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Who would you like to see honored for 2020 Summer Under the Stars?


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16 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

The Unguarded Moment (Universal, 1956) - A beautiful teacher (Williams) is protective of a high school boy (John Saxon) even though he sexually harassed her. Then he becomes a murder suspect.
TCM Airings: 1

I wish TCM would re-air this one. It's quite good. Based on a story by Rosalind Russell (using a pseudonym). 

***

So sewhite...I was thinking that both Marie Wilson and Brian Keith would make interesting honorees. Thoughts on those two?

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John Garfield

He feels like just a regular guy who happened to become a movie star. His looks certainly didn't hurt, but I think also his talent as an actor was often very subtle so that it appeared effortless. I had read before but had forgotten that Golden Boy had been written for him, but Columbia gave the part to their rising star William Holden instead, so he signed a long-term contract with Warner Bros. where he ended up being in a lot of their best-known films of the era (I think that a couple of roles originally intended for him ended up going to Marlon Brando, but that may have been on Broadway. I forget these things more easily these days). I like how he didn't mind taking a smaller role if he believed in the project - witness Air Force and Gentleman's Agreement. He wasn't exactly blacklisted, but after testifying before Congress he'd never been a Communist (his movie We Were Strangers, which I've included below, probably didn't help matters. Also some scenes in Juarez that criticized imperial powers were deleted in a 1952 re-release), his work opportunities declined. His heart gave out while he was in the home of a woman not his wife at the age of 39, and he had the most-attended celebrity funeral since Rudolph Valentino.

Given his limited body of film work, it was difficult to pick a lineup that didn't include some of his most famous hits, but I tried to include a number of lesser-known films. I am including both his Oscar-nominated performances. I'd also seen so many Garfield films, it was hard to make a list comprised only of films I haven't seen. I have seen five of these films.

Four Daughters (Warner Bros., 1938) - The dean of a music foundation (Claude Rains) has passed along his love of music to his four daughters, who are in their early adulthoods (Priscilla Lane, Rosemary Lane, Lola Lane, Gale Page). They all live together with his sister (May Robson) in the longtime family home. One daughter, Kay, has the greatest musical promise, especially as a singer. They have a loving family, though the girls continually exasperate their father with their love for popular music, while he only cares for the classics, particularly Beethoven. The girls support each other, but each has their own needs and wants, particularly the kind of man they desire for a husband. Practical but secretly romantic Emma has long been courted by their next door neighbor, an  unassuming florist (Dick Foran), Thea wants to marry an up-and-coming banker with prospects (Frank McHugh). Only the youngest, the fun-loving Ann, states that she doesn't want to get married. Their lives all change with the arrival of two men. The first is a popular conductor and music composer (Jeffrey Lynn) who's also the son of the dean's old friend. He easily secures a job at the foundation with his natural and sincere charm, which he applies to all equally. Many women he encounters misconstrue his charm for romantic interest. The second is his musician friend (Garfield), whom he hires to orchestrate his latest composition. The musician has a chip on his shoulder after he's been dealt a number of blows by life and uses it as an excuse to engage in reckless behavior. The two men make all four daughters reexamine what they think they want in life, specifically whom they might want for a husband. Right out of the gate in his film career, Garfield got a Best Supporting Actor nomination. Warners remade this as Young at Heart in 1954 with Frank Sinatra in the Garfield role.
TCM Airings: 55

Juarez (Warner Bros., 1939) - Louis Napoleon III (Claude Rains) takes advantage of the American Civil War to circumvent the Monroe Doctrine and expand  his power by helping Emperor Maximilian Hapsburg (Brian Aherne) add Mexico to his empire.  Garfield has a small role as Mexico's future president, General Porfirio Diaz.
TCM Airings: 41

Dust Be My Destiny (Warner Bros., 1939) - Embittered after serving time for a burglary he didn't commit, a man (Garfield) is soon back in jail, this time on a prison farm. He falls in love with the daughter (Priscilla Lane) of the foreman (Alan Hale), leading to a fight between the two men. The foreman, having a weak heart, collapses and dies. The convict and the foreman's daughter go on the run, as he thinks no one will believe he didn't intentionally kill the foreman.
TCM Airings: 18

Daughters Courageous (Warner Bros., 1939) - A single mother (Fay Bainter), living with four marriage-age daughters (Priscilla Lane, Rosemary Lane, Lola Lane, Gale Page), plans to marry a businessman (Donald Crisp). Out of the blue, her first husband (Claude Rains) returns after deserting the family 20 years earlier. The worldly wanderer gets a cool family reception at first, but his warm personality gradually wins the affection of his four daughters. The youngest daughter has her eye on a maverick of her own (Garfield) and is delighted when her father voices his approval of the relationship. She plans to elope with him on her mother's wedding day, but he proves to be unpredictable. Although this movie attempts to capitalize on the success of Four Daughters with a similar title and several of the same actors playing similar roles - Rains is once again the father of the four daughters played by the three Lane sisters and Page, and there's again a Priscilla Lane-Garfield romance - this isn't a sequel.
TCM Airings: 18

Flowing Gold (Warner Bros., 1940) - In the American oilfields, the destiny of a fugitive from justice (Garfield) is intertwined with the fortunes and the misfortunes of a small oil company that hires him as a roughneck.
TCM Airings: 14

Out of the Fog (Warner Bros., 1941) - A racketeer on the Brooklyn piers (Garfield) bullies boat owners into paying protection money, but two fed-up fishermen (Thomas Mitchell, Olaf Johnson) decide to eliminate the gangster themselves rather than complain to police.
TCM Airings: 29

Tortilla Flat (MGM, 1942) - A poor Mexican-American in Northern California (Garfield) inherits two houses from his grandfather and is quickly taken advantage of by his vagabond friends.
TCM Airings: 41

Thank Your Lucky Stars (Warner Bros., 1943) - Two producers (Edward Everett Horton, S.Z. Sakall) try to put together a charity show with an all-star cast, but the egotism of radio personality Eddie Cantor (playing himself) disrupts their plans. Garfield is one of dozens of Warner Bros.' biggest stars making a cameo as himself.
TCM Airings: 34

