Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
TopBilled

Who would you like to see honored for 2020 Summer Under the Stars?

Recommended Posts

5 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Really?    Hey,  I'm not questioning what you're saying but I find that had to believe (I guess accept),   given his standing and film legacy (e.g.  likely in most people's top-5 as a supporting actor).       E.g.  TCM recently showed Pride of the Yankees.     I only watched a small part it since I've seen the film so many times,  but what impressed me was Brennan and how in this role he played it "straight".        I.e. a part that didn't really utilize his screen persona but he was still solid (of course that is also true with Dan Duryea in this film,  but at this stage of Duryea's career he really hadn't established his screen persona yet).

 

 

Yeah, most are stunned he won 3 Oscars too  They usually don't believe me  Champs of performers to date are  KATE HEPBUTN (4), D. DAY-LEWIS (3 so far), NICHOLSON (4), STREEP-(2 & 21 noms),, BERGMAN (2) & WALTER

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Really?    Hey,  I'm not questioning what you're saying but I find that had to believe (I guess accept),   given his standing and film legacy (e.g.  likely in most people's top-5 as a supporting actor).       E.g.  TCM recently showed Pride of the Yankees.     I only watched a small part it since I've seen the film so many times,  but what impressed me was Brennan and how in this role he played it "straight".        I.e. a part that didn't really utilize his screen persona but he was still solid (of course that is also true with Dan Duryea in this film,  but at this stage of Duryea's career he really hadn't established his screen persona yet).

Yes, I just verified it with the list in the SUTS sub-forum. Surprisingly, Walter Brennan has not yet had a day in August.

He's had birthday tributes (daytime schedule).

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't agree with that choice?  Ever see Fields Man on the Flying trapeze? Brennan was one of the drunk burglers singing in the basement, Hilarious role  He also played old man clementine & played another villian in How the west was Won, though briefly  There's a rumor started online he was once a klan member?

where they dig up these things???

Stanley & Livingstone & Northwest passage were other roles  my fav role of his was The Westerner-(his 3rd Oscar)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

smashed his teeth in a car crash  who do you like more McLaglen or Ward Bond?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John Mills

I picked him because of a reference on Page One of this thread, but I see he's been mentioned again just a couple of posts above (Edit: well, it was just a couple of posts above when I started typing this about seven hours ago). Father of both Juliet and Haley, he lived to be 97 and kept on working pretty close to the end, so there's a lot to choose from. The vast majority of his films were UK productions, but he'd show up in a Hollywood movie once in a blue moon. Many of the actors and actresses I've researched have long lists of day parts and extra parts early in the careers, but all his characters have both first and last names right from the beginning of his career. I've seen a few of his movies, but I avoided pretty much all of the ones of his that usually get played on TCM. Great Expectations is probably one of my ten favorite films of all time, but I decided to leave it out because it shows up on TCM pretty regularly. Of the ones below, I've only seen This Happy BreedHobson's Choice and The Wrong Box

The Doctor's Secret (Wardour Films, 1934) - A jovial con man (Leslie Fuller) is known to his friends and his son (Mills) as a traveling salesman, but he's really a huckster in a travel medicine show peddling a phony product, complete with music, a monkey and shills in the audience. The son, studying to be a doctor, interns at a local hospital where he's romancing a nurse (Marguerite Allan), but he has a rival (Ronald Shiner) who plans to expose his father as a quack and ruin both of them.
TCM Airings: 0

Charing Cross Road (British Lion, 1935) - A man (Arthur Sinclair) tells a cautionary tale in flashback to a young man (Mills) and his fiancee (June Clyde).
TCM Airings: 0

The Big Blockade (Dist. in the US by United Artists, 1942) - A wartime propaganda piece focusing on the success of the economic blockade of Germany in the early years of the war. In a framing segment, Michael Rennie and Mills are pilots who fly out to night bomb Hanover.
TCM Airings: 0

This Happy Breed (Dist. in the US by Universal, 1944) - A family moves to a nice house in the suburbs just after World War I, and we follow the next 20 years of their ordinary lives, as they experience the "usual number" of triumphs and disasters, until the outbreak of World War II. Mills plays a sailor who dates the oldest daughter (Kay Walsh), though she tells him she plans to marry a man far above her class and could never be happy with him.
TCM Airings: 9

Operation Disaster (Dist. in the US by ABC-TV, 1950) - The crew of a submarine is trapped on the sea floor after it sinks. Can they be rescued before they run out of air? Mills plays the sub commander. Apparently this only got a TV release in the US.
TCM Airings: 0

Hobson's Choice (Dist. in the US by United Artists, 1954) - A widowed successful bootmaker (Charles Laughton) is a tyrannical father to three daughters (Brenda de Banzie, Daphne Anderson, Prunella Scales). They would like to leave him by getting married, but he won't give his approval because tradition dictates he'd have to pay out settlements. Mills plays the man who eventually becomes the groom of the oldest daughter.
TCM Airings: 12

Town on Trial (Columbia, 1957) - At a local tennis club in a posh London suburb, an attractive, flirty young woman (Margaretta Scott) is murdered, prompting a Scotland Yard investigation. Mills is the chief investigator.
TCM Airings:  0

Hell, Heaven or Hoboken (Dist. in the US by National Telefilm Association, 1958) - During World War II, a British actor (Clifton James) impersonates Field Marshal Barnard Montgomery in order to confuse German intelligence. Based on real events, apparently. Mills plays the major who recruits the actor.
TCM Airings: 1 (Under a different title, I Was Monty's Double)

Tiara Tahiti (Dist. in the US by Zenith International Films, 1962) - A tough colonel (Mills) and a refined captain (James Mason) who clashed during World War II continue their personal battle in peacetime Tahiti.
TCM Airings: 0

The Wrong Box (Dist. in the US by Columbia, 1966) - In Victorian England, the fate of a mass fortune depends on which of two brothers (Mills and Ralph Richardson) can outlive the other or can be made to seem to have done so.
TCM Airings: 24

