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mr6666

Films in 2020.......

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‘Call of the Wild’ Review: Harrison Ford’s Digital-Dog Day Afternoon

 

New version of Jack London’s classic man-meets-dog adventure digitizes its canine hero—and loses something vital in the process

"Maybe it’s a sign of times that Harrison Ford is sharing a screen with a digital dog. Why use a real canine when a computer can make certain that a pixelated pup performs according to SAG rules and not his actual nature? You can hear the voices of future filmmakers, echoing throughout the Hollywood Hills: “Get more feeling into the mutt’s eyes.” “Make him run faster than a real dog can!” That’s the case in The Call of the Wild, the umpteenth screen version of Jack London’s classic 1903 adventure novel .........

Luckily, Ford is at his droll, grumpy-old-man best, so he can do his own acting without having his emotions computer generated. At least for now.....

director Chris Sanders makes his live-action debut in a film that too often feels like a cartoon in the manner of his previous films Lilo & Stitch, How to Train Your Dragon and The Croods. It’s understandable that you wouldn’t want to put an actual dog in scenes that require a dangerous underwater rescue and an escape from a life-crushing avalanche. But something is missing here. .....

the feeling persists that a real dog could have closed the emotional gap that technology puts between illusion and reality (last year’s photorealistic take on The Lion King had the same distancing problem). Digital slight-of-hand makes a poor substitute for all things bright and beautiful. Faking it is no answer to Jack London’s call of the wild — or an audience’s call for astonishment.........

https://www.rollingstone.com/movies/movie-reviews/call-of-the-wild-movie-review-harrison-ford-954147/

:(

-Disappointing.........

Enough already with director's obsession w/UNNECESSARY  CGI characters & Location  creation!!

are they CHEAP, LAZY or What??

:blink:

 

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33 minutes ago, mr6666 said:

It’s understandable that you wouldn’t want to put an actual dog in scenes that require a dangerous underwater rescue and an escape from a life-crushing avalanche. But something is missing here. .....

I think this says it all. They would be under the microscopic eye of all animal right activists, even if the animals are far from danger in reality.

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okay, that may justify CGI in those 2 scenes..........

but what about the REST of the movie??

NO talented, trainable DOGS available??

<_<

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4 hours ago, mr6666 said:

okay, that may justify CGI in those 2 scenes..........

but what about the REST of the movie??

NO talented, trainable DOGS available??

<_<

giphy.gif

I wouldn't even mind the CGI if it wasn't so fake looking.

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22 hours ago, mr6666 said:

okay, that may justify CGI in those 2 scenes..........

but what about the REST of the movie??

NO talented, trainable DOGS available??

<_<

giphy.gif

<_<

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17 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Is is saddening to see a film about Jean Seburg get so many bad reviews...... It's polling below 40% on Rotten Tomatoes....

There might be a political reason for getting bad reviews as it's a political movie and everything is so divided nowadays. Have you seen the film yet? 

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We're two months into 2020 and I still haven't seen anything released this year.

My local 6-screen theater is still showing Jumanji: The Next Level, which has been playing since December 13th. :unsure:

The local lineup is JumanjiSonic the Hedgehog, Birds of Prey/Harley QuinnFantasy IslandThe Photograph, and Call of the Wild. 😴

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On 2/22/2020 at 2:02 PM, LawrenceA said:

We're two months into 2020 and I still haven't seen anything released this year.

My local 6-screen theater is still showing Jumanji: The Next Level, which has been playing since December 13th. :unsure:

The local lineup is JumanjiSonic the Hedgehog, Birds of Prey/Harley QuinnFantasy IslandThe Photograph, and Call of the Wild. 😴

If we are comparinmg small town lineups, the ones here in my town are Sonic the Hedgehog, Birds of Prey, Call of the Wild, Doolittle, The Turning, and Downhill. Nothing to get jazzed about. Though it is tempting to go to Call of the Wild or Downhill, just to see what people's reactions are to no longer seeing the Fox name on the famed logo.

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13 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

If we are comparinmg small town lineups, the ones here in my town are Sonic the Hedgehog, Birds of Prey, Call of the Wild, Doolittle, The Turning, and Downhill. Nothing to get jazzed about. Though it is tempting to go to Call of the Wild or Downhill, just to see what people's reactions are to no longer seeing the Fox name on the famed logo.

I don't think it's just small town lineups. These seem to be the same bunch of films showing in most Century Theaters at the moment. What a dismal lineup!

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https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/03/02/watching-the-call-of-the-wild-with-an-audience-of-dogs

WATCHING “THE CALL OF THE WILD” WITH AN AUDIENCE OF DOGS

The opportunity to see a pug fall into a bucket of popcorn doesn’t come along that often, and you should grab it with both paws.