The Postman Always Rings Twice (MGM, 1946) - A married woman (Lana Turner) and a drifter (Garfield) fall in love, then plot to murder her husband (Cecil Kellaway).
TCM Airings: 81

Body and Soul (United Artists, 1947) - The young career of a talented boxer (Garfield) hits difficult terrain when an unethical promoter (William Conrad) takes interest in him. Garfield's only other Oscar nomination and his only one for Best Actor.
TCM Airings: 21

Daisy Kenyon (20th Century Fox, 1947) - A commercial artist (Joan Crawford) having an affair with a married attorney (Dana Andrews) becomes involved with a returning soldier (Henry Fonda) and must make a choice between the two. Garfield has an uncredited cameo as himself at the Stork Club Bar.
TCM Airings: 6

We Were Strangers (Columbia, 1949) - In 1930s Cuba, a bank clerk (Jennifer Jones) and an American mercenary (Garfield) assist a revolutionary group in a plan to kill the president (Pedro Armendariz), but the Cuban secret police chief (Gilbert Roland) and the dictator's military complicate the plan's execution.
TCM Airings: 16
 

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1 minute ago, sewhite2000 said:

John Garfield

He feels like just a regular guy who happened to become a movie star. His looks certainly hurt, but I think also his talent as an actor was often very subtle so that it appeared effortless. I had read before but had forgotten that Golden Boy had been written for him, but Columbia gave the part to their rising star William Holden instead, so he signed a long-term contract with Warner Bros. where he ended up being in a lot of their best-known films of the era (I think that a couple of roles originally intended for him ended up going to Marlon Brando, but that may have been on Broadway. I forget these things more easily these days). I like how he didn't mind taking a smaller role if he believed in the project - witness Air Force and Gentleman's Agreement. He wasn't exactly blacklisted, but after testifying before Congress he'd never been a Communist (his movie We Were Strangers, which I've included below, probably didn't help matters. Also some scenes in Juarez that criticized imperial powers were deleted in a 1952 re-release), his work opportunities declined. His heart gave out while he was in the home of a woman not his wife at the age of 39, and he had the most-attended celebrity funeral since Rudolph Valentino.

Given his limited body of film work, it was difficult to pick a lineup that didn't include some of his most famous hits, but I tried to include a number of lesser-known films. I am including both his Oscar-nominated performances. I'd also seen so many Garfield films, it was hard to make a list comprised only of films I haven't seen. I have seen five of these films.

Four Daughters (Warner Bros., 1938) - The dean of a music foundation (Claude Rains) has passed along his love of music to his four daughters, who are in their early adulthoods (Priscilla Lane, Rosemary Lane, Lola Lane, Gale Page). They all live together with his sister (May Robson) in the longtime family home. One daughter, Kay, has the greatest musical promise, especially as a singer. They have a loving family, though the girls continually exasperate their father with their love for popular music, while he only cares for the classics, particularly Beethoven. The girls support each other, but each has their own needs and wants, particularly the kind of man they desire for a husband. Practical but secretly romantic Emma has long been courted by their next door naighbor, an  unassuming florist (Dick Foran), Thea wants to marry an up-and-coming banker with prospects (Frank McHugh). Only the youngest, the fun-loving Ann, states that she doesn't want to get married. Their lives all change with the arrival of two men. The first is a popular conductor and music composer (Jeffrey Lynn) who's also the son of the dean's old friend. He easily secures a job at the foundation with his natural and sincere charm, which he applies to all equally. Many women he encounters misconstrue his charm for romantic interest. The second is his musician friend (Garfield), whom he hires to orchestrate his latest composition. The musician has a chip on his shoulder after he's been dealt a number of blows by life and uses it as an excuse to engage in reckless behavior. The two men make all four daughters reexamine what they think they want in life, specifically whom they might want for a husband. Right out of the gate in his film career, Garfield got a Best Supporting Actor nomination. Warners remade this as Young at Heart in 1954 with Frank Sinatra in the Garfield role.
TCM Airings: 55

Juarez (Warner Bros., 1939) - Louis Napoleon III (Claude Rains) takes advantage of the American Civil War to circumvent the Monroe Doctrine and expand  his power by helping Emperor Maximilian Hapsburg (Brian Aherne) add Mexico to his empire.  Garfield has a small role as Mexico's future president, General Porfirio Diaz.
TCM Airings: 41

Dust Be My Destiny (Warner Bros., 1939) - Embittered after serving time for a burglary he didn't commit, a man (Garfield) is soon back in jail, this time on a prison farm. He falls in love with the daughter (Priscilla Lane) of the foreman (Alan Hale), leading to a fight between the two men. The foreman, having a weak heart, collapses and dies. The convict and the foreman's daughter go on the run, as he thinks no one will believe he didn't intentionally kill the foreman.
TCM Airings: 18

Daughters Courageous (Warner Bros., 1939) - A single mother (Fay Bainter), living with four marriage-age daughters (Priscilla Lane, Rosemary Lane, Lola Lane, Gale Page), plans to marry a businessman (Donald Crisp). Out of the blue, her first husband (Claude Rains) returns after deserting the family 20 years earlier. The worldly wanderer gets a cool family reception at first, but his warm personality gradually wins the affection of his four daughters. The youngest daughter has her eye on a maverick of her own (Garfield) and is delighted when her father voices his approval of the relationship. She plans to elope with him on her mother's wedding day, but he proves to be unpredictable. Although this movie attempts to capitalize on the success of Four Daughters with a similar title and several of the same actors playing similar roles - Rains is once again the father of the four daughters played by the three Lane sisters and Page, and there's again a Priscilla Lane-Garfield romance - this isn't a sequel.
TCM Airings: 18

Flowing Gold (Warner Bros., 1940) - In the American oilfields, the destiny of a fugitive from justice (Garfield) is intertwined with the fortunes and the misfortunes of a small oil company that hires him as a roughneck.
TCM Airings: 14

