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4 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I don't know about the amount of his consumption. I think hashish was his go to drug. 

The case of Gustave Flaubert is somewhat ambiguous. He likely died of a cerebral

hemorrhage, as far as the scanty available evidence shows. He was also in poor

general health and was overweight. Maybe syphilis was a contributing factor,

but maybe it wasn't.

 Many people who actually die of of AIDS or cancer, for example, have the last  medical problem that they succumb to on their death certificate, rather than the terminal disease which actually killed them, like a heart attack, pneumonia or organ failure excetera.

But getting back to what we were actually discussing.

Artists do tend to exaggerate certain qualities or fictions in their life in order to promote an image that benefits them in their work. I believe that was the case with  Baudelaire.

Baudelaire made a living translating Edgar Allan Poe.

Now Poe would be an artist who would not have to exaggerate his substance abuse because he was indeed a pathetic alcoholic.

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2 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Linda did move up from the triangle

to the tambourine. Practice, practice, practice. 

She still kicks Yoko's butt.

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14 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Michael Jackson wasn't on the  "Ebony /Ivory" record from "The Tug of War" album --

if that's what you're referring to.

 It was Stevie Wonder.

I believe Paul McCartney had several duets with Michael Jackson, cuz I've seen some videos. But I don't think they did a complete album together. When they were working on some of this music or the videos, that's when Michael Jackson got the information he needed to steal the Beatle music.

That's right.  Maybe the record with  JACKSON was "Say, Say, Say".  I like that even less, but you get what I mean.  I saw PAUL discuss his own foolishness trusting his "friend". 

Say_Say_Say_(album_cover_art).jpg

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2 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

That's right.  Maybe the record with  JACKSON was "Say, Say, Say".  I like that even less, but you get what I mean.  I saw PAUL discuss his own foolishness trusting his "friend". 

Say_Say_Say_(album_cover_art).jpg

The whole thing really ticked me off too.

( I originally used another word other than ticked, a word we used in high school years ago, but the auto censor wouldn't take it.:wacko:)

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

The whole thing really ticked me off too.

PAUL gave JACKSON the idea of buying the BEATLES catalog inadvertently.  He characterized their conversation as two friends swapping notes and the older friend offering advice to the younger.  Every time I hear a BEATLES tune in a commercial I think "Well the JACKSON family just made more money..." 

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24 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

PAUL gave JACKSON the idea of buying the BEATLES catalog inadvertently.  He characterized their conversation as two friends swapping notes and the older friend offering advice to the younger.  Every time I hear a BEATLES tune in a commercial I think "Well the JACKSON family just made more money..." 

Sony has owned the rights since 2016.   (but they had to pay the Jackson estate 750 million).

Paul has sued Sony in 2018 to get rights back to songs that have exceeded the 2 28 year copyrights.     It is my understanding that suit is still in the courts.

 

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53 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

PAUL gave JACKSON the idea of buying the BEATLES catalog inadvertently.  He characterized their conversation as two friends swapping notes and the older friend offering advice to the younger.  Every time I hear a BEATLES tune in a commercial I think "Well the JACKSON family just made more money..." 

Well I'll say this much for the Jackson family. They didn't sell their son's Legendary Musical Heritage for a song and a dance.

And that's exactly what Murry Wilson did to Brian Wilson.

He sold the entire Beach Boy catalog for a few hundred thousand dollars.

Murry ran The Beach Boys music publishing company Sea of Tunes.  Brian believed his father  had forged his signature for the sale.

In the 90s Brian finally went to court and I think he got 10 million dollars.

But Murry had also cheated Mike Love ,who wrote the lyrics for most of the Beach Boys hits, by not putting his name on the records or sheet music. 

Mike had also trusted Murry's handling of the song catalog because Murry was his uncle.

In the end I think Mike got 5 million after suing Brian.

But those two toxic dads from those two great musical families obviously must have done something right.;)

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43 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

I really like a couple of songs that Yoko did in Double Fantasy-- very opposite:

"Give Me Something" and "I'm Your Angel".

I like Double Fantasy for the strong LENNON songs.  YOKO?  Oh no...

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18 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

 Many people who actually die of of AIDS or cancer, for example, have the last  medical problem that they succumb to on their death certificate, rather than the terminal disease which actually killed them, like a heart attack, pneumonia or organ failure excetera.