Lady Caroline Lamb (Dist. in the US by United Artists, 1972) - A noblewoman (Sarah Miles) doomed into a loveless marriage falls into a scandalous affair with the dashing Lord Byron (Richard Chamberlain).  Mills plays the mentor and fellow Member of Parliament with the woman's husband (Jon Finch).
TCM Airings: 0

Gentlemen Don't Eat Poets (Dist. in the US by Live Entertainment, 1995)  - A nobleman (Alan Bates) is more interested in reconstructing dinosaur bones than paying attention to his wife (Theresa Russell). He's not thrilled when his daughter (Lena Headey) brings home her fiancee (Steven Mackintosh), who aspires to be a poet. The new butler (Sting) provides the lady of the manor with the attention she's been missing, then seduces the daughter as well. Could he also be responsible for her disappearance? I don't know anything about Mills' role; he's 11th-billed. This movie had two different titles during its theatrical release and a third for home video release! And it hasn't appeared on TCM by any of those titles.
TCM Airings; 0

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Excellent suggestion. I should have had him on my list.

i think John Mills was honored 5-6 years ago, not certain,Jack Hawkins would be good,but no Ben Hur please ! Veronica Lake would be nice but long shot,she was mostly with Paramount and many of her movies never  made on dvd

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dorothy Gish

I don't know much about Dorothy Gish. I'm not certain I've ever heard her name mentioned that it wasn't in the same sentence as "Lillian and ...". But she was a star in her own right, and these are all films in which she appears without her sister. Maybe TCM mentions Lillian more because it appears most of Dorothy's work isn't under TCM's control. None of her starring vehicles listed below have ever aired on TCM! I haven't seen any of the silents listed below. I did watch Centennial Summer on YouTube last year.

Little Meena's Romance (Triangle Distributing, 1916) - A Pennsylvania Dutch girl (Gish) is left a fortune when her parents die. She goes to live with unpleasant relatives in New York City. There, she encounters a German count (Owen Moore) who, although he believes she's a servant girl, falls in love with her. 
TCM Airings:  0

Betty of Greystone (Triangle Distributing, 1916) - After her father dies, a young woman (Gish) goes to spend some time alone at the estate where he'd once been the caretaker.  She meets the owner (Owen Moore), and they're attracted to each other. She doesn't get along with her new stepfather (George Fawcett), and he begins vicious rumors against her when he spots her on the estate with the owner.
TCM Airings: 0

Stage Struck (Triangle Distributing, 1917) - In a garish theatrical boardinghouse in New York City, an orphan (Gish), who taught herself to be an actress through a correspondence course (ah ha ha ha ha) turns for companionship to the dissolute, castoff son (Frank Bennett) of a wealthy philanthropist (Kate Toncray). They wed, but after she completes a dreadful theatrical tour, she returns to the boardinghouse to find him missing.
TCM Airings: 0

The Little Yank (Triangle Distributing, 1917) - A beautiful girl in neutral Kentucky (Gish) belongs to a family of Union sympathizers. Her brother, a lieutenant in the Union army (Bob Burns) brings home a superior officer (Frank Bennett) while on leave, and the major falls in love with the "little Yank". While the two officers are visiting, the house is surrounded by Confederates.
TCM Airings: 0

The Hope Chest (Paramount, 1918) - The daughter (Gish) of an impoverished vaudeville actor (George Fawcett) works as a waitress in a candy shop, where she delights the customers with her tomboyish antics. She and the propietor's son (Richard Barthelmess) fall in love and secretly marry, but when the young groom breaks the news to his parents (Sam De Grasse and Kate Toncray), they react with such anger, he runs away. She's allowed to continue living with his parents if she'll keep the marriage a secret.
TCM Airings: 0

Boots (Paramount, 1919) - A young servant girl who polishes boots in an English inn (Gish) is an incurable romantic, addicted to melodramatic stories of love and adventure. When she discovers a Bolshevik plot to blow up a government official (Richard Barthelmess), she takes it upon herself to foil it.
TCM Airings: 0

Remodeling Her Husband (Paramount, 1920) - A woman (Gish) discovers the reputation her husband (James Rennie) has as a flirt is well-deserved when she seems riding in a taxi with a strange woman (Harda Daube).
TCM Airings: 0

The Country Flapper (Producers Security Corp., 1922) - A country girl (Gish) has lost her boyfriend (Glenn Hunter) to a flapper from the city (Mildred Marsh). She blackmails his father (Harlan Knight) into giving his consent for her and his son's marriage, but circumstances arise that may make her rethink her position.
TCM Airings: 0

Fury (Warner Bros., 1923) - There's no plot description, but it appears much of it takes place on a ship. Gish is unusually not the top-billed cast member, but she's still the top-billed female. Not the 1936 Spencer Tracy film.
TCM Airings: 0

Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (MGM, 1925) - A Jewish prince (Ramon Navarro) seeks revenge on a childhood friend (Francis X. Bushman) after he's wrongly imprisoned and his family disappears while the events of the Gospels are going on around him. Gish is an extra in the chariot racing scene (so was Mary Pickford. Sounds like all of Hollywood turned out to watch the spectacle and got recruited while there).
TCM Airings: 32

Nell Gwynn (Paramount, 1926) - An actress (Gish) becomes the mistress of the king (Randle Ayrton) and persuades him to convert the palace into a servicemen's home.
TCM Airings: 0

Centennial Summer (20th Century Fox, 1946) - In 1876 Philadelphia, two sisters (Jeanne Crain and Linda Darnell) vie for the affections of a Frenchman (Cornel Wilde) who's come to America to prepare the French pavilion for the centennial exhibition. Gish plays the girls' mother.
TCM Airings: 0

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love your selections sewhite2000! Especially for John Mills. Though I'd add the fantastic noir he made-- THE OCTOBER MAN (1947).