Out of the Fog (Warner Bros., 1941) - A racketeer on the Brooklyn piers (Garfield) bullies boat owners into paying protection money, but two fed-up fishermen (Thomas Mitchell, Olaf Johnson) decide to eliminate the gangster themselves rather than complain to police.
TCM Airings: 29

Tortilla Flat (MGM, 1942) - A poor Mexican-American in Northern California (Garfield) inherits two houses from his grandfather and is quickly taken advantage of by his vagabond friends.
TCM Airings: 41

Thank Your Lucky Stars (Warner Bros., 1943) - Two producers (Edward Everett Horton, S.Z. Sakall) try to put together a charity show with an all-star cast, but the egotism of radio personality Eddie Cantor (playing himself) disrupts their plans. Garfield is one of dozens of Warner Bros.' biggest stars making a cameo as himself.
TCM Airings: 34

The Postman Always Rings Twice (MGM, 1946) - A married woman (Lana Turner) and a drifter (Garfield) fall in love, then plot to murder her husband.
TCM Airings: 81

Body and Soul (United Artists, 1947) - The young career of a talented boxer (Garfield) hits difficult terrain when an unethical promoter (William Conrad) takes interest in him. Garfield's only other Oscar nomination and his only one for Best Actor.
TCM Airings: 21

Daisy Kenyon (20th Century Fox, 1947) - A commercial artist (Joan Crawford) having an affair with a married attorney (Dana Andrews) becomes involved with a returning soldier (Henry Fonda) and must make a choice between the two. Garfield has an uncredited cameo as himself at the Stork Club Bar.
TCM Airings: 6

We Were Strangers (Columbia, 1949) - In 1930s Cuba, a bank clerk (Jennifer Jones) and an American mercenary (Garfield) assist a revolutionary group in a plan to kill the president (Pedro Armendariz), but the Cuban secret police chief (Gilbert Roland) and the dictator's military complicate the plan's execution.
TCM Airings: 16
TCM Airings: 21

Nice list of flims,  but I like almost anything Garfield was in;   Other films that are must-see in my book are:

The Sea Wolf -   E.G.  Robinson and Ida Lubino

The Fallen Sparrow - Maureen O'Hara

Humoresque - Joan Crawford in what I view as one of her best Warner Bros films.

and his last two;  The Breaking Point,   and He Ran All the Way.

 

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53 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I wish TCM would re-air this one. It's quite good. Based on a story by Rosalind Russell (using a pseudonym). 

***

So sewhite...I was thinking that both Marie Wilson and Brian Keith would make interesting honorees. Thoughts on those two?

I must admit I had to look up Marie Wilson. I didn't recognize her by name. I'd heard of the My Friend Irma movies but haven't seen any of them. Looks like I've seen a couple of movies she was in but I didn't know who she was when watching. I'd certainly like to learn more, especially after seeing a few photos of her! (Hope I can still say that in these PC times).

Brian Keith is an actor who always surprises me when I see him in something "new". I wasn't quite old enough to watch Family Affair during its first run but I did see a number of episodes in syndication only a few years later. And I saw The Parent Trap either on TV or in a theatrical re-release. I don't remember. After becoming a TCM fan, I've caught him in everything from Reflections in a Golden Eye to With Six, You Get Egg Roll. During this year's 31 Days of Oscar, I watched The Young Philadelphians for the first time and enjoyed him very much as Paul Newman's secret father pretending to be a family friend (even though he was only seven years older than Newman).

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1 hour ago, sewhite2000 said:

I must admit I had to look up Marie Wilson. I didn't recognize her by name. I'd heard of the My Friend Irma movies but haven't seen any of them. Looks like I've seen a couple of movies she was in but I didn't know who she was when watching. I'd certainly like to learn more, especially after seeing a few photos of her! (Hope I can still say that in these PC times).

Brian Keith is an actor who always surprises me when I see him in something "new". I wasn't quite old enough to watch Family Affair during its first run but I did see a number of episodes in syndication only a few years later. And I saw The Parent Trap either on TV or in a theatrical re-release. I don't remember. After becoming a TCM fan, I've caught him in everything from Reflections in a Golden Eye to With Six, You Get Egg Roll. During this year's 31 Days of Oscar, I watched The Young Philadelphians for the first time and enjoyed him very much as Paul Newman's secret father pretending to be a family friend (even though he was only seven years older than Newman).

I agree with TB that Brian Keith is an excellent selection for SUTS.     While the films you list are mostly his good-man roles and light hearted stories (except Golden Eye of  course!),  I really like the hard edged Keith in films like,  The Violent Men (Glenn Ford,  E.G. Robinson, Stanwyck),   Tight Spot (Robinson,  Ginger Rogers),  Five Against the House (Kim Novak),  Nightfall (Ado Ray,  Anne Bancroft),  and the Japanese noir film,   The Yakuza with Robert Mitchum.

Keith was also impressive in small roles like the Steve McQueen film,  Nevada Smith.

 

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On 5/1/2020 at 8:55 PM, sewhite2000 said:

Esther Williams

Having worked almost entirely at MGM, she's certainly been represented for this honor before. I only had two goals in mind in compiling a list: limiting the number of MGM films and specifically limiting the number of movies with "water ballet" numbers. I threw in a couple of cameos and tried to get as diverse a representation of her work as possible. I've sort of avoided her work, but I have seen four of the films listed below (two of which she only has cameos in).

I wasn't a big fan of Esther Williams either.  I only knew of her as the "lady with the swimming musicals" and I had seen her in the remake of Libeled LadyEasy to Wed.  The only reason I had watched Easy to Wed was for Lucille Ball, who was playing Jean Harlow's part.  I had also seen her in Take Me Out to the Ballgame with Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra.  But Williams' character in that film was hardly my favorite. 

However, then I watched Neptune's Daughter and I was fascinated with the spectacle of Williams' swimming films. I had also read an article (or maybe saw something on TCM?) about how the swimming musicals were made, and just the production aspect was interesting.  I watched a couple of her other films and found them interesting to watch from an aesthetic viewpoint.  I have since purchased both of the TCM Esther Williams boxed sets.

