "slobs".  As you probably meant "seem" and not "seam".  ;) )   And as you must have noticed, I stated nothing negative about The Doors, just pointed out they weren't the only American band at that time which was considered "solid".  As in my mentioning of a regional favorite(at that time) Bob Seger.  

Can't argue your assessment of The Grateful Dead, who did only one tune I ever liked.  Which was...

And ALLHALLOWS-----

Caught that Kenton snippet,  which was woefully short. But my interest in Kenton was mostly musical, not caring WHO sang with the band.  And my interest in Kenton was kicked off as an adolescent while watching THE BLACKBOARD JUNGLE and hearing this in the background while RICHARD KILEY  as Glenn Ford's teacher buddy was sitting in a bar talking about music's connection to math...  (this too oughta interest JAMES....)-----

I think it's SAL SALVADOR who's the guitarist.

Sepiatone

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3 hours ago, jakeem said:

 

19 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

The Beatles covered "Long Tall Sally".

Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels and The Swinging Bluejeans covered "Good Golly Miss Molly".

Robert Palmer covered "All Around the World( rock and roll is here to stay).

And even Blue Suede Shoes Pat Boone covered "Tutti Frutti."

But there's only one original recording of all these songs and they were all by the legendary Little Richard.

 

I could ask for a moment of silence for this great pioneering legend of rock and roll.

But that would be ridiculous. Because Little Richard Penniman was never silent. He was always loud. He created the loudness of rock and roll.

His music came on like a combination of a hurricane a tornado and a typhoon rolled into one.

 You knew you were going to hear something different that you had never heard on the radio before.

" I saw Uncle John with Long Tall Sally. He saw Aunt Mary coming and he ducked back in the alley."

 You just knew that wasn't written in the Brill Building in New York City. LMREO

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Now Pigpen, he was a slob.

 

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Y'know, some "deadheads" I know contend there were TWO Grateful Dead bands.  One PRE Pigpen dying, and the other AFTER his death.  

I never really noticed any big difference.

Sepiatone

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Y'know, some "deadheads" I know contend there were TWO Grateful Dead bands.  One PRE Pigpen dying, and the other AFTER his death.  

I never really noticed any big difference.

Sepiatone

PIGPEN is an early inductee of the so-called 27 Club.  I can understand Deadheads feeling the way they do, he was a founding member.  I've never owned a DEAD record (no pun intended). 

CONNIE CONVERSE How Sad, How Lovely - I listen to her all day long.  Bare bones, her and her guitar, errors, background noise, amateur tapes.  You'll like her if you like sweet tunes and honest poetry that uses all kinds of FOLK tropes, yet, somehow, she was truly unique (even strange).  Lovely tunes, touching insights, funny and sad stories.  Then she gets Hokey-tropey; still fun.  Then, deep, bare, heartbreaking, disturbing, frightening.  Highly recommended, but not for depressive personalities.  Her honesty is embarrassing, child-like, pure.  Really, WOW

 

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Pigpen wrote very few of the Dead's songs, so in that respect he wouldn't be missed. I like the late 1960s

to early 1970s version of the band. That coincides with Pigpen's tenure, but I think that is more coincidental

than anything else. Pigpen was mostly a booze hound while the others were druggies.

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THE ROLLING STONES  Exile On Main Street (my favorite STONES).  I've got to say, I haven't heard a STONES album I don't like. 

 

R-375854-1449530370-7918.jpeg.jpg

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48 minutes ago, Rudy's Girl said:

 

"'Catch a Wave' and you're sitting on top of the world." I love this song because it's from Brian Wilson's and The Beach Boys "Surfer Girl " album, their third album in 1963. Of course, Mike Love wrote the lyrics.

Brian liked Jan and Dean and he gave them a number one song in 1963 called "Surf City"--" two girls for every boy" and Jan wrote those lyrics.

When Brian retooled "Catch a Wave "and made it" Sidewalk Surfing", his car music Lyricist Roger Christian wrote the lyrics for it. 