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Charles Bickford

I know him mostly as a character actor whose craggy features made him suitable for playing villains and authority figures, but he was also a leading man, sometimes romantic, earlier in his career, which dates back to the very beginning of the sound era. He seems to have worked everywhere, and I'm including below at least one movie he made at each major studio (except RKO). I think this is a pretty good mix of "in library" and "out of library" films that TCM might actually be able to put together. As usual, I'm focusing mostly on movies I haven't seen (I've only seen Duel in the Sun and The Court-Martial of BIlly Mitchell) and stayed away from most of his films that get played on TCM frequently.

River's End (Warner Bros., 1930) - Bickford plays both a sergeant of the Mounties and an escaped convicted murderer who's his exact lookalike. The Mountie and his alcoholic guide (J. Farrell MacDonald) track the escapee to the farthest reaches of Northern Canada. The Mountie dies of natural causes, and the guide, convinced of the escapee's innocence, allows him to disguise himself as the Mountie, a role he intends to play only long enough to escape for good, until a woman the Mountie had unsuccessfully pursued (Evelyn Knapp) becomes intrigued by the change she perceives in the "Mountie", and they fall for each other.
TCM Airings: 10

Scandal for Sale (Universal, 1932) - A man (Bickford) is promised a prize of $25,000 if he can bring the circulation of a paper up to one million.
TCM Airings: 0

This Day and Age (Paramount, 1933) - High school students band together to dispense vigilante justice to a vicious gangland boss (Bickford). Directed by Cecil B. DeMille!
TCM Airings: 0

The Farmer Takes a Wife (Fox Film Corp. 1935) - In 1850, a farmer (Henry Fonda) works on the Erie Canal to make enough to buy his own farm. He meets a cook (Janet Gaynor) on a canal boat, but she can't consider leaving the exciting life on the canal for a banal one on the farm. Bickford plays the boat owner and the movie's villain.
TCM Airings: 2

Thunder Trail (Paramount, 1937) - A wagon train is robbed by a group of bandits who kill everyone but a pair of young brothers. Years later, the brothers (played as adults by Bickford and James Craig) join forces to bring the gang's leader (Gilbert Roland) to justice.
TCM Airings: 0

Romance of the Redwoods (Columbia, 1939) - Two men (Bickford and Jed Malone) get into a fistfight to determine who will end up with a dishwasher in a California logging camp boarding house (Jean Parker). Bickford loses the fight but must try to clear his name of murder charges after Malone dies under mysterious circumstances.
TCM Airings: 0

Thou Shalt Not Kill (Republic, 1939) - There's not plot description, but Bickford plays a preacher who apparently is trying to make a murderer confess. I almost fainted when I saw Doris Day listed among the cast, because she would have been about 17 at the time, but it's a different Doris Day.
TCM Airings: 0

Tarzan's New York Adventure (MGM, 1942) - Tarzan (Johnny Weismuller) and Jane (Maureen O'Sullivan) travel to New York City to rescue Boy (Johnny Sheffield), who's been kidnapped into a circus. Bickford plays the villainous circus owner and kidnapper.
TCM Airings: 7

Duel in the Sun (United Artists, 1946) - After the death of her father (Herbert Marshall), a half-Native American young woman (Jennifer Jones) goes to live with his first love (Lillian Gish) and finds herself romantically torn between her two sons (Gregory Peck and Joseph Cotten). Bickford plays a ranch boss who gets a small ranch of his own and proposes to Jones, incurring the wrath of Peck.
TCM Airings: 49

Command Decision (MGM, 1948) - Army generals struggle over the decision to prioritize the bombing of German factories producing new jet fighters, knowing the extremely high casualties the mission will cost. Bickford plays a cynical, hard-bitten war correspondent.
TCM Airings: 38

Jim Thorpe - All-American (Warner Bros., 1951) - The triumph and tragedy of the Native American athlete (Burt Lancaster) who, after winning both the pentathlon and decathlon in the same Olympics, is stripped of his medals on a technicality. Bickford plays Pop Warner, Thorpe's college football coach.
TCM Airings: 18

The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell (Warner Bros., 1955) - An American colonel (Gary Cooper) deliberately subjects himself to court-martial so he can call attention to high command's neglect of the aerial fighting forces. Bickford's general is supposed to be an amalgamation of several superiors the real-life Mitchell had to contend with, who saw planes as being good for nothing more than scouting and transportation.
TCM Airings: 10
 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Charles Bickford

I know him mostly as a character actor whose craggy features made him suitable for playing villains and authority figures, but he was also a leading man, sometimes romantic, earlier in his career, which dates back to the very beginning of the sound era. He seems to have worked everywhere, and I'm including below at least one movie he made at each major studio (except RKO). I think this is a pretty good mix of "in library" and "out of library" films that TCM might actually be able to put together. As usual, I'm focusing mostly on movies I haven't seen (I've only seen Duel in the Sun and The Court-Martial of BIlly Mitchell) and stayed away from most of his films that get played on TCM frequently.

River's End (Warner Bros., 1930) - Bickford plays both a sergeant of the Mounties and an escaped convicted murderer who's his exact lookalike. The Mountie and his alcoholic guide (J. Farrell MacDonald) track the escapee to the farthest reaches of Northern Canada. The Mountie dies of natural causes, and the guide, convinced of the escapee's innocence, allows him to disguise himself as the Mountie, a role he intends to play only long enough to escape for good, until a woman the Mountie had unsuccessfully pursued (Evelyn Knapp) becomes intrigued by the change she perceives in the "Mountie", and they fall for each other.
TCM Airings: 10

Scandal for Sale (Universal, 1932) - A man (Bickford) is promised a prize of $25,000 if he can bring the circulation of a paper up to one million.
TCM Airings: 0

This Day and Age (Paramount, 1933) - High school students band together to dispense vigilante justice to a vicious gangland boss (Bickford). Directed by Cecil B. DeMille!
TCM Airings: 0