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Ann Sheridan

Confession time: much like I've always had trouble distinguishing between Brian Aherne and Brian Donlevy, I realize I wasn't really sure of the difference between Ann Sothern and Ann Sheridan. All classic movie actors need different first names! They were both in a lot of TCM friendly movies. But okay, I see Sothern was Maisie, and Sheridan was the one in Kings Row, The Man Who Came to Dinner, etc. Sorry, I'm sure this is painfully obvious to all of you. I know Sheridan is about to be Star of the Month. I'm not going to look at which films will air that month until after I complete my list. I feel sure most or none of my Paramount selections will air.

Brief bio: She was born pretty near to where I live now in Denton, Texas, about 50 miles north of Dallas, in 1915 to an automobile mechanic and a homemaker. She played women's basketball at North Texas State Teacher's College, which is now the University of North Texas, where she majored in education. Her sister submitted a picture of her in a bathing suit to Paramount Studios' "Search for Beauty" which promised the winner a screen test and a bit part in a movie. She won and was put under contract at the age of 19, appearing first in Wagon Wheels (1934).  In 1935, she had bit parts in 12 different Paramount films. In 1936, she moved to Warner Bros., where she got more of the same until she finally got her first role of substance in 1938's Angels with Dirty Faces, which TCM no longer airs. She was given the nickname "The Oomph Girl", which she didn't like, although Rex Harrison commented on her "earthiness that never transcends to blatant sexiness". She became a p i n u p girl alongside the likes of Betty Grable. She ended up in a lot of forgettable comedies, but became much adored nonetheless. She did get some notable dramatic parts, though: opposite James Cagney in Torrid Zone, George Raft in They Drive by Night and Ronald Reagan in Kings Row. Warner Bros. unceremoniously dropped her in 1948, but she quickly rebounded with 20th Century Fox's I Was a Male War Bride opposite megastar Cary Grant. In a sadly all too typical turn of events in Hollywood in those days, she found it much harder to find good roles (or any roles) as she moved into her late 30s. The Marilyn Monroes, the Audrey Hepburns, the Natalie Woods, the Grace Kellys, the Leslie Carons, et al, were on the rise, and her services were no longer in demand. She was reduced to working in tiny independent films like 1957's The Woman and the Hunter, which would be her last. She resurfaced in the early '60s on the NBC soap opera Another World, before landing the 1966 primetime CBS Western comedy Pistols n' Petticoats. She didn't quite finish the first season, dying of esophageal cancer one month shy of her 52nd birthday in early 1967.

I stuck to the unfamilar. I've only seen two of these movies: Torrid Zone and Thank Your Lucky Stars. I won't regurgitate the whole list, but Thank Your Lucky Stars with both Sheridan and John Garfield (and two dozen other WB stars) becomes the seventh movie I've put on more than one of my imaginary SUTS days.

Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch (Paramount, 1934) - Spoiler alert! This is pretty much the whole movie - A family plans to celebrate Thanksgiving in their rundown shack with leftover stew, without the participation of the father (Donald Meek) who wandered off long ago and hasn't been heard from since. A neighboring do-gooder (Evelyn Venable) brings them a real feast. Her boyfriend (Kent Taylor) arranges to take the family's sick son (George Breakston) to the hospital. The other son (Jimmy Butler) makes money by peddling kindling and takes the family to a show. The mother (Pauline Lord) is called to the hospital just in time to see the boy die. Another neighbor (ZaSu Pitts) has a man she wants to marry (W.C. Fields), but he insists on tasting her cooking first. The father appears suddenly, clothes in tatters, with just enough money to save the family from foreclosure. The do-gooder and her boyfriend get married. Sheridan has an uncredited role as a girl in town when the family goes to the show.
TCM Airings: 1

You Belong to Me (Paramount, 1934) - When a recently widowed vaudeville performer (Helen Mack) marries an acrobat (Arthur Pierson), her son (David Holt) takes an immediate dislike to his new stepfather, preferring the company of a happy-go-lucky vaudeville comic (Lee Tracy). Sheridan has an uncredited part as a guest at the wedding at the beginning of the movie.
TCM Airings: 0

The Glass Key (Paramount, 1935) - A man (George Raft) is the personal advisor, friend and bodyguard to the political boss of a large city (Edward Arnold). The son of the boss' political opponent (Robert Gleckler) is mysteriously murdered. His opponents try to pin the crime on him because they oppose the campaign he's running to clean up the city. The bodyguard risks his life and reputation to find the real killer and clear his friend. Sheridan plays a nurse. Remade by Paramount in 1942 with Alan Ladd in the Raft role.
TCM Airings: 0

Rocky Mountain Mystery (Paramount, 1935) - The heirs of the dying owner of a valuable radium mine (George F. Marion) are being murdered as a mining engineer (Randolph Scott) tries to uncover the killer and clear the name of his accused cousin.
TCM Airings: 0

Little Miss Thoroughbred (Warner Bros., 1938) - A young orphan girl (Janet Chapman) wants a small-time gambler (John Litel) to be her father. It's an early leading role for Sheridan, but I can't find any information about her part. I assume she's the love interest of the gambler. This is apparently not a Damon Runyon adaptation, but it sounds like one.
TCM Airings: 11

