Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

THE SWARM IN GLORIOUS PAN AND SCAN


Recommended Posts

6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

these thumbnails are neat as hell, is this something imdb does for you?

I was born in 1978 and I am fascinated by films of the 30's, 40's, 50's, and 80's; and the 60s and 90s are interesting- but for years, on largely aesthetic grounds, i avoided the 70's entirely.

my favorite films of the period still largely are PERIOD FILMS- because that is one thing the 70's did REALLY WELL- DAY OF THE LOCUST, MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS, CABARET, MURDER BY DEATH, FAREWELL MY LOVELY, CHINATOWN, THE BOY FRIEND, AMERICAN GRAFFITI- and some I know I'm forgetting, are superb films, and even some of the others I admire- THE NIGHT DIGGER, THE LONG GOODBYE, JAWS and (yes, even) DOG DAY AFTERNOON (which I SWEAR is just like a great 30's screwball comedy) and WHAT'S UP DOC? have a sort of "timeless" feel- DELIBERATE OR NOT.

I HAVE DISCUSSED this more than maybe i ought to, but in real life I struggle with manic depression and sometimes when I am feeling very very low watching SOMETHING SICK AND TWISTED AND DEGENERATE acts as a sort of ELECTROSHOCK THERAPY and "brings me back."

I am being 100% on the level about this, and as such I have seen MANDINGO and CALIGULA and I SPIT ON YOUR GRAVE and and THE WICKER MAN (WHICH I ****ING LOVE BTW!!!!!!!!) 

The film that jumpstarted my whole openness to 1970's viewing was KEN RUSSELL'S THE DEVILS (1971) which I watched UNEDITED on YOUTUBE (GOD BLESS IT) IN 28 PARTS ON FREEZING FEBRUARY NIGHT 10 YEARS AGO.  it's a perfect example of what the 70's were all about...from someone who was, of course, not around for most of them (again, thank you Jesus.) All apologies to the rest of you who were conscious and sentient during that DARK time for hair and fashion and interior design and architecture and automotive engineering.

THE DEVILS is, at the same time, the most depraved AS WELL AS one of the most staunchly, honestly moral movies i have ever seen.

Plus you get to see topless nuns grinding on a fallen figure of JESUS.

ANYHOW, LONG STORY SHORT (too late) I realized that the 1970's were something of a SPAGHETTI DECADE IN FILMMAKING, in that- for the first time and for whatever the Hell reason- people were allowed to THROW WHAT THE **** EVER THEY WANTED AND THE WALL. Sometimes it sticks, sometimes it doesn't, the end result from one not alive in the time is rife with fascination.

ps- it also looks like you have not seen THE WICKER MAN (1971) which I WOULD REAAAAALLY RECOMMEND HIGHLY.

PSS- I LOVED THE BATTLE OF CABLE HOGUE 

 

I'd also say that Paper Moon is another wonderful period set film of the 70s.... and strangely even the deliciously manic comedy I Want to Hold Your Hand, made in 1978, but set in 1964 already had a slight period feel to it. Of the then modern set films, Nashville is just wonderful. I'd say my favorite of the decade was Chinatown (a period piece in itself). And I too liked Cable Hogue a lot. Most underrated of the decade, perhaps Darling Lili, a different stripe of Julie Andrews musical that is not afraid to take emotional risks. I still plan to hunt down more from the decade, and I am sure I will find more films worth catching.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

these thumbnails are neat as hell, is this something imdb does for you?

 

Oh that is part of Letterboxd. It's like IMDb, but sorting there is easier, and I prefer it to IMDb actually. You get to log everything you've seen and you can add reviews and lists etc. They have free accounts and then also pay accounts but its really a nice site. This is my profile (I tend to give positive grades to films; 4 out of 5 is passing grade for me not 3)

https://letterboxd.com/bcarr95/

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

I'd also say that Paper Moon is another wonderful period set film of the 70s.... and strangely even the deliciously manic comedy I Want to Hold Your Hand, made in 1978, but set in 1964 already had a slight period feel to it. Of the then modern set films, Nashville is just wonderful. I'd say my favorite of the decade was Chinatown (a period piece in itself). And I too liked Cable Hogue a lot. Most underrated of the decade, perhaps Darling Lili, a different stripe of Julie Andrews musical that is not afraid to take emotional risks. I still plan to hunt down more from the decade, and I am sure I will find more films worth catching.

I've never seen PAPER MOON and I kind of don't want to at this point, entirely because of how things played out for RYAN and TATUM. I have never seen NASHVILLE either.

CHINATOWN is a perfect movie. there is not a false note, bad scene, off-read, single shot that isn't perfectly lit and framed or word of dialogue that should be changed.

edit: i have also never seen ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST.

EDIT EDIT: I also add that the years 1976,77,78 and 79 still don't hold a lot of films that I like or  find interesting, 78 especially: i think it it fair to say that there is not one film from 1978 that I even like. (not that I have many). I like the MAGGIE SMITH parts of CALIFORNIA SUITE and that is about it.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

CHINATOWN is a great movie.  It's only been in the last few years I've seen the entire picture.  After I saw CHINATOWN I realized there's a scene in THE CHEAP DETECTIVE (1978) where Madeline Kahn does a short riff of a Faye Dunaway scene in "Chinatown". 