The Farmer Takes a Wife (Fox Film Corp. 1935) - In 1850, a farmer (Henry Fonda) works on the Erie Canal to make enough to buy his own farm. He meets a cook (Janet Gaynor) on a canal boat, but she can't consider leaving the exciting life on the canal for a banal one on the farm. Bickford plays the boat owner and the movie's villain.
TCM Airings: 2

Thunder Trail (Paramount, 1937) - A wagon train is robbed by a group of bandits who kill everyone but a pair of young brothers. Years later, the brothers (played as adults by Bickford and James Craig) join forces to bring the gang's leader (Gilbert Roland) to justice.
TCM Airings: 0

Romance of the Redwoods (Columbia, 1939) - Two men (Bickford and Jed Malone) get into a fistfight to determine who will end up with a dishwasher in a California logging camp boarding house (Jean Parker). Bickford loses the fight but must try to clear his name of murder charges after Malone dies under mysterious circumstances.
TCM Airings: 0

Thou Shalt Not Kill (Republic, 1939) - There's not plot description, but Bickford plays a preacher who apparently is trying to make a murderer confess. I almost fainted when I saw Doris Day listed among the cast, because she would have been about 17 at the time, but it's a different Doris Day.
TCM Airings: 0

Tarzan's New York Adventure (MGM, 1942) - Tarzan (Johnny Weismuller) and Jane (Maureen O'Sullivan) travel to New York City to rescue Boy (Johnny Sheffield), who's been kidnapped into a circus. Bickford plays the villainous circus owner and kidnapper.
TCM Airings: 7

Duel in the Sun (United Artists, 1946) - After the death of her father (Herbert Marshall), a half-Native American young woman (Jennifer Jones) goes to live with his first love (Lillian Gish) and finds herself romantically torn between her two sons (Gregory Peck and Joseph Cotten). Bickford plays a ranch boss who gets a small ranch of his own and proposes to Jones, incurring the wrath of Peck.
TCM Airings: 49

Command Decision (MGM, 1948) - Army generals struggle over the decision to prioritize the bombing of German factories producing new jet fighters, knowing the extremely high casualties the mission will cost. Bickford plays a cynical, hard-bitten war correspondent.
TCM Airings: 38

Jim Thorpe - All-American (Warner Bros., 1951) - The triumph and tragedy of the Native American athlete (Burt Lancaster) who, after winning both the pentathlon and decathlon in the same Olympics, is stripped of his medals on a technicality. Bickford plays Pop Warner, Thorpe's college football coach.
TCM Airings: 18

The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell (Warner Bros., 1955) - An American colonel (Gary Cooper) deliberately subjects himself to court-martial so he can call attention to high command's neglect of the aerial fighting forces. Bickford's general is supposed to be an amalgamation of several superiors the real-life Mitchell had to contend with, who saw planes as being good for nothing more than scouting and transportation.
TCM Airings: 10
 

Interesting choices. Another good one is WHIRLPOOL (1949). He plays a police officer investigating a crime involving Gene Tierney.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Interesting choices. Another good one is WHIRLPOOL (1949). He plays a police officer investigating a crime involving Gene Tierney.

Charles Bickford is a very good choice for SUTS.        There are so many other films where,  while a supporting player,   his character was very central to the plot and thus he had many scenes with the leading actors for these films.       I'll just mention some of them:    Mr.  Lucky,    Song of Bernadette,  Fallen Angel,  The Women on the Beach, Brute Force,   Johnny Belinda,   A Star is Born (Garland version),   Not As a Stranger (he 'grounds' the second half of this film as a small town doctor),    and The Big Country. 

Hey,   one day wouldn't be enough! 

 Charles Bickford 1950s.JPG

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Charles Bickford is a very good choice for SUTS.        There are so many other films where,  while a supporting player,   hi character was very central to the plot and thus he had many scenes with the leading actors for these films.       I'll just mention some of them:    Mr.  Lucky,    Song of Bernadette,  Fallen Angel,  The Women on the Beach, Brute Force,   Johnny Belinda,   A Star is Born (Garland version),   Not As a Stranger (he 'grounds' the second half of this film as a small town doctor),    and The Big Country. 

Hey,   one day wouldn't be enough! 

 Charles Bickford 1950s.JPG

Bickford was different than other 'stars' of his generation. He didn't like being controlled by studio bosses, so he was an early example of a freelancer. I think in the 1930s, it was basically Bickford, Fredric March and Barbara Stanwcyk that freelanced. Everyone else was under long-term contracts to their home studios. But these three were doing multi-picture deals and hopping from one studio to the next. So it helped them maintain a measure of authority over their careers and the types of roles they played.

John Saxon guest-starred multiple times on the long-running western TV series The Virginian. He is the only guest who worked with all the main leads (Lee J. Cobb, Charles Bickford, John McIntire and Stewart Granger). He said Bickford was a perfectionist, the one who came on to the set and demanded a high level of professionalism and quality acting from all his scene partners.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about Isabel Jewell.     While a supporting player she always made an impressive presence in  the films she was in,  she was in a lot of first-rate films.

As for the films I have seen:

Jewell was in two firms with William Powell and Myrna Loy,  Manhattan Melodrama and Evelyn Prentice.     Shadow of Doubt with Richard Cortez and Virginia Bruce.     Big Brown Eyes with Cary Grant and Joan Bennett.     Lost Horizon with Ronald Colman.    Marked Women with Bette Davis and Bogart.      Two Val Lewton produced films,   The Leopard Man and The Seventh Victim.      Born to Kill with Laurence Tierney and Claire Trevor.    The Bishop Wife's with Cary Grant and Loretta Young.      The Snake Pit (un-credited as a fellow patient of DeHavilland).       

 She was also in a lot of pre-codes I haven't seen.          Below is from one of them.    Looks interesting. 

Isabel Jewell ~ The Tough Talking Blonde

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

How about Isabel Jewell.     While a supporting player she always made an impressive presence in  the films she was in,  she was in a lot of first-rate films.