The Patient in Room 18 (Warner Bros., 1938) - Unable to solve his most recent case, a famed private detective (Patric Knowles) shows signs of being on the verge of a nervous breakdown. He's admitted to a private institute. He's unable to rest and relax as ordered, but he doesn't mind being there so much, because it allows him to spend time with the head nurse (Sheridan), with whom he's in an on-again/off-again relationship, the status of the relationship usually being determined by her. Besides the detective having a butler who's a known ex-con (Eric Stanley), there's a lot of intrigue going on at the institute. The only other patient is the institute's elderly and wealthy benefactor (Edward McWade), who needs a $100,000 radium treatment, according to the head doctor (Harland Tucker). Another doctor who once had money and is now broke (Charles Trowbridge) is incensed by the treatment, believing the benefactor doesn't need it and that it would better serve a multitude of patients more in need of it. The wife of the head doctor (Jean Benedict) is having an illicit affair with a poor intern (Edward Raquello) and would leave her husband for him if he only had money. The head doctor, meanwhile, lusts for another nurse (Rosella Towne). The benefactor's nephew (John Ridgley) is in deep debt, and his uncle won't help him pay, and the nephew is in a relationship with the nurse the head doctor desires. With all these circumstances going on, two people in the institute are murdered. and the $100,000 of radium is stolen. All of the survivors appear to have had opportunity to have killed one or both victims. Thus, the detective must give up being a patient and resume his profession, and even though she's a suspect, the nurse is right by his side, helping him investigate. Things are complicated because the detective and the police investigator assigned to the case (Cliff Clark) have a friendly rivalry. The case takes a turn when it's discovered the night watchman (Frank Orth) actually witnessed the murders.
TCM Airings: 8

Torrid Zone (Warner Bros., 1940) - Plagued by revolutionaries who harass his plantation in a banana republic, a fruit company executive (Pat O'Brien) rehires his former nemesis (James Cagney) to restore order and profits. Sheridan plays a card shark and torch singer O'Brien thinks is too much of a distraction to his employees. The last Cagney-O'Brien collaboration until Ragtime
TCM Airings: 31 

Castle on the Hudson (Warner Bros., 1940) - An arrogant mobster sentenced to a long prison term in Sing Sing (John Garfield) becomes a changed man when given a chance by the fair and progressive warden (Pat O'Brien). Sheridan plays Garfield's stand-by-her-man girlfriend.
TCM Airings: 27

Thank Your Lucky Stars (Warner Bros., 1943) - Two producers (Edward Everett Horton, S.Z. Sakall) are putting together an wartime charity show with an all-star cast, but the egotism of radio personality Eddie Cantor (playing himself) disrupts their plans. Sheridan is one of dozens of Warner Bros. stars cameoing as themselves.
TCM Airings: 34

The Doughgirls (Warner Bros., 1944) - A man (Jack Carson) and a woman (Jane Wyman) are just married, but when they get to their honeymoon suite in Washington, D.C., they find it occupied. The man goes to meet his new boss (Charlie Ruggles), and when he comes back, he finds three girls (Sheridan, Alexis Smith, Eve Arden) in the suite. He orders his wife to get rid of them, but they're her friends, and the room begins to resemble Grand Central Station more than the quiet  honeymoon suite he was expecting. As long as there are intruders, he declares he won't stay in the suite and that there will be no honeymoon.
TCM Airings: 22

Just Across the Street (Universal, 1952) - The secretary (Sheridan) of a toilet repair man (John Lund) pretends to be wealthy.
TCM Airings: 0

Appointment in Honduras (RKO, 1953) - A wealthy American couple (Sheridan, Zachary Scott) are taken hostage on an arduous jungle journey.
TCM Airings: 0

Postscript: Okay, I just looked up Sheridan's June SOTM lineup, and TCM is airing five of the films I picked, all Warner Bros. releases: Little Miss ThoroughbredThe Patient in Room 18Torrid ZoneCastle on the Hudson and The Doughgirls.

 

 

 

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On 5/2/2020 at 7:42 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

I agree with TB that Brian Keith is an excellent selection for SUTS.     While the films you list are mostly his good-man roles and light hearted stories (except Golden Eye of  course!),  I really like the hard edged Keith in films like,  The Violent Men (Glenn Ford,  E.G. Robinson, Stanwyck),   Tight Spot (Robinson,  Ginger Rogers),  Five Against the House (Kim Novak),  Nightfall (Ado Ray,  Anne Bancroft),  and the Japanese noir film,   The Yakuza with Robert Mitchum.

Keith was also impressive in small roles like the Steve McQueen film,  Nevada Smith.

 

I'd love to see Brian Keith as one of the SUTS designees.  He never gave a bad performance.  Really liked him in TIGHT SPOT.

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Ida Lupino

Ida Lupino was born to a show business family in London in 1918. Her mother took her to a film audition in 1932 when she was 14, and she won the part she was seeking. That picture was Her First Affaire. At the age of 16, she came to Hollywood with bleach blonde hair in 1934 and played a number of small and mostly not-well-remembered parts. About her only noteworthy role was in 1935's Peter Ibbetson at Paramount when she was 17. It wasn't until The Light That Failed (1939), also at Paramount, that she began to consistently get good parts. She got typecast mostly as hard but sympathetic women from the wrong side of the tracks. She spent pretty much all of the decade of the '40s at Warner Bros., defining herself quickly as Hollywood's leading hard-luck dame in films like The Sea Wolf (1940) and High Sierra (1941). Her tough, knowing characters held their own against the biggest leading men of the day - first Ronald Colman in The Light That Failed, and then at Warners, Humphrey Bogart, John Garfield and Edward G. Robinson. She played everything from a traveling saleswoman in Pillow to Post (1945) to a tough nightclub singer in The Man I Love (1946). She became less in demand as approached her 30s - there was a lot of competition for good female roles between up-and-comers and established stars. She opted to leave Warner in 1947, hoping she'd have more success securing good roles as a freelancer. This didn't happen, so she began working as a director, writer and producer. She co-wrote the screenplay for Not Wanted (1949), made at Universal, and when the director Elmer Clifton fell ill, she took over, although he still got sole credit. She joked that as an actress she'd been the poor man's Bette Davis and now as a director she was the poor man's Don Siegel. She continued to write, direct and act, mostly on low-budget melodramas, in the '50s, sometimes doing more than one of those jobs on the same film. She moved to television at the end of the decade and directed episodes of everything from The Untouchables to The Fugitive (both on ABC) for the next 10 years. In the '70s, she returned mostly to acting, making guest appearances on multiple television shows and occasional small parts in movies. Her final film was My Boys are Good Boys, a tiny independent production with Ralph Meeker and Lloyd Nolan in 1978. She died from a stroke while she was battling colon cancer in 1995 at the age of 77. She was married three times. The first, for seven years, was to the actor Louis Hayward. The longest marriage and the one that gave her her only child, a daughter, was for 33 years to the actor Howard Duff (I'm not too familiar with him, but late in his career, he played Dustin Hoffman's attorney in Kramer vs. Kramer), which ended in divorce.

