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Nosferatu the vampyre (1979)


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I watched the english version last nite on tubitv and ultimately found it overrated. supposedly werner herzog improved on F.W. Murnau's 1922 four-star masterpiece.
no way. first they screw up with giving klaus kinski rounded ears instead of more pointed like schreck. most of the film is pretty good but with a few things which bothered me. I guess the laughing renfield was supposed to be some half-azed homage to dwight frye but I found it needless and no way that people would not have had a problem with an employer given to laughing uncontrollably at times. Alexander Grannach in the 1922 film played Knock as a somewhat devious quietly psychotic nut especially after his master sails in. I did like it later when isabelle adjani becomes the heroine and her late nite meeting with the count in her bedroom was done very well.

we're supposed to understand that klaus kinski's nosferatu unlike shreck is somewhat remorseful and regrets his unholy existence. yeah sure, that's why he sics all the rats on the towns. the old geezer playing van helsing is about as much help as teets on a boar. so lucy decides to sacrifice herself to kinski to destroy his evil and him...but fails. she dies, kinski is staked but lethargic jonathan takes over for kinski as the new nosferatu and rides back to transylvania on horseback. I think that ending kinda ruins the film and werner herzog was a chicken *******. he didn't have the rats' behind to have kinski levitate/pop up out of his crypt or casket. man, that's half the fun of watching the 1922 film.

now I wanna see if there are any good interior shots of pernstein castle on google.

oh, and the best folklore I know of in regards to nosferatus is they gotta be somebody who was the illegitimate offspring of illegitimate parents and they also gotta be buried in dirt from the black plague that ravaged europe centuries ago.

then you get yourself a nosferatu.

:)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well it isn't actually English language. It was German language and dubbed into English.  But I have to agree with you about Roland Topor's Knock. What an obnoxious laugh. However I do love the scene where he escapes from prison and meets the Count who is releasing the rats. Knock is laughing and giddy and asks his master what to do next to which Kinski says "Go north to Riga" with a clear annoyed look on his face, as if even he is annoyed with this twit. :lol: 

48-orloff-renfield.png

"Yeah, yeah, whatever. Get the **** away from me!" :lol: 

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I found 2000's SHADOW OF THE VAMPIRE pretty entertaining, as a fictionalized backstory of the making of NOSFERATU.  I actually can't think of many remakes of silent movie classics I thought were worth the effort in both making and watching.  So I'll pass on giving the one mentioned here a look.

Sepiatone

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14 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

Well it isn't actually English language. It was German language and dubbed into English.  But I have to agree with you about Roland Topor's Knock. What an obnoxious laugh. However I do love the scene where he escapes from prison and meets the Count who is releasing the rats. Knock is laughing and giddy and asks his master what to do next to which Kinski says "Go north to Riga" with a clear annoyed look on his face, as if even he is annoyed with this twit. :lol: 

48-orloff-renfield.png

"Yeah, yeah, whatever. Get the **** away from me!" :lol: 

I read that both a german and English version were shot at the same time.

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Yes, the German and English versions were shot simultaneously.  The actors delivered their lines in both languages for different takes, although several of their voices were still dubbed for the English cut, including Kinski.  French-born Isabelle Adjani and Roland Topor were actually dubbed in both the German AND English versions, but that is indeed Topor's laugh!  Herzog has explained that he cast Topor specifically for his laugh.  Despite the dubbing, the movement of everyone's lips matches the spoken dialogue in each cut.  The only actor whose voice I am certain can be heard in both versions is Bruno Ganz.

I happen to love this film.  It's very moody and hypnotic, and there are sequences, often without dialogue, that are just breathtaking and eerie.  One is Harker's quest on foot through the Carpathian Mountains.  Another is the shot of all of the coffins being carried through the town square, and later Lucy's walk through the plague victim's revelry.  I love the original silent film as well, which Herzog has called the greatest of all German movies.  I don't think he was trying to improve on it all, just make an homage to it.

And as for Alexander Granach being "quietly psychotic," uh . . . tell me who in the world would see this guy and not think he's off his rocker? (Play the clip below)

 

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3 hours ago, Feego said:

I happen to love this film.  It's very moody and hypnotic, and there are sequences, often without dialogue, that are just breathtaking and eerie.  One is Harker's quest on foot through the Carpathian Mountains.  Another is the shot of all of the coffins being carried through the town square, and later Lucy's walk through the plague victim's revelry.  I love the original silent film as well, which Herzog has called the greatest of all German movies.  I don't think he was trying to improve on it all, just make an homage to it.

Also, since FW Murnau had to legally distance the story from Bram Stoker's book, his Nosferatu had to dig into the real European legends of the vampire as a personified embodiment of plague and pestilence.  (That's rather why they resemble and hang around with rats, bats, and other plague-carrying animals, and tend to be so contagious with their victims.)  The charming aristocratic vampire of Stoker's day only came later, after a poem that made pointed comparisons between "libidinous diseased parasites" and Lord Byron.

Herzog's Nosferatu plays up the "plague" idea more effectively, as his vampire isn't in town to round up brides, but to wipe out most of the town's population.  There's a creepy post-apocalyptic feel to the village once disease starts spreading, and creates more of an eerie effect than just Bela Lugosi callbacks.  Oh, and not to mention, the "real thing"'s a lot scarier in practice:    😦

 

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4 hours ago, EricJ said:

Herzog's Nosferatu plays up the "plague" idea more effectively, as his vampire isn't in town to round up brides, but to wipe out most of the town's population.  There's a creepy post-apocalyptic feel to the village once disease starts spreading, and creates more of an eerie effect than just Bela Lugosi callbacks.  Oh, and not to mention, the "real thing"'s a lot scarier in practice:    😦

 

I like the little speech the guy gives at the dinner during the plague scene, basically saying they're all waiting to die. It then cuts to the empty table with everyone presumably dead. Very eerie. 

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(And you'll notice, of course, that's an early Bruno Ganz as Jonathan Harker, years before Wings of Desire, or everlasting Internet fame as Angry Hitler.)

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Or his role as Virgil (one of my favorite roles of his) in the House That Jack Built.

House-That-Jack-Built-Unrated-Screening-

"You've built a fine little house, Jack."

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