As for the films I have seen:

Jewell was in two firms with William Powell and Myrna Loy,  Manhattan Melodrama and Evelyn Prentice.     Shadow of Doubt with Richard Cortez and Virginia Bruce.     Big Brown Eyes with Cary Grant and Joan Bennett.     Lost Horizon with Ronald Colman.    Marked Women with Bette Davis and Bogart.      Two Val Lewton produced films,   The Leopard Man and The Seventh Victim.      Born to Kill with Laurence Tierney and Claire Trevor.    The Bishop Wife's with Cary Grant and Loretta Young.      The Snake Pit (un-credited as a fellow patient of DeHavilland).       

 She was also in a lot of pre-codes I haven't seen.          Below is from one of them.    Looks interesting. 

Isabel Jewell ~ The Tough Talking Blonde

I don't know much about her. What film is the photo from..?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

I don't know much about her. What film is the photo from..?

I'm not sure since I haven't see the pre-code films she was in and this is from one of those.     Could be The Women in His Life an MGM film that featured Otto Kruger.

Funny but I forgot to mention that she also had a minor role in Gone With The Wind as Emmy Slattery.      She was also in Design For Living,  as Edward Everett Horton's  Stenographer. 

One of her best and more memorable roles was in the mentioned Marked Women with Bette Davis as one of the "hostess" that lived with Davis and the other gals,  that was a witness to Davis's sister getting murdered.     

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Edmond O'Brien

He was a dashing leading man early on, but I've always found him interesting for being "action heroes" in movies in which he wasn't even the lead character, like The Killers and White Heat. When no less than three different people got Best Supporting Actor nominations in 1954 for On the Waterfront, it was O'Brien who walked off with the award for The Barefoot Contessa. He hams it up in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence - I didn't even recognize him; another board member brought it to my attention. In Fantastic Voyage, while all this miraculous science is going on around him, all he wants is some sugar in his coffee! He's Edmond O'Brien, and here are 12 of his movies. He also worked at all the studios, most of which are represented below (except for MGM and United Artists, actually, so who knows if TCM would ever show a whole day like this?). I've only seen three of these movies, but the other titles interest me.

Parachute Battalion (RKO, 1941) - A combination of scripted and documentary footage that's practically a recruitment film released three months before Pearl Harbor. The estranged son (O'Brien) of a colonel (Robert Barrat), a football hero (Robert Preston) and a hillbilly (Buddy Ebsen) end up in the paratroopers.
TCM Airings: 7

The Killers (Universal, 1946) - Hit men (Charles McGraw and William Conrad) kill an unresisting victim (Burt Lancaster), and an insurance investigator (O'Brien) uncovers his past involvement with a beautiful, deadly woman (Ava Gardner).
TCM Airings: 26

Fighter Squadron (Warner Bros., 1948) - During World War II, an insubordinate fighter pilot (O'Brien) finds the shoe on the other foot when he's been promoted.
TCM Airings: 27

White Heat (Warner Bros, 1949) - A psychopathic criminal with a mother complex (James Cagney) makes a daring break from prison and leads his old gang in a chemical plant payroll heist. O'Brien is an undercover cop who befriends Cagney in prison then finds himself having to roll along with the breakout.
TCM Airings: 84

Between Midnight and Dawn (Columbia, 1950) - Prowl car cops on night duty (Mark Stevens, O'Brien) romance a reluctant lady (Gale Storm) who's in danger from a vengeful racketeer (Donald Buka).
TCM Airings: 3

The Greatest Show on Earth (Paramount, 1952) - The dramatic lives of trapeze artists (Cornel Wilde and Betty Hutton), a clown (James Stewart) and an elephant trainer (Lyle Bettger) are told against a background of circus spectacle. O'Brien has an uncredited cameo as a midway barker in the final scene.
TCM Airings: 18

The Bigamist (Filmakers Releasing Organization, 1953) - A man (O'Brien) secretly married to two women (Joan Fontaine, Ida Lupino) feels the pressure of his deceit. Also directed by Lupino.
TCM Airings: 16

D-Day: the Sixth of June (20th Century Fox, 1956) - En route to Normandy, two officers - one American (Robert Taylor), one British (Richard Todd) - reminisce in flashback about their romances with the same woman (Dana Wynter).
TCM Airings: 3

Sing, Boy, Sing (20th Century Fox, 1958) - A showbiz manager (O'Brien) finds a naive young man (Tommy Sands) with incredible vocal talent, takes him away from his humble beginnings, changes his appearance and turns him into a singing sensation.
TCM Airings: 0

The Great Imposter (Universal, 1960) - A versatile man (Tony Curtis) gets his kicks out of impersonating everyone from a Marine to a monk to a Navy surgeon to a prison warden and eventually gets into trouble with the law because of it. O'Brien plays the captain of the Canadian warboat where Curtis poses as a surgeon. Though they're similar in plot, Catch Me If You Can isn't an adaptation of this film. The events that inspired that film didn't happen until after this film was released.
TCM Airings: 0

Syanon (Columbia, 1965) - Chronicling the goings-on at a rehabilitation center for people with all kinds of addictions founded and run by a recovering alcoholic (O'Brien).
TCM Airings: 0

The Love God? (Universal, 1969) - The publisher of a birdwatcher's magazine (Don Knotts) watches his publication be converted into a girlie mag by an unscrupulous operator (O'Brien). The general public thinks he's responsible for the change. Most vilify him, but some females are suddenly attracted to him.
TCM Airings; 0

 

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Edmond O'Brien

He was a dashing leading man early on, but I've always found him interesting for being "action heroes" in movies in which he wasn't even the lead character, like The Killers and White Heat. When no less than three different people got Best Supporting Actor nominations in 1954 for On the Waterfront, it was O'Brien who walked off with the award for The Barefoot Contessa. He hams it up in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence - I didn't even recognize him; another board member brought it to my attention. In Fantastic Voyage, while all this miraculous science is going on around him, all he wants is some sugar in his coffee! He's Edmond O'Brien, and here are 12 of his movies. He also worked at all the studios, most of which are represented below (except for MGM and United Artists, actually, so who knows if TCM would ever show a whole day like this?). I've only seen three of these movies, but the other titles interest me.