I stuck to films she acted in, since SUTS days have always been devoted to actors, so far as I know, though she also directed at least one of these films. I tried to limit her WB pictures, since TCM shows plenty of those, but I wanted to be inclusive of her whole career. I put in a couple of her British films as a teen, though I have no idea of their availability. The only ones I've seen are They Drive by Night and The Bigamist.

I also picked Out of the Fog for my John Garfield day and  The Bigamist for my Edmond O'Brien day, so they become my eighth and ninth films that I've picked more than once.

Money for Speed (Dist. in the US by Regal Distributing, 1933) - A motorcycle speedway champion (Cyril McLaglen) has amorous intentions toward an attractive young woman (Lupino). His rival on the dirt tracks (John Loder) also becomes a rival for her affections. The first man causes a crash that leaves the second man seriously injured. The first man is banned from the speedway and takes up stunt riding to make a living. He finally gets an opportunity to redeem himself. Looking at her brief British resume, I feel like they threw Lupino into adult roles a little quickly. I know it's just a movie, but we have two men in their mid-30s trying to woo Lupino, who was 15. Doesn't mean I would refuse to watch it. Nobody thought anything about that back then, I guess.
TCM Airings: 0

The Ghost Camera (Dist. in the US by Olympic Pictures, 1933) - A photograph is taken at the scene of the murder and the camera tossed out of a castle window to destroy the evidence. It lands in the back of a passing car being driven by a chemist (Henry Kendall) who becomes an amateur sleuth after developing the film. He goes in search of the woman captured in the photograph (Lupino). When the camera is stolen from his laboratory, his suspicions are further aroused.
TCM Airings: 0

Peter Ibbetson (Paramount, 1935) - A Victorian-era architect (Gary Cooper), commissioned by a duke (John Halliday) to design his stables, falls in love with the duchess (Ann Harding). Lupino plays a vulgar English woman whom Cooper befriends in Paris.
TCM Airings: 0

Yours for the Asking (Paramount, 1936) - A casino operator (George Raft) hires a down-on-her-luck socialite (Dolores Costello) as the casino hostess in order to help her out and improve casino revenue, but his pals fear he may follow her onto the straight-and-narrow path, which wouldn't be good for business. So, they hire two con artists (Lupino, Reginald Owen) to try to manipulate him back off the path of righteousness.
TCM Airings: 0 

Let's Get Married (Columbia, 1937) - A political kingmaker (Walter Connolly) attempts to elevate the ambitious suitor (Reginald Denny) of his daughter (Lupino) into the higher echelons of politics by getting him elected to Congress. His daughter isn't interested in her hand-picked choice for a husband. He's duly elected, but she wants a weatherman/inventor (Ralph Bellamy) to be her husband.
TCM Airings: 0

They Drive by Night (Warner Bros., 1940) - One of two truck-driving brothers (George Raft, Humphrey Bogart) loses an arm. They both join a transport company. The other brother is charged in the murder of the owner (Alan Hale). Lupino plays Hale's wife, who has eyes for Raft.
TCM Airings: 40

Out of the Fog (Warner Bros., 1941) - A racketeer on the Brooklyn piers (John Garfield) bullies boat owners into paying protection money, but two fishermen (Thomas Mitchell, John Qualen) decide to eliminate the gangster themselves rather than complain to police. Lupino plays Mitchell's daughter, a 21-year-old telephone operator and an ambitious young woman who dreams of leaving the neighborhood.
TCM Airings: 29

Life Begins at Eight-Thirty (20th Century Fox, 1942) - A young woman (Lupino) lives in a New York City flat with her father (Monty Woolley), a celebrated actor brought down by alcoholism. Lame from an early age and feeling trapped in her small world, she's delighted to meet a charming male tenant (Cornel Wilde). Her father is offered the lead in a new production of King Lear, and the neighbor gets a composing job in Hollywood. For a while, better times seem to beckon.
TCM Airings: 0

Devotion (Warner Bros., 1946) - Genius authors Emily and Charlotte Bronte (Lupino, Olivia De Havilland) both fall in love with their curate (Paul Henreid) as they seek to get their work published.
TCM Airings: 34

Escape Me Never (Warner Bros., 1947) - In Venice in 1900, a woman, Fenella, (Eleanor Parker) is engaged to a composer, Caryl, (Gig Young) until she hears that an unmarried woman, Gemma, (Lupino) and her child are staying with a composer with his last name. She ends the engagement and heads off to a retreat in the mountains. There she meets and is intrigued by a man, Sebastian, (Erroll Flynn), but she doesn't know he's the brother of Caryl and the composer Gemma is actually living with. She learns the truth. Gemma demands he decide between them, and when Fenella won't commit,  he leaves with Gemma to be married. They go to England, where he begins writing a ballet. Fenella and Caryl become re-engaged, but Fenella is still in love with Sebastian.
TCM Airings; 29

The Bigamist (The Filmakers, 1953) - A man (Edmond O'Brien) secretly married to two women (Joan Fontaine, Lupino) begins to feel the pressure of his deceit. Also directed by Lupino.
TCM Airings: 16

The Big Knife (United Artists, 1955) - A Hollywood actor (Jack Palance) is pressured by his studio boss(Rod Steiger) into a criminal cover-up to protect his valuable career. Lupino plays Palance's wife, who tells him she won't live with him anymore unless he becomes his own man again by refusing to re-up for seven years with the studio.
TCM Airings: 24

   
 

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3 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Ida Lupino

The Big Knife (United Artists, 1955) - A Hollywood actor (Jack Palance) is pressured by his studio boss(Rod Steiger) into a criminal cover-up to protect his valuable career. Lupino plays Palance's wife, who tells him she won't live with him anymore unless he becomes his own man again by refusing to re-up for seven years with the studio.
TCM Airings: 24

The final scene with Ida Lupino is amazing. 