----------------------------------------------

As far as '70s movies I haven't seen -- but would like to -- here's some:        

WHAM BAM, THANK YOU SPACEMAN (1973)  Softcore silliness. 

NIGHT OF THE WITCHES (1970)  (The un-cut version; I've seen the television version which, at least, isn't missing much).  Ya gotta love the smoke-spewing Dragon Head in the living room of the witches' mansion.  :)

THE FARMER (1977) 

CONVENTION GIRLS (1978)

TOWING (1978)  (Re-released in 1979 as  "Who Stole My Wheels?" and again the 1980 as "Fun Girls"). 

WANDERLUST (1971) 

SCREAM, EVELYN, SCREAM (1970 or '73 -- take your pick).  It starred Stafford Repp.     

SUMMER RUN (1973) (Re-released in 1976 as "Harry" and in 1977 as "The Backpack Girls").   

BLEEP (1971)  Stars Peter Brown and Jo Ann Harris later featured together in 1974's "Act of Vengeance".  Apparently this film was re-released as late as July 1979 under the title "Teenage Tease".  But, now, it's LOST. 

GAS CITY (1978)  A movie about eking out a blue-collar existence in the Pacific Northwest in the late '70s.  LOST  (I've seen a poster for it.  It says 'What is GAS CITY?' " DECENT!").  So I guess if there's still a copy of this movie extant hopefully it will be in decent condition. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

As far as '70s movies I haven't seen -- but would like to -- here's some:        

WHAM BAM, THANK YOU SPACEMAN (1973)  Softcore silliness. 

I had that on disc from Something Weird, but sold it along with most of the other SW movies I had. It was a "once was enough" viewing for me.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Maserati said:

Here's my question. Why is it in glorious pan and scan. Why is it not in wide screen and why was this never mentioned during the screening? Seems like an obvious point to address.

Don't think it ever HAD been remastered for modern times, until Warner Archive took a bash at it only recently.  And TCM doesn't always have access to the Archive.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's funny if you look back at the Variety chart or whatever from the '70s and see how many rated R movies are movies with generally adult subject matter would finish in the year's Top 10. Before most people had any sort of entertainment other than television, there were broader viewing tastes at the movies, more than just superheroes and children's films.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/7/2020 at 5:00 PM, Maserati said:

Here's my question. Why is it in glorious pan and scan. Why is it not in wide screen and why was this never mentioned during the screening? Seems like an obvious point to address.

Sometimes TCM shows pan and scan versions of films. They never alert beforehand or explain afterwards. It's very annoying.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The 70s were a very transitional period for films. The old studio formulas weren't working. Big musicals were out. Easy Rider ushered in a lot of copycat "youth" films which mostly bombed at the box office. The success of Jaws ushered in a ton of disaster flicks which ruled the box office for awhile, then they died out too. So it was a very mixed "bag" of a decade.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Hibi said:

The success of Jaws ushered in a ton of disaster flicks which ruled the box office for awhile, then they died out too. So it was a very mixed "bag" of a decade.

I've always considered Airport to be the movie that started the disaster trend. The Poseidon AdventureEarthquake, and The Towering Inferno were the "peak" of the genre, and they were all out before Jaws

I personally wouldn't even consider Jaws a disaster movie, although exactly what genre it belongs in is varied. I've seen it called a suspense movie, thriller, adventure, and even horror.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/6/2020 at 11:18 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I seem to recall reading that IRWIN ALLEN wanted her for the JENNIFER JONES role in TOWERING INFERNO (Lisolette?) but she gave it a hard pass, then regretted it.

Hence, her appearance in this joint.

EDIT: Oh, but if it had been a menage betwixt Olivia, Fred MacMurray and Joan Fontaine...the killer bees would pale in comparison to the violence.

You just KNOW Joan went to see the film and had some good cackles at Olivia's expense.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/9/2020 at 6:40 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

...and then when THE SWARM came out on VHS she would just watch and rewind the train scene while eating frosting out of the can.

ROFL!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of Olivia, I came across this bit of Oscar trivia in a 1976 New York Times interview:

 

She and Gisele, who is a second‐year law student at the University of Paris, live in the 16th arrondissement, two doors away from the private residence of French President Valery Giscard d'Estaing. His red spaniel and her daughter's French bulldog are acquainted and loathe each other. The bulldog was relieved when his enemy moved to the Elysee Palace. “Our dog has delusions of grandeur,” she said.

Undoubtedly, he is aware of the two Oscars that sit on a special shelf in Miss de Havilland's bedroom. “One of them tilts,” she explained. “A French customs man was suspicious and insisted on unscrewing it.”

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

Speaking of Olivia, I came across this bit of Oscar trivia in a 1976 New York Times interview:

Undoubtedly, he is aware of the two Oscars that sit on a special shelf in Miss de Havilland's bedroom. “One of them tilts,” she explained. “A French customs man was suspicious and insisted on unscrewing it.”

Those French will screw ANYTHING.

  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...