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Dargo

Crushing on that newly discovered by you actor/actress who died 10/20/30+ years ago

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Marian Marsh in Beauty and the Boss (1932).

Evalyn Knapp in Smart Money (1931).

Nancy Carroll in Child of Manhattan (1933).

Lilian Bond in The Old Dark House (1932).

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2 hours ago, GGGGerald said:

I didn't care for that one either, nor Gilligan's Island. I was more into Get Smart, I Dream of Jeannie and Bewitched of that era.

Gilligan's Island is one of, if not, the worst show ever made for television. I sincerely hope I never catch another episode even by accident.

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18 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

Marian Marsh in Beauty and the Boss (1932).

Evalyn Knapp in Smart Money (1931).

Nancy Carroll in Child of Manhattan (1933).

Lilian Bond in The Old Dark House (1932).

Of all these nice lookin' ladies, I'd have to say Bond, Lilian Bond, would be the one how'd send me the most.

(...and no slayton, I didn't just say this in order to post another bad pun here...I really meant it)

Bond,%2520Lilian_01.jpg

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The pun was just an added bonus.  Yes, she was the crushablest.

So we need a pic:

41bb6CzZk+L._SX352_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

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I see I added to my post pretty much the same pic of the sultry Miss Bond just as you entered yours, slayton.

(...but who's complainin', RIGHT?!) ;) 

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47 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

Gilligan's Island is one of, if not, the worst show ever made for television. I sincerely hope I never catch another episode even by accident.

I have a family member who went to film school.  Apparently, GI is used as the prime example of how NOT to write a TV script.

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I always mention my namesake. Sorry, can't help it. I discovered him in my teens when I bought the 1936 film Camille with Greta Garbo. In the bonus material there was the 1921 film of the same name starring Valentino and Alla Nazimova. Actually, it was HER film, but that wasn't the case. But I didn't really start watching his films until the last year or so.

e3db06ca92aa24312f8d9c15e0898df8.jpg

There was something about him. Not just looks, but sincerity, and a tenderness that has never been matched. In the near 100 years since his passing, girls are still captivated by him. I'd like to see the actors of today beat that.

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Disclaimer: Not a crush

Just Wondering: Why was Claire Dodd not a bigger star?

Image result for claire doddI can't recall any movies where she was the leading lady. Am I right about that?

 

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12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Ella Raines

Ella+Raines+%25280%2529.jpg

 

Pauline Starke

MV5BMTc3OTY4MzYxMV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMjcy

 

Renee Adoree

bigparde.jpg

Thank you for posting the pics. One of these days I’ll figure it out.

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1 hour ago, Arteesto said:

Disclaimer: Not a crush

Just Wondering: Why was Claire Dodd not a bigger star?

Image result for claire doddI can't recall any movies where she was the leading lady. Am I right about that?

 

Claire Dodd was featured in quite a few WB programmers in the mid-to-late 30s. She was typically cast as a second lead, in support of higher profile actresses like Ruth Chatterton, Kay Francis and Ann Dvorak. Occasionally she had a lead in a B film, such as MARINERS OF THE SKY (1936) which was made at Republic.

She lived a very private life. After leaving Warners, she freelanced at Columbia and Universal in supporting roles. But by 1942, she left movies to focus on marriage and motherhood (she subsequently had five children). She did not appear on any television programs.

On the old IMDb boards (now defunct), each performer had their own message board. I remember reading her board one day, because I wanted to learn more about her. There were comments from her former students. Apparently in the 60s and 70s she had worked as an acting teacher at a college in Southern California. Her students said she was very insightful but also very political. She was a liberal and despised Ronald Reagan. Dodd didn't appear in any films with Reagan, but both were at WB in the late 30s. 

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8 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

She lived a very private life. After leaving Warners, she freelanced at Columbia and Universal in supporting roles. But by 1942, she left movies to focus on marriage and motherhood (she subsequently had five children). 

Thanks for the info.

To me; she was  better looking than most leading ladies...

She was interesting to watch

She played similar roles to Gail Patrick.

Both ladies appear to be smart cookies:

Gail Patrick:  Producer; Perry Mason

Claire Dodd: Family overrides movie career.

Both understood that when the looks go...so do the movie roles.

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OK.  Got another.....

Although I've seen the movie several times over the years, I must have been taking a bathroom break most of the previous times since it was only shortly after joining this site(Dec. 2011) that when watching 42nd STREET I finally noticed that knock-out blonde babe Dick Powell did the "Young and Healthy" number with.  Had NO idea who she was, and past member FRED C. DOBBS thankfully informed me it was TOBY WING,   Yep, she surely caught my eye, and I mostly watch the movie when it comes on just for HER appearance!  ;) 

Sepiatone

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29 minutes ago, Arteesto said:

Thanks for the info.

To me; she was  better looking than most leading ladies...

She was interesting to watch

She played similar roles to Gail Patrick.