I would also recommend THE LADY AND THE MOB (1939) in which she gives a light comedic performance. She is also very good in DEEP VALLEY (1947) and ROAD HOUSE (1948). 

***

But I think my favorite performance of hers is in JENNIFER (1953). Here's a review I wrote about it:

What I most love about this film is the way we are kept off-guard about who the title character is, and why she has this power over a meek caretaker named Agnes (played by Lupino). To say Jennifer is a ghost is only half-right. Maybe it is easer to say she is a living woman or a way of life that possesses the weak. But the story maintains its hold on the viewer as Lupino's character struggles to get to the bottom of things. It plays out in spots as an unhealthy obsession. And Howard Duff, Lupino's real-life husband, who appears as the love interest seems to have his own obsession where Agnes is concerned, wresting her away from Jennifer.

If you get the chance to look at JENNIFER, and especially if you see JENNIFER twice or more, listen carefully as you hear the dialogue. The lines lead in multiple directions, and it is like the mystery only grows deeper about who and what is overtaking Lupino and Duff until they finally confront the truth about the life they live. Also, listen carefully to the music. There's a record that Lupino's character finds, that is replayed throughout the story. Plus during a nightclub scene, we are shown a man singing a tune called 'Angel Eyes,' while Duff holds Lupino close and looks into her eyes. It is clear to him, and to us the audience, that something has started unraveling.

It's a profound film, infused with atmospheric touches. And it is anchored with an extraordinary performance by its lead actress. Ida Lupino shined in so many classics over the years, but I think this one has to be her best.

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Gloria Grahame

Born Gloria Hallward in Los Angeles in 1923, she was a pupil of her mother's, who was a stage actress and drama teacher. She began acting professionally while she was still in high school Louis B. Mayer saw her on Broadway and signed her to a contract with MGM in 1944 under the name Gloria Grahame. She had a nice debut in Blonde Fever but didn't make an impression until she was loaned out to RKO for It's a Wonderful Life. She had obvious star quality and sex appeal, but was an odd fit among the leading ladies at MGM, and they sold her contract to RKO in 1947. She had the same problem there. Once again, her best work came in a loan-out, to Columbia for In a Lonely Place. She was gone from RKO by 1952 and either began working as a freelancer or under very short contracts. Sexy but insecure about her looks and appreciative of the attention of men, she had plastic surgery to enhance her lips, which became her most famous feature. The '50s were here most successful years. She won Best Supporting Actress for MGM's The Bad and the Beautiful and appeared in seven well-remembered film noirs. She got typecast as a shady but sultry lady. She developed a reputation for being difficult to work with on the set of Oklahoma! (1955) and found it harder to obtain work from 1956 on. Her four-year marriage to Nicholas Ray, her director on In a Lonely Place, who was 12 years older than her, came to and end after four years and her marriage to Cy Howard after eight. Then she married her former stepson Anthony Ray, who was 13 years her junior, which prompted Nicholas Ray and Howard to file for custody for the one child she'd had by each, calling her an unfit mother. Some people who knew Nicholas Ray claimed that marriage ended because he found Grahame and Anthony Ray in bed together when Anthony was 13! The gossip and scandal sheets went into overdrive. She returned to the stage and began appearing on television in 1960, then began appearing in some zero-budget films, mostly horror, around 1970. The marriage to Anthony Ray, her fourth, was by far her longest at 14 years, but they also divorced. Her busiest period of stage work on Broadway and in London began after this last divorce, but it ended abruptly when in 1981, suffering from stomach cancer, she collapsed onstage during rehearsals and died hours after being flown to a New York City hospital, a month before her 58th birthday.

I picked at least one film from every decade she worked  from the '40s to '80s. There aren't a lot of choices after 1960. I included both her first and last movies. I've seen four of these films: It's a Wonderful Life (yeah, I know TCM will never show it, but I like her performance), Sudden Fear, her Oscar-winning turn in The Band and the Beautiful and Odds against Tomorrow. I also picked that last film for my Harry Belafonte day, so it's the 10th film I've used more than once.

Blonde Fever (MGM, 1944) - A man (Philip Dorn) owns a small but upscale cafe on the road between Reno and Lake Tahoe. He's a heavy gambler, and his marriage is rocky. Into his life comes a waitress (Grahame).
TCM Airings: 14

Without Love (MGM, 1945) - In World War II Washington, D.C., a woman (Katharine Hepburn) and a scientist (Spencer Tracy) enter into a loveless marriage of convenience, and she becomes his assistant. Various struggles bring them closer together. Grahame only has a bit part in this one.
TCM Airings: 43

It's a Wonderful Life (RKO, 1946) - An angel (Henry Travers) is sent from Heaven to help a desperately frustrated businessman (James Stewart) by showing him what life would be like if he never existed. Grahame plays the town flirt.
TCM Airings: 0

Sudden Fear (RKO, 1952) - After an ambitious actor (Jack Palance) insinuates himself into the life of a middle-aged, wealthy playwright (Joan Crawford), he marries her, then plots with his mistress (Grahame) to murder her.  
TCM Airings: 3

The Bad and the Beautiful (MGM, 1952) - An unscrupulous movie producer (Kirk Douglas) uses an actress (Lana Turner), a director (Barry Sullivan) and a writer (Dick Powell) to ensure success. Grahame plays Powell's flirty wife.
TCM Airings: 95

The Glass Wall (Columbia, 1953) - A World War II "displaced person" about to be deported (Vittorio Gassman) jumps ship in the New York City harbor in order to find an ex-GI whom he helped during the war and who can prove he has a right to legal entry into the United States (Jerry Paris). If he can't find him within 24 hours, he'll  be branded a fugitive and permanently disqualified from U.S. citizenship. His quest leads him to befriend a down-on-her-luck factory worker (Grahame), whom he rejuvenates through  his good faith; to a jazz club where Shorty Rogers and his band and trombonist Jack Teagarden (as themselves) are playing; and to an interlude with a good-hearted burlesque dancer (Robin Raymond), who takes him to the house of her mother (Else Back) for food and rest. The climax comes at dawn in the United Nations building, where he goes to plead his case and that of all displaced persons.
TCM Airings: 2