February 21, 2020

The hero of the movie, as of the novel, is Buck, a cross between a St. Bernard and what London describes as a “Scotch shepherd,” presumably a fervid Presbyterian. Buck, a family pet in California, is kidnapped and sold, learns the ropes of pulling a sled in the frozen North, and winds up as the free-running master of himself—“a thing that preyed, living on the things that lived.” Such was the template laid down on the page, and, by and large, it’s faithfully followed onscreen. The one major tweak, introduced by the writer, Michael Green, and the director, Chris Sanders, involves the demeanor of Hal (Dan Stevens), a greenhorn who assumes brief ownership of Buck. In the book, he is cruel but useless; in the film he becomes a villain so melodramatic, with his bristling mustache, his lunatic stare, and his suit of scarlet plaid, that Chaplin would have refused him entry to “The Gold Rush.”

 

Then, there is Harrison Ford. When I first saw his name on the poster for “The Call of the Wild,” I didn’t know whether he would be playing John Thornton, the kindly adventurer who takes Buck under his wing, or Buck himself. One thing’s for certain: Ford is indisputably the shaggier dog. His beard would be the envy of any husky, and, as befits his growl, he serves as the narrator, too, intoning the sort of gee-whiz buildup (“Skagway, Alaska, gateway to the Yukon”) that I associate with old travelogues on TV. Alas, poor Thornton is saddled with a maudlin backstory, about a son of his who died and a marriage that collapsed. Isn’t there enough mushing in this tale already? Don’t the filmmakers realize that Ford can supply the necessary sorrow with his gaze and his voice alone? Compare Robert Redford, in “All Is Lost” (2013), as another lonely grump; he never revealed what private storms had driven him to sea, as a solo yachtsman, and he was right not to. It was the quest that counted. The rest was not our business.

What really stifles this “Call of the Wild,” oddly enough, is Buck. In previous versions (with Clark Gable as Thornton, say, in 1935, or Charlton Heston, in 1972), dogs were played by dogs. Their agents wouldn’t have it any other way. The newfangled Buck, however, is unreal, from tail tip to snout; the fangling was done by computer, though Terry Notary—recently seen in “The Square” (2017), mimicking a crazed ape—provided a visual blueprint, performing Buckishly alongside Ford. The result is remarkable, yet it’s still a hairbreadth away from credible, and I reckon that the pooches in the cinema could tell the difference. They could spy a big Buck, and they could hear the rustle of his digital fur, but they couldn’t smell him. Maybe that’s why they kept so quiet.

---

The fact that the new Jane Austen adaptation is titled not “Emma” but “Emma.” should be taken, I imagine, as a punctuational joke about period drama. The script is by Eleanor Catton, the author of “The Luminaries,” and the director is Autumn de Wilde. Until now, she has been famed for her music videos and her photographs of bands, including Death Cab for Cutie. Ideal training for the world of Regency England.

Anya Taylor-Joy plays Emma Woodhouse, “handsome, clever, and rich.” At the mellow age of twenty-one, Emma is an old hand at both scrutinizing and choreographing the romantic endeavors of other people. Or so she likes to think, though her neighbor, senior, and friend Mr. Knightley (Johnny Flynn) would beg to differ. To him, she is a meddler. No good, he believes, will come of her intrusions, especially in the case of Harriet Smith (Mia Goth), a young lady of nice comportment but unknown parentage. Guided, or misguided, by Emma, Harriet spurns the hand of a mere farmer and aims for seemlier targets. There is Mr. Elton (Josh O’Connor), the local vicar, who, like Mr. Collins, in “Pride and Prejudice,” reminds us that Austen could, for the daughter of a rector, be withering about men of God; Frank Churchill (Callum Turner), an incoming cad with thin eyes, beneath whose layers of waistcoat lurks either a heart of flint or, more likely, no heart at all; and even, yes, Knightley himself.

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https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2020/02/17/watc-f17.html

HBO’s Watchmen: Alternative history that ignores the meaning of the 1921 Tulsa massacre

By Tim Avery
17 February 2020

HBO’s Watchmen (directed by Damon Lindelof) is a sequel to the comic book of the same name written by Alan Moore, illustrated by Dave Gibbons and published in twelve issues from 1986 to 1987. In the alternate history established by the comic, the publication of the first Superman comic in 1938 inspired a wave of real-life costumed vigilantes.

