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Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams...captions not accurate


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There are many times when captions are not exactly accurate due to the limitations of the captioning process but what I discovered in this movie was an intentional change to the dialogue being spoken.  

I might not have even noticed the censorship of the spoken dialogue if I hadn't been especially interested in a line that Martin Balsam says when he is remembering his war experiences, in the scene where they are visiting the WW2 battlefield where he fought. The line that I was interested in was "**** on them".  I remember my father saying this in various situations when I was growing up.  He was also a WW2 vet.  Over the years I have wondered where this phrase came from.  Perhaps it's from his experiences during the war.1086638210_ScreenShot2020-02-15at9_26_27PM.png.27fd91a2a2ff0470d6b539fe54ebe4f6.png

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Let’s talk about this movie for a second. I’m not sure if the topic has been brought up here or if I saw it somewhere else but, films that totally collapse in the second half: This film is one of them. The first half is extraordinary and Sylvia Sidney is phenomenal in her role. The film moves from New York City to Europe and all the pizazz goes with it. This is also another of those films that seems to be filmed like there was vaseline on the lens of the camera like some of these late 60’s early 70’s films, ala The Swimmer, I Never Sang For My Father, The Subject Was Roses. Why were they filmed like this?

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2 minutes ago, vidorisking said:

Let’s talk about this movie for a second. I’m not sure if the topic has been brought up here or if I saw it somewhere else but, films that totally collapse in the second half: This film is one of them. The first half is extraordinary and Sylvia Sidney is phenomenal in her role. The film moves from New York City to Europe and all the pizazz goes with it. This is also another of those films that seems to be filmed like there was vaseline on the lens of the camera like some of these late 60’s early 70’s films, ala The Swimmer, I Never Sang For My Father, The Subject Was Roses. Why were they filmed like this?

Some actors or actresses requested special filters to smooth out the tell-tale signs of time.   Other times, this would be a director's or cinematographer's choice for artistic reasons.  IIRC, Norman Jewison said at a TCMFF that Fiddler on the Roof was filmed with pantyhose over the lens to give a muted, hazy  look.

https://tiffen.com/collections/diffusion

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

Some actors or actresses requested special filters to smooth out the tell-tale signs of time.   Other times, this would be a director's or cinematographer's choice for artistic reasons.  IIRC, Norman Jewison said at a TCMFF that Fiddler on the Roof was filmed with pantyhose over the lens to give a muted, hazy  look.

https://tiffen.com/collections/diffusion

Ah yes. And, I think I remember Jewison ALSO mentioning at the time that it was a good thing he didn't attempt filming this movie a few decades earlier.

And because of course, he'd had had to have used regular hose and a garter belt for the job!

(...okay okay...once again and just like in that "Jolting Impact" thread, read that punchline as Paul Lynde would have said it and it would've been a whole lot funnier, Tex!) ;)

LOL 

 

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20 hours ago, vidorisking said:

 films that totally collapse in the second half: This film is one of them. The first half is extraordinary and Sylvia Sidney is phenomenal in her role. The film moves from New York City to Europe and all the pizazz goes with it. 

I agree that Sidney gives this film life, for which she got an Oscar nomination, but I think the scene where Balsam experiences a flashback of his war experiences in the second half is worth seeing similar to Man In The Gray Flannel Suit Save The Tiger or even the flashbacks in MadMen of Donald Draper's experiences in the Korean War.  As horrible as war must be I have read that some veterans feel that it is also the most intense and exciting experiences of their lives.  Best of times worst of times.

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