But getting back to what we were actually discussing.

Artists do tend to exaggerate certain qualities or fictions in their life in order to promote an image that benefits them in their work. I believe that was the case with  Baudelaire.

Baudelaire made a living translating Edgar Allan Poe.

Now Poe would be an artist who would not have to exaggerate his substance abuse because he was indeed a pathetic alcoholic.

I read a biography of Baudelaire in college many years ago. I think it was the one by Enid Starkie. While

there might have been a bit of exaggeration, it was clear he led what some people might call a dissolute

life. So the image certainly had a basis in his real life, even if it was not totally congruent with his writings.

Add in Rimbaud and Verlaine and little exaggeration is needed to show they led fairly bizarre lives.

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17 hours ago, Rudy's Girl said:

She still kicks Yoko's butt.

I don't know. Yoko did write and record her own songs, though she never became popular and some

of her tunes are pretty good. Linda never did that, so I give the nod to Yoko.

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13 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I don't know. Yoko did write and record her own songs, though she never became popular and some

of her tunes are pretty good. Linda never did that, so I give the nod to Yoko.

In all of these years I have never pondered the question of who was the better musician,   Linda or Yoko.

I don't think I'll do so now!

 

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9 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I read a biography of Baudelaire in college many years ago. I think it was the one by Enid Starkie. While

there might have been a bit of exaggeration, it was clear he led what some people might call a dissolute

life. So the image certainly had a basis in his real life, even if it was not totally congruent with his writings.

Add in Rimbaud and Verlaine and little exaggeration is needed to show they led fairly bizarre lives.

I don't think I would quite put Baudelaire in the same category as Rimbaud and Verlaine because of the violence involved in their relationship.

But Baudelaires relationship with a mixed race black woman at the time would certainly be considered as taboo as Rimbaud and Verlaine's homosexual one.

And all three of them did come to a bad end-- but through it all Baudelaire maintained more social prominence because of his mother's marriage to a Napoleonic officer and because he was a close friend of Louis -Napoleon's wife.

However, in the end he did have to flee to Belgium to avoid arrest after the condemnation of " Les fleurs du mal" and only came back on a stretcher as a Madman dying from syphilis.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

In all of these years I have never pondered the question of who was the better musician,   Linda or Yoko.

I don't think I'll do so now!

 

I haven't spent a lot of time on the question either. I don't know if either one was a musician, i.e. someone

who played an instrument with competence. But Yoko did write and record songs, whereas Linda didn't,

as far as I know. 

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3 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I don't think I would quite put Baudelaire in the same category as Rimbaud and Verlaine because of the violence involved in their relationship.

But Baudelaires relationship with a mixed race black woman at the time would certainly be considered as taboo as Rimbaud and Verlaine's homosexual one.

And all three of them did come to a bad end-- but through it all Baudelaire maintained more social prominence because of his mother's marriage to a Napoleonic officer and because he was a close friend of Louis -Napoleon's wife.

However, in the end he did have to flee to Belgium to avoid arrest after the condemnation of " Les fleurs du mal" and only came back on a stretcher as a Madman dying from syphilis.

 

 

 

Rimbaud and Verlaine were like a lit match and gas for much of the time, and showed a violence that

Baudelaire didn't exhibit, but in other respects the three were alike. If Baudelaire took off for

Belgium after Les Fleurs de Mal was published, it was only for a short time and then  he returned to

France. During the last few years of his life he did live in Belgium before going back to France to die.

I remember that the mutual dislike between Baudelaire and his stepfather was one of the main

themes of his younger days. They really didn't like each other. The grossest thing I recall about Verlaine

concerned his mother. She had a number of miscarriages and kept them preserved in alcohol in glass

bottles. Yuck. 

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I love The Four Tops and The Spinners. I like them better than The Temptations. I think black groups back then were the best. I was just listening to this song by The Four Tops. Love it.

 

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L'ATALANTE film title was changed to the title of this song and that hit recording was inserted into the 1934 film to try and generate interest... LE CHALAND QUI PASSE (The Passing Barge)... it's on the Paris After Dark collection I've been listening to all month :

 

 

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I heard this in a short film on TCM the other night (either before or after NOTFILM)... I listen to it 3 or 4 times a day ...  

There's a lot of KORLA PANDIT at YouTube.  I love Exotica, but I have no recordings of  KORLA PANDIT ...

 

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