Both ladies appear to be smart cookies:

Gail Patrick:  Producer; Perry Mason

Claire Dodd: Family overrides movie career.

Both understood that when the looks go...so do the movie roles.

I agree that Claire Dodd was no dummy. It didn't surprise me when I found out she had become an acting teacher. Like Nina Foch also did. These were women that were not interested in maintaining any illusion of Hollywood "stardom." They just wanted to act and teach others how to act. 

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25 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I agree that Claire Dodd was no dummy. It didn't surprise me when I found out she had become an acting teacher

I would  have thoroughly enjoyed that class.

Also, I'm curious even though she didn't agree  politically with Ronald Reagan; were they cordial with each other?

Human nature being what it is, perhaps political opposites, even in the 30s, were antagonistic to each other....

much like today.

 

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17 minutes ago, Arteesto said:

I would  have thoroughly enjoyed that class.

Also, I'm curious even though she didn't agree  politically with Ronald Reagan; were they cordial with each other?

Human nature being what it is, perhaps political opposites, even in the 30s, were antagonistic to each other....

much like today.

Not to veer into a political discussion, but I think Reagan was a Democrat in the 30s. He did not become a Republican until later. When Dodd was teaching, he was governor of California. And she working on a college campus. During that period, Reagan supported police force to control the chaos on campuses throughout the state. Dodd was probably sympathetic to students protesting.

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2 hours ago, Arteesto said:

I would  have thoroughly enjoyed that class.

Also, I'm curious even though she didn't agree  politically with Ronald Reagan; were they cordial with each other?

Human nature being what it is, perhaps political opposites, even in the 30s, were antagonistic to each other....

much like today.

 

Not to sidetrack this thread here, but this very thought crossed my mind while watching last Friday's first-run episode of "Blue Bloods" on CBS.

Ed Asner, a noted outspoken Liberal, guested on the series and played a wheelchair-bound old mentor of series lead Tom Selleck, who plays the NYC Police Commissioner Frank Reagan. Selleck is a noted Conservative in real life.

According to the plot, Asner was a former movie theater owner for many years and who was Selleck's first employer as a teenager. There's a scene where after many years of no contact with each other, they begin reminiscing about the old days and begin quizzing each other about classic movies. Asner asks Selleck to name the movies in which Steve McQueen co-starred with James Coburn, and Selleck answers there were two, The Magnificent Seven and The Great Escape. Asner then reminds Selleck that they were also in Hell Is for Heroes together.

The previous mentioned scene here is really neither here nor there in service to my point of course, but I thought it was pretty cool that the scriptwriters included it.

Nope, my ACTUAL point here was that while watching these two, I wondered how well Asner and Selleck got along on the set between takes.

However, considering that both men are pros in the industry with many years under their belt in front of the cameras, I have a feeling it went well anyway and probably got along just fine together, and with perhaps at the most a little poking of fun between them about their differing views, anyway.

(...okay, and now back to newly discovered crushes)

 

 

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45 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Not to sidetrack this thread here, but this very thought crossed my mind while watching last Friday's first-run episode of "Blue Bloods" on CBS.

Ed Asner, a noted outspoken Liberal, guested on the series and played a wheelchair-bound old mentor of series lead Tom Selleck, who plays the NYC Police Commissioner Frank Reagan. Selleck is a noted Conservative in real life.

According to the plot, Asner was a former movie theater owner for many years and who was Selleck's first employer as a teenager. There's a scene where after many years of no contact with each other, they begin reminiscing about the old days and begin quizzing each other about classic movies. Asner asks Selleck to name the movies in which Steve McQueen co-starred with James Coburn, and Selleck answers there were two, The Magnificent Seven and The Great Escape. Asner then reminds Selleck that they were also in Hell Is for Heroes together.

The previous mentioned scene here is really neither here nor there in service to my point of course, but I thought it was pretty cool that the scriptwriters included it.

Nope, my ACTUAL point here was that while watching these two, I wondered how well Asner and Selleck got along on the set between takes.

However, considering that both men are pros in the industry with many years under their belt in front of the cameras, I have a feeling it went well anyway and probably got along just fine together, and with perhaps at the most a little poking of fun between them about their differing views, anyway.

(...okay, and now back to newly discovered crushes)

Before we get back to the crushes, Dargo, I wanted to say that your comment about Selleck and Asner reminds me of Lucille Ball and John Wayne.

When Wayne guest-starred on I Love Lucy as himself in 1955, he was a Republican but certainly not as extremely conservative as he would become in the 60s and 70s. In 1966 he guest-starred again on one of Ball's sitcoms, that time on The Lucy Show. I am sure the political gulf between them had widened considerably during the 11 years between those shows. After all, Ball had once been investigated for communism and she was a very liberal Democrat. I am sure she did not share Wayne's views about Vietnam.

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1 minute ago, TopBilled said:

Before we get back to the crushes, Dargo, I wanted to say that your comment about Selleck and Asner reminds me of Lucille Ball and John Wayne.