Three decades later, we learn that the administration of former US president Richard Nixon was able to win the Vietnam War with the aid of superheroes. Instead of resigning after a chain of events flowing from popular hostility to the war, Nixon abolished presidential term limits. By 2019, Vietnam has been incorporated as an American state, and actor Robert Redford has been president for seven terms.

image.jpg?rendition=image480Tim Blake Nelson and Regina King in Watchmen

In Tulsa, Oklahoma, a militant white-supremacist group called the Seventh Kavalry has declared war on the local police force. After the Kavalry murders nearly every police officer in Tulsa in an incident known as the “White Night,” new police are recruited on the basis that they will be allowed to wear masks or adopt costumed personas to protect their identities.

The Kavalry, apparently incensed by decades of “liberal” rule under the Redford administration, was formed in response to the administration’s promise of reparations to the descendants of victims of the Tulsa massacre in 1921.

The massacre, which the series depicts but does not explain, stemmed from allegations of sexual assault against a white female elevator operator by a young black man, Dick Rowland. Although charges were later dropped, a white mob assembled at the courthouse. On rumors that Rowland was about to be lynched, blacks also arrived, some of them armed and determined to prevent a lynching. Shots were fired and two blacks and ten whites were killed.

African Americans in Tulsa had good reason to fear that a murder of Rowland was being prepared. Lynching was a staple of the Jim Crow system in the South, and the summer of 1919 had seen the outbreak of racist violence against blacks throughout the country, often with the participation of local police, and in one case, in Arkansas, with the participation of the military.

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I'm sharing this speculative piece so you all have at least a speculative idea on what might be at the Oscars this time next year. Each film comes with a brief description, a cast list, and a director listed.

https://awardswatch.com/2021-oscars-the-best-picture-contenders-february/?fbclid=IwAR1rWYXc6v45fIQFYsbKvmuD7YIjFATSdKEl5sbJWJyFYwXsMbwuq9gxq14

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At the end of the new year's second month, here are the top ten worldwide box-office hits of the year thus far:

  1. Bad Boys for Life
  2. Sonic the Hedgehog
  3. Dolittle
  4. Birds of Prey
  5. The Gentlemen
  6. Tanhaji  (India)
  7. Tolo Tolo (Italy)
  8. The Call of the Wild
  9. The Grudge
  10. Underwater
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I saw the EMMA the other day. I would say if you're an Austen fan, you will likely enjoy this adaptation. I seem to get sleepy at some point in all films of her work and this one was no different. There's something about her stiff characters that I tire from. I keep going back, though!

The costumes, sets and cinematography are a feast for the eyes. There are also some interesting musical choices. There is folk music throughout, which seems almost out of place, yet is refreshing.

Pre film, there was an exciting trailer for THE PERSONAL HISTORY OF DAVID COPPERFIELD, due out in May of 2020, and starring Dev Patel. This one looks really entertaining and I'm looking forward to it!

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‘Hamilton’ The Film Is Dropping This Summer,

Just You Wait

Writer and star of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway musical, Lin-Manuel Miranda, revealed on Twitter Tuesday that the “Hamilfilm” will be released on the Disney+ streaming network in July.

The film features the cast of the original Broadway production of “Hamilton” performing on stage at the Richard Rodgers Theatre.

.........

“Hamilton” the film, directed by the play’s stage director Tommy Kail, reportedly uses footage from three live performances, plus some shots without an audience.

“All of the footage was used to create multiple angles, to ensure the cinematic nature of the event, without a bad seat in the house,” Deadline wrote earlier this year.

Miranda, in a statement announcing the film’s release, said the date had been moved up to the July 4 weekend “in light of the world turning upside down.” He said the movie would provide everyone watching “the best seat in the house.”............

 

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/hamilton-lin-manuel-miranda-july-3_n_5eba9519c5b68f80c04d1c29?ncid=tweetlnkushpmg00000067

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2 hours ago, mr6666 said:

‘Hamilton’ The Film Is Dropping This Summer,

Just You Wait

Writer and star of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway musical, Lin-Manuel Miranda, revealed on Twitter Tuesday that the “Hamilfilm” will be released on the Disney+ streaming network in July.

The film features the cast of the original Broadway production of “Hamilton” performing on stage at the Richard Rodgers Theatre.

.........

“Hamilton” the film, directed by the play’s stage director Tommy Kail, reportedly uses footage from three live performances, plus some shots without an audience.

“All of the footage was used to create multiple angles, to ensure the cinematic nature of the event, without a bad seat in the house,” Deadline wrote earlier this year.

Miranda, in a statement announcing the film’s release, said the date had been moved up to the July 4 weekend “in light of the world turning upside down.” He said the movie would provide everyone watching “the best seat in the house.”............

 

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/hamilton-lin-manuel-miranda-july-3_n_5eba9519c5b68f80c04d1c29?ncid=tweetlnkushpmg00000067

This was one I was really hoping to see in a movie theater.😕

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