Man on a Tightrope (20th Century Fox, 1953) - A Czech circus owner/clown (Frederic March) and his entire troupe employ a daring strategem in order to escape en masse from behind the Iron Curtain.  Grahame plays March's second wife, who thinks he's weak and despises him. Directed by Elia Kazan.
TCM Airings: 1

Ride Out for Revenge (United Artists, 1957) - When an Indian chief (Frank DeKova) is murdered in a hateful town, a sympathizing ex-marshal (Rory Calhoun) tries to stop the Indians from attacking for revenge. Grahame plays a widow who's already lost her spouse and her father to an Indian massacre.
TCM Airings: 0

Odds against Tomorrow (United Artists, 1959) - One man (Ed Begley) hires two others who are heavily bebt-burdened (Harry Belafonte, Robert Ryan) for a bank robbery. Suspicion and prejudice threaten their partnership. Grahame plays the love-starved next-door-neighbor of Ryan and his girlfriend (Shelly Winters).
TCM Airings: 39

Ride Beyond Vengeance (Columbia, 1966) - A man (Chuck Connors) falls in love with a beautiful, wealthy girl out of his class (Kathryn Hayes). Against the wishes of her snobbish aunt (Ruth Warrick), she marries him, later faking a pregnancy to win her aunt's consent. He tires of living off his wife's family and eventually deserts her to become a buffalo hunter. Eleven years later, he with a self-made fortune, he sets out to return home, only to be set upon by three sadistic marauders who steal his money and leave him for dead (Michael Rennie,, Bill Bixby, Claude Aikens). Rescued by a farmer who nurses him back to health (Paul Fix), he becomes consumed by the desire for revenge. As fate would have it, all three men live close to his former home. Matters get much worse when he reunites with his wife, only to discover she's engaged to one of his attackers.  Grahame is the cheating wife of one of the townspeople having an affair with Bixby.
TCM Airings: 0

Blood and Lace (AIP, 1971) -  After her prostitute mother (Louise Sherrill) and her john (Joe Durkin) are beaten to death while they sleep  in bed, a teenager (Melody Patterson) is sent to an isolated orphanage run by a woman (Grahame) and her handyman (Len Lesser). Taking avid interest in her welfare is a private detective (Vic Tayback). Taking almost no interest at all is a social worker (Milton Selzer) completely under the thumb of the orphanage head. Lots of unpleasant surprises are in store for the girl, not the least of which is the fact that both the orphanage head an her handyman are brutal sadists who run the orphanage like a concentration camp and the possibility that her mother's hammer-wielding killer may now be stalking her.
TCM Airings: 0

The Nesting (Feature Films, 1981) - A writer suffering from agoraphobia (Robin Groves) rents an isolated house so she can concentrate on her work. She doesn't know the house is a former brothel and is inhabited by the ghosts of dead prostitutes. In her final film, Grahame has a small role as the ghost of the madam.
TCM Airings: 0

 

 

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49 minutes ago, chinaseas said:

I would like to Jean Harlow, Kay Francis, Hedy lamarr, Clark Gable and William Powell.

Good choices. At least these people are featured on TCM all year long, every year, since they have so many films in the Turner Library.

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On 5/9/2020 at 10:38 PM, TopBilled said:

Teresa Wright's a good choice.

***

Another one I'd like to see honored is Evelyn Keyes.

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Evelyn Keyes would be a good selection.   More Columbia films!       After reading the John Huston books I like seeing the film she made during the years she was married to him.    Making movies was an escape for her from this very 'odd' marriage.    (E.g. Huston openly had girlfriends etc...).

 

 

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7 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Evelyn Keyes would be a good selection.   More 20th Century Fox films!       After reading the John Huston books I like seeing the film she made during the years she was married to him.    Making movies was an escape for her from this very 'odd' marriage.    (E.g. Huston openly had girlfriends etc...).

Someone uploaded a sharp looking copy of MR. SOFT TOUCH on YouTube which I watched last night. Evelyn Keyes worked very well with Glenn Ford, in the six films they did together at Columbia in the 1940s. 

In terms of the stuff she made during her marriage to Huston...she left Columbia in 1950, so most of what she did in the early to mid-50s was as a freelance actress. She did quite well, probably with Huston's help in the background...appearing in the classic noir THE PROWLER, as well as 99 RIVER STREET. Plus there were some comedies and adventure films. She's very good as the title character MRS. MIKE which paired her up again with Dick Powell. They had previously made JOHNNY O'CLOCK back at Columbia. 

All of these films would be great to include as part of a Summer Under the Stars tribute for Evelyn Keyes.

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9 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Someone uploaded a sharp looking copy of MR. SOFT TOUCH on YouTube which I watched last night. Evelyn Keyes worked very well with Glenn Ford, in the six films they did together at Columbia in the 1940s. 

In terms of the stuff she made during her marriage to Huston...she left Columbia in 1950, so most of what she did in the early to mid-50s was as a freelance actress. She did quite well, probably with Huston's help in the background...appearing in the classic noir THE PROWLER, as well as 99 RIVER STREET. Plus there were some comedies and adventure films. She's very good as the title character MRS. MIKE which paired her up again with Dick Powell. They had previously made JOHNNY O'CLOCK back at Columbia. 

All of these films would be great to include as part of a Summer Under the Stars tribute for Evelyn Keyes.

Screen%2Bshot%2B2016-05-31%2Bat%2B5.00.2

I meant to say Columbia,  so I edited my post.    Just having my morning green tea here in CA and  I"m not fully awake (ha ha).

 

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I was looking at the thread I had created last year for the 2019 SUTS lineup. The schedule had already been posted by now:

Screen Shot 2020-05-15 at 8.09.34 AM

I wonder if COVID-19 has affected the offices at TCM? i would think it'd be pretty easy to sit 6' apart from one another while planning a schedule... and while I'm not sure what all goes into planning a schedule, it seems that people could possibly do this at home? 

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