Parachute Battalion (RKO, 1941) - A combination of scripted and documentary footage that's practically a recruitment film released three months before Pearl Harbor. The estranged son (O'Brien) of a colonel (Robert Barrat), a football hero (Robert Preston) and a hillbilly (Buddy Ebsen) end up in the paratroopers.
TCM Airings: 7

The Killers (Universal, 1946) - Hit men (Charles McGraw and William Conrad) kill an unresisting victim (Burt Lancaster), and an insurance investigator (O'Brien) uncovers his past involvement with a beautiful, deadly woman (Ava Gardner).
TCM Airings: 26

Fighter Squadron (Warner Bros., 1948) - During World War II, an insubordinate fighter pilot (O'Brien) finds the shoe on the other foot when he's been promoted.
TCM Airings: 27

White Heat (Warner Bros, 1949) - A psychopathic criminal with a mother complex (James Cagney) makes a daring break from prison and leads his old gang in a chemical plant payroll heist. O'Brien is an undercover cop who befriends Cagney in prison then finds himself having to roll along with the breakout.
TCM Airings: 84

Between Midnight and Dawn (Columbia, 1950) - Prowl car cops on night duty (Mark Stevens, O'Brien) romance a reluctant lady (Gale Storm) who's in danger from a vengeful racketeer (Donald Buka).
TCM Airings: 3

The Greatest Show on Earth (Paramount, 1952) - The dramatic lives of trapeze artists (Cornel Wilde and Betty Hutton), a clown (James Stewart) and an elephant trainer (Lyle Bettger) are told against a background of circus spectacle. O'Brien has an uncredited cameo as a midway barker in the final scene.
TCM Airings: 18

The Bigamist (Filmakers Releasing Organization, 1953) - A man (O'Brien) secretly married to two women (Joan Fontaine, Ida Lupino) feels the pressure of his deceit. Also directed by Lupino.
TCM Airings: 16

D-Day: the Sixth of June (20th Century Fox, 1956) - En route to Normandy, two officers - one American (Robert Taylor), one British (Richard Todd) - reminisce in flashback about their romances with the same woman (Dana Wynter).
TCM Airings: 3

Sing, Boy, Sing (20th Century Fox, 1958) - A showbiz manager (O'Brien) finds a naive young man (Tommy Sands) with incredible vocal talent, takes him away from his humble beginnings, changes his appearance and turns him into a singing sensation.
TCM Airings: 0

The Great Imposter (Universal, 1960) - A versatile man (Tony Curtis) gets his kicks out of impersonating everyone from a Marine to a monk to a Navy surgeon to a prison warden and eventually gets into trouble with the law because of it. O'Brien plays the captain of the Canadian warboat where Curtis poses as a surgeon. Though they're similar in plot, Catch Me If You Can isn't an adaptation of this film. The events that inspired that film didn't happen until after this film was released.
TCM Airings: 0

Syanon (Columbia, 1965) - Chronicling the goings-on at a rehabilitation center for people with all kinds of addictions founded and run by a recovering alcoholic (O'Brien).
TCM Airings: 0

The Love God? (Universal, 1969) - The publisher of a birdwatcher's magazine (Don Knotts) watches his publication be converted into a girlie mag by an unscrupulous operator (O'Brien). The general public thinks he's responsible for the change. Most vilify him, but some females are suddenly attracted to him.
TCM Airings; 0

Nice list.

FIGHTER SQUADRON and THE BIGAMIST are both in the public domain and easy to show. SYNANON has had at least one airing on TCM, because that's how I saw it and recorded it. I really like that film; it's mainstream but a bit "off center."

BETWEEN MIDNIGHT AND DAWN is a good noir. Another noir with O'Brien worth checking out is 711 OCEAN DRIVE (1950). Both of these were made at Columbia. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/711_Ocean_Drive

I'd also recommend SEVEN DAYS IN MAY (1964). O'Brien and Fredric March give the best performances.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be good to see Edmond O'Brien as part of SUTS but he has enough of a film legacy to warrant a Star of the Month turn. 

A day or two of noir \  crime films (he was in a lot of these),    westerns,   war and adventure films,    and a day of comedic performances (e.g  The Girl Can't Help It with Janye Mansfield).

O'Brien keep very busy over a 30 year career from The Hunchback of Notre Dame until The Wild Bunch  (he made films after this but that was his last major one).

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was on an Edmond O'Brien kick last year.  I would support O'Brien as SUTS and/or SOTM. I want to see 711 Ocean Drive, I missed it when it aired on Noir Alley.

Not listed in SeWhite's list, I would also add:

A Girl, A Guy and A Gob.  One of O'Brien's earlier films (he's dare  I say, cute in this film?).  He plays "A Guy" to Lucille Ball's "A Girl."  He's in  a love triangle with George Murphy's "A Gob." I really enjoy this comedy.  It was produced by Harold Lloyd and deserves to be better known. 

The Hitch-Hiker.  Ida Lupino's noir about two men unknowingly picking up a fugitive hitchhiker is fantastic.  I've seen it multiple times and I still find William Talman as creepy as I did when I saw  it the first time.

DOA.  I really enjoy this noir except for the stupid cat call slide whistle sound they added when O'Brien first arrives in SF.  That part was annoying and took me out of the film.  If they wanted O'Brien's character to cat call, they should have just had him  whistle,  or dubbed someone else's whistling if O'Brien couldn't do it. 

If O'Brien were selected, TCM would probably add The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Barefoot Contessa

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/1/2020 at 9:51 PM, TopBilled said:

Yes, I just verified it with the list in the SUTS sub-forum. Surprisingly, Walter Brennan has not yet had a day in August.