When Wayne guest-starred on I Love Lucy as himself in 1955, he was a Republican but certainly not as extremely conservative as he would become in the 60s and 70s. In 1966 he guest-starred again on one of Ball's sitcoms, that time on The Lucy Show. I am sure the political gulf between them had widened considerably during the 11 years between those shows. After all, Ball had once been investigated for communism and she was a very liberal Democrat. I am sure she did not share Wayne's views about Vietnam.

And so before we get back to crushes again here TB, this story here reminds me of another instance in which two actors of extremely differing political views were able to put that all aside and work together...and no I'm not going to mention the close friendship between Fonda and Stewart here.

Supposedly, Kate Hepburn a noted outspoken Liberal, got along very well with arch-Conservative Adolphe Menjou during the filming of Capra's State of the Union back in late-'40s.

(...but now back to crushes, okay?) ;)

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6 minutes ago, Dargo said:

And so before we get back to crushes again here TB, this story here reminds me of another instance in which two actors of extremely differing political views were able to put that all aside and work together...and no I'm not going to mention the close friendship between Fonda and Stewart here.

Supposedly, Kate Hepburn a noted outspoken Liberal, got along very well with arch-Conservative Adolphe Menjou during the filming of Capra's State of the Union back in late-'40s.

(...but now back to crushes, okay?) ;)

One more comment, sorry! 

Re: Ball & Wayne...Probably they were able to work together because they respected each other's talent, and realized they were both uniquely popular with American audiences.

As for Hepburn & Menjou, I read the opposite, that they got along during the making of MORNING GLORY (1933) and STAGE DOOR (1937) but by the time they did STATE OF THE UNION (1948) they were not on speaking terms. Mainly because he supported HUAC and she did not. They would only speak to each other when they were on set doing a scene together.

Menjou's conservative views and his support of the House committee investigations was so well known that he was cast in Columbia's THE SNIPER (1952) to ensure that formerly blacklisted director Edward Dmytryk was kept in line. I am sure Hepburn would have had even more problems with Menjou if she had been in that movie with him.

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Anita Page was an actress I only discovered after becoming a TCM regular, and I've always had a little crush on her.

Anita Page in The Broadway Melody (1929)

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Anita Louise is an actress I only started to really notice a few years back.     Warner Bros. contract player during the 30s \ 40s she was the secondary female actress in films with Bette Davis and Olivia DeHavilland and WB gave her a few "B" picture leading parts  (E.g Brides are Like That with Ross Alexander,  which TCM just showed and I saw for the first time).

She was a good fit in period dramas and WB loaned her out to MGM for Marie Antoineete.

Here she is with fellow WB actress Olivia:

Image result for anita louise images

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9 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

One more comment, sorry! 

Re: Ball & Wayne...Probably they were able to work together because they respected each other's talent, and realized they were both uniquely popular with American audiences.

As for Hepburn & Menjou, I read the opposite, that they got along during the making of MORNING GLORY (1933) and STAGE DOOR (1937) but by the time they did STATE OF THE UNION (1948) they were not on speaking terms. Mainly because he supported HUAC and she did not. They would only speak to each other when they were on set doing a scene together.

Menjou's conservative views and his support of the House committee investigations was so well known that he was cast in Columbia's THE SNIPER (1952) to ensure that formerly blacklisted director Edward Dmytryk was kept in line. I am sure Hepburn would have had even more problems with Menjou if she had been in that movie with him.

I thought I had read something years ago about how there was more cordiality between the two on the set than what one would have expected, but it appears you're correct here, as after just now checking with the IMDb trivia page for SOTU, one of the comments  reads:

Adolphe Menjou was an ultra-right-wing political conservative who had eagerly co-operated with the House Un-American Activities Committee, named names of people he considered to be Communists, and was a strong proponent of "blacklisting" - those whose political beliefs he didn't share. Katharine Hepburn was decidedly more liberal and had been an outspoken critic of the blacklist. Menjou had made several comments accusing Hepburn of being a Communist sympathizer, and possibly a Communist, which angered Hepburn and her co-star and romantic partner Spencer Tracy. Producer and Director Frank Capra was so concerned about the tension that he closed the set to the press.

And so thanks for the correction here, TB.

(...okay, and NOW back to newly discovered crushes, folks)

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I heard that actors ROCK HUDSON and ROBERT QUARRY once got in to a vicious fight; each man armed with a Meat Axe.  They chopped each other up so badly they became 'One' and were billed as ROCK QUARRY in their later film projects.  :blink:

Alreet then, back to the Crushes. 

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3 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

I heard that actors ROCK HUDSON and ROBERT QUARRY once got in to a vicious fight; each man armed with a Meat Axe.  They chopped each other up so badly they became 'One' and were billed as ROCK QUARRY in their later film projects.  :blink:

Alreet then, back to the Crushes. 

Uh-huh, and then he (or would that still be "they"?) appeared as a guest character on The Flintstones, right Mr.G?! ;)

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