And Brian and Roger also retooled "Surf City", along with Jan and made it "Drag City" for Jan and Dean as well.

Brian Wilson was generous with his output because he had so much  talent and creativity. A lot like Lennon and McCartney, Brian wasn't afraid to share his music with others Within his musical proximity.

 

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I used to confuse Jan and Dean with The Beach Boys when I heard them on the radio. I know better now. I saw the movie a while back which introduced me to a lot of their songs.

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11 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

THE ROLLING STONES  Exile On Main Street (my favorite STONES).  I've got to say, I haven't heard a STONES album I don't like. 

 

IMHO there's not enough on each LP after EXILE that's good enough to warrant buying the whole LP.   But going on to other things....

I haven't heard anything else from this guy( Paul McCartney's younger brother) and I didn't think it was all that bad......

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

IMHO there's not enough on each LP after EXILE that's good enough to warrant buying the whole LP. 

I listen to all of the STONES '70s albums and I like them.  Some Girls and Tattoo You are both especially good. 

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Uh.......TATTOO YOU is '80's, ain't it?  ;) 

But since my posting a tune from THIS as a facetious Mother's Day tribute, I've been listening to it a lot lately.  I even have the scratchy old vinyl I bought in an obscure Detroit record store in '67,  and was surprised to discover it was already a year old!

Surely changed my life.  And direction of music appreciation. Two of my buddies went to see them at Detroit's Ford Auditorium in Dec. '67.  I was supposed to go with them, but was waylaid by the flu.  :(   They said it was great!

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Uh.......TATTOO YOU is '80's, ain't it?

Yes, 1981... their last GREAT album : just about all of which was in the can.  I do think of it as part of that STONES '70s era, along with Emotional Rescue ...

2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Surely changed my life.  And direction of music appreciation.

I only listen to Uncle Meat...  ZAPPA solo?  Hot Rats... 

 

I'm in the mood for the greatest of the Girl Groups : THE SHIRELLES ... all these years later, the only Girl Group I actively dislike is... THE SUPREMES !  I make no sense (I admire DIANA ROSS, and she was the least of the singing talent in that group)!   

R-3362486-1567857946-8779.jpeg.jpg

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I didn't get Exile when it first came out, but I figured I'd get it soon. Then a few years passed and I

still figured I'd buy it. Well now it's out in CD. I should probably get it. Now I've kind of lost interest.

The last album of theirs I bought was Emotional Rescue. Over and out. 

 

 

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21 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

Yes, 1981... their last GREAT album : just about all of which was in the can.  I do think of it as part of that STONES '70s era, along with Emotional Rescue ...

I only listen to Uncle Meat...  ZAPPA solo?  Hot Rats... 

 

I'm in the mood for the greatest of the Girl Groups : THE SHIRELLES ... all these years later, the only Girl Group I actively dislike is... THE SUPREMES !  I make no sense (I admire DIANA ROSS, and she was the least of the singing talent in that group)!   

R-3362486-1567857946-8779.jpeg.jpg

UNCLE MEAT was the Mother's 5th LP.  HOT RATS was Zappa's first solo effort.  I usually considered anything after that as Zappa solos, as the personnel was always changing, rotating and never constant.  But, as STEELY DAN did shortly become just Fagen and Becker with an ever changing collection of contemporaries and well known session men,  Calling all those later Zappa LPs MOTHERS albums works for some I suppose.

Didn't like THE SUPREMES, eh?  Well, I know some who would call that un-American.  ;)  Really, There were about only two(maybe) tunes of their's I liked, and too, I always thought FLORENCE BALLARD should have been the lead, as I thought she had the better voice and was much better looking than Ross.  And of course.....

We can't discuss girl groups and MOTOWN without mentioning

OR( and MARTHA REEVES would by 2005 become a Detroit city councilwoman)

And worry not.  I loved(and still love) THE SHIRELLES too.  :) 

Sepiatone

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