He's had birthday tributes (daytime schedule).

know it sounds off the wall, but look at his career & they seem to be running out once in awhile

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Miles Mander

Like Lilli Palmer, this is another actor I'd never heard of before somebody mentioned him on here, though it appears I've seen some of his films (I'm only including two films below I've actually seen, The Man in the Iron Mask and That Hamilton Woman). He began his career in the UK and continental Europe in the silent era and appears to have relocated to Hollywood by the mid-'30s. He died relatively young, just shy of his 58th birthday in 1946.

The Old Arm Chair (British Exhibitors' Films, 1920) - A little girl (Manora Thew) awakes from a dream about the old arm chair in which she's fallen asleep. The dream concerns a hidden letter, a hoard of money and a wrongfully convicted man (Cecil Mannering). A very early career Mander has an uncredited role I can't find any information about.
TCM Airings: 0

Tiptoes (Dist. in the US by Paramount, 1927) - A British silent film version of a George Gershwin stage musical with a couple of American stars (Dorothy Gish and Will Rogers). Future cinematographer Jack Cardiff also has a role in it. Mander's character has both a first and last name, so I assume it's a part of some size, but I can't find any information about it.
TCM Airings: 0

Jokeren (Kinografen, 1928) - Looks like a Danish film. The title means "The Joker", (it's 12 years before the comic book villain was created, so apparently it's not about him), and it's an adaptation of a play. I don't know anything else about the movie or Mander's character.
TCM Airings: 0

Lily Christine (Dist. in the US by Paramount, 1932) - A woman (Corinne Griffith) is threatened with divorce by her husband (Jack Trevor) after spending an innocent night with a friend (Colin Clive).  Once again, I have no information about Mander's role.
TCM Airings: 0

Bitter Sweet (Dist. in the US by United Artists, 1933) - A young girl (Anna Neagle) falls in love with a young conductor (Fernand Gravey) in Vienna, and they marry. Their marriage, however, is threatened by a wealthy man (Mander) who sets his sights on the wife.
TCM Airings: 1

The Three Musketeers (RKO, 1935) - In this RKO version, young Gascon D'artagnan (Walter Abel) arrives in Paris, his heart set on joining the king's Musketeers. He's taken under the wing of three of the most respected and feared Musketeers, Porthos (Moroni Olsen), Aramis (Onslow Stevens) and Athos (Paul Lukas). Together, they fight to save France and the honor of a lady (Heather Angel) against the machinations of Cardinal Richelieu (Nigel de Brulier). Mander plays King Louis XIII.
TCM Airings: 20

Slave Ship (20th Century Fox, 1937) - A captain (Warner Baxter) orders his first mate (Wallace Beery) to get rid of his slave-trading crew and get a more respectable bunch for standard shipping, but when he brings his new bride (Elizabeth Allan) aboard, he finds the same old setup, including the slave trade.
TCM Airings: 0

The Man in the Iron Mask (United Artists, 1939) - Despotic king Louis XIV discovers he has a twin brother (both played by Louis Hayward) who's grown up under the tutelage of his foster father, the patriotic Musketeer D'Artganan (Warren William).  In this story of the Musketeers at an older age, Mander plays Aramis.
TCM Airings: 23

The Earl of Chicago (MGM, 1940) - A former bootlegger (Robert Montgomery) hires a man he once framed and who spent seven years in prison (Edward Arnold) to be his general manager now that he can sell booze legally, not knowing the other man still bears a grudge. The former bootlegger is informed he's a new earl by an English solicitor (Reginald Owen). The general manager arranges for him to travel to England to sell his property (which the general manager knows can't actually be done) so he can ruin his Chicago business in his absence. Mander has an uncredited part as the Illinois attorney general.
TCM Airings: 12

That Hamilton Woman (United Artists, 1941) - The rise and fall of a courtesan and dance-hall girl (Vivien Leigh) who has relationships with both a lord (Alan Mowbray) and Admiral Horatio Nelson (Laurence Olivier) during the Napoleonic wars. Mander plays another admiral.
TCM Airings: 29

Apache Trail (MGM, 1942) - The manager of a stagecoach line way station in dangerous Apache territory (Lloyd Nolan) is suspicious when his notorious outlaw brother (William Lundigan) arrives soon after a stagecoach with a box of valuable cargo. But Apaches soon attack the station, and the two brothers and a disparate group of passengers and employees must work together to fight them off. Mander plays a sickly artist who's one of the passengers.
TCM Airings: 17

The Scarlet Claw (Universal, 1944) - While at a conference in Quebec, Sherlock Holmes (Basil Rathbone) is called to a nearby village where a woman (Gertrude Astor) is found dead with her throat torn out. The villagers blame a supernatural monster, but Holmes suspects there was a human killer. Mander plays a terrified old judge.
TCM Airings: 1

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, sewhite2000 said:

Lily Christine (Dist. in the US by Paramount, 1932) - A woman (Corinne Griffith) is threatened with divorce by her husband (Jack Trevor) after spending an innocent night with a friend (Colin Clive).  Once again, I have no information about Mander's role.

 

TCM Airings: 0

I'd like very much to see this, but haven't heard conclusively if it survives, or if an archive out there has a copy that TCM could access. (Some number of titles are reported to be extant,  but the archive holding the print hasn't made a preservation copy.) Another Miles Mander title (that I can confirm is extant) is The First Born (1928), starring Mander and Madeleine Carroll. Alma Reville adapted the screenplay from Mander's own novel.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would think you might want to adjust the stars for the movies your want to see.  I think TCM should show Blade Runner, so it should have a Harrison Ford day.  I think TCM should show The Passenger and The Shining, so it should have a Jack Nicholson day.  At some point it should show The Last Tycoon and 1900 so it should have a Robert De Niro day.  TCM has never shown Peter Ibbetson, and i wouldn't mind having Lives of a Bengal Lancer and Man of the West sometime on a weekday afternoon when I can see them, so it should have a Gary Cooper day.  TCM should show The Damned and Providence, and also rebroadcast Death in Venice and Victim, so it should have a Dirk Bogarde day.  Sooner or later they will have a Fredric March day, so they should show Death takes a Holiday and Death of a Salesman.  About the last two movies I am generally confused.  I can understand why the people who have the rights to It's a Wonderful Life, The Sound of Music, The Godfather and Star Wars wouldn't want to share them with TCM.  But who holds the rights to the two March movies?  How do they expect to make any money from them if nobody sees them, since it's not as if they're constantly popping up on television? 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jane Darwell

Jane Darwell had a 50-year career dating back to the earliest days of Hollywood up through Mary Poppins. I also remember reading somewhere that  young Robert Osborne lived in her house. I don't remember the story behind that. Just to be contrarian I left off her Oscar-winning performance in The Grapes of Wrath. I actually have seen five of these 12 movies. I usually don't include so many ones that I've seen, but I thought they were all worth recommending.

Tom Sawyer (Paramount, 1930) - In this Paramount version of the classic Mark Twain tale, Tom (Jackie Coogan) and his pals Huckleberry Finn (Junior Dirken) and Joe Harper (Dick Winslow) have numerous adventures, including running away to become pirates and, after everyone believes they've drowned, attending their own funerals. Darwell has a small part as Huck's caretaker, the Widow Douglas, a role she reprised with more screen time in the followup, Huckleberry Finn, the following year.
TCM Airings: 0

Child of Manhattan (Columbia, 1933) - A man (John Boles) is extraordinarily wealthy because his grandfather happened to buy farmland in what would become midtown Manhattan. To reassure his worried aunt (Clara Blandick) that everything is legitimate, he visits one of his tenants, a dance hall. There, he's charmed by a dime-a-dance girl (Nancy Carroll). They begin a secret affair which turns into a secret marriage when they discover she's pregnant. She has a miscarriage. Thinking he only married her because of the baby, she flees to Mexico for a divorce, where she takes up with a former suitor who now owns a silver mine there (Buck Jones). Things get more complicated when the millionaire follows her. Darwell plays Carroll's mother.
TCM Airings: 5

Design for Living (Paramount, 1933) - A woman (Miriam Hopkins) can't decide between two men who love her (Gary Cooper and Frederic March), and the trio decide to try living together in a friendly, ostensibly platonic relationship. Darwell plays Cooper's housekeeper.
TCM Airings: 13

Let's Talk It Over (Universal, 1934) - A young sailor (Chester Morris) thinks he's saved a woman (Mae Clarke) from drowning. Unfortunately for the sailor, she was only pretending to be drowning so that another young man she had her eye on (John Warburton) could attempt to rescue her. Darwell is 12th-billed; I couldn't find any info about her character.
TCM Airings: 0

Bright Eyes (Fox Film Corp., 1934) - An orphaned girl (Shirley Temple) is taken in by a wealthy, snobbish family at the insistence of their rich, crotchety uncle (Charles Sellon), even as her devoted aviator godfather (James Dunn) fights for custody. Darwell plays the chef for the wealthy family.
TCM Airings: 15

Little Miss Nobody (20th Century Fox, 1936) - A girl (Jane Withers) gets in trouble in her orphanage and is sent to reform school.  She escapes en route and is taken to trial where she discovers her father (Ralph Morgan) is the prosecutor. Darwell is second-billed, but I don't have any information about her role.
TCM Airings: 0

Wife, Doctor and Nurse (20th Century Fox, 1937) - A social butterfly (Loretta Young) marries a Park Avenue doctor (Warner Baxter) but discovers his nurse (Virginia Bruce) is in love with him (sounds a bit like Wife vs. Secretary). Darwell plays Baxter's housekeeper.
TCM Airings: 0

Unexpected Father (Universal, 1939) - A man (Dennis O'Keefe) learns that his former dancing partner has been killed, leaving a baby boy (Baby Sandy), So, he takes in the baby to live with him and his roommate (Mischa Auer). The baby catches the measles, and the two men miss a big audition while quarantined. Meanwhile, the man's girlfriend (Diana Donovan) has dinner with his manager (Donald Briggs) to try to smooth things over so he won't be fired for missing work, but that only sends the man into a fit of jealousy. Darwell is 13th-billed. I don't know anything about her role.
TCM Airings: 0

All That Money Can Buy (RKO, 1941) - Re-released under the title The Devil and Daniel Webster. A New Hampshire farmer in the 1800s (James Craig) makes a pact with Satan (Walter Huston) for riches, then enlists Daniel Webster (Edward Arnold) to extract him from his contract. Darwell plays the protagonist's mother.
TCM Airings: 16

Tender Comrade (RKO, 1943) - A young defense plant worker (Ginger Rogers) whose husband (Robert Ryan) is serving in World War II shares a house with three other women in the same situation (Ruth Hussey, Patricia Collinge, Kim Hunter). The film's "share and share alike" credo was used as evidence against writer Dalton Trumbo and director Edward Dymytryk, both of whom ended up as members of the blacklisted Hollywood 10. Darwell comforts the sobbing Rogers as her husband is leaving early in the movie then doesn't reappear. If she had more scenes, they were cut.
TCM Airings: 27

Train to Alcatraz (Republic, 1948) - A group of prisoners being transported by train to Alcatraz prison plot an escape. Darwell is sixth-billed; don't know anything about her role. She's ... on the train, maybe?
TCM Airings: 0

Journey into Light (20th Century Fox, 1951) - The wife (Peggy Webber) of an ambitious minister (Sterling Hayden) commits suicide. Embittered, he turns away from God and winds up a bum on Skid Row until he finds meaning in life again through the love of the blind daughter (Viveca Lindefors) of a missionary (Ludwig Donath). While I've seen it (on YouTube), I've forgotten the nature of Darwell's character. She's sixth-billed.
TCM Airings: 0

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...