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Who would you like to see honored for 2020 Summer Under the Stars?


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Agnes Moorehead

As a child, I only knew her from Bewitched, which, according to imdb, even though it earned her a couple of Emmy nominations, she was always a bit bewildered by, the magic element being almost too silly for her, and she had it worked in her contract where she only had to appear on eight of every 12 episodes, so that she could continue to work in other media. And she worked in them all, most importantly for her, it appears, in radio, where she got her start and originated roles that went on to be played by other actresses in the movie adaptations - the lead in Sorry, Wrong Number; Mrs. Danvers in Rebecca; the Dragon Lady in Terry and the Pirates; Margot Lane in The Shadow. Radio was so important to her, she had it written into her contract at MGM that she could still work in radio, even if she wasn't doing adaptations of MGM movies. It was through radio she met Orson Welles and became a part of his Mercury Theatre Group, which included Joseph Cotten, Everett Sloane and others. After the cultural explosion of the War of the Worlds broadcast, RKO gave the troupe $100,000, and they all moved out West to begin working on that famous movie about a certain citizen. She was nominated four times for Best Supporting Actress (and never won). Continuing my contrarian steak, I'm only including one of those performances below. I've only seen three of these movies - The Magnificent AmbersonsJorney into Fear and Meet Me in Las Vegas, but all the rest sound interesting.

The Magnificent Ambersons (RKO, 1942) - The spoiled young heir to the decaying Amberson fortune (Tim Holt) comes between his widowed mother (Dolores Costello) and the man she's always loved (Joseph Cotten). Moorehead got an Oscar nomination for playing the spinster aunt who perhaps best personifies the descent of the family into obscurity and poverty.
TCM Airings: 97

Journey into Fear (RKO, 1943) - An American ballistics expert in Turkey (Joseph Cotten) finds himself targeted by Nazi agents. Safe passage home by ship is arranged for him, but he soon discovers his pursuers are also on board. Moorehead plays the wife of a cockney socialist (Frank Readick) aboard ship.
TCM Airings: 40

Keep Your Powder Dry (MGM, 1945) - A disparate group of women try to adjust to their new lives after enlisting in the Women's Army Corps. Moorehead plays the base-commanding lieutenant colonel.
TCM Airings: 22

Her Highness and the Bellboy (MGM, 1945) - A bellboy at a swanky New York City hotel (Robert Walker) starts to ignore his girlfriend (June Allyson) after meeting a beautiful European princess (Hedy Lamarr). Moorehad plays a countess.
TCM Airings: 30

The Lost Moment (Universal, 1947) - A publisher (Robert Cummings) insinuates himself into the moldering mansion of the 100-year-old lover of a long-dead poet (Moorehead) in order to find his lost love letters.
TCM Airings: 0

Captain Blackjack (Dist. in the US by Classic Pictures, 1950) - A bold and attractive American (George Sanders) smuggles drugs across the Spanish Mediterranean. One woman (Patricia Roc) is in love with him, while another double-crossing woman (Moorehead) tries to exploit him, as does a shady trafficker (Marcel Dalio). Meanwhile, behind the scenes, an inspector (Dennis Wyndham) patiently waits for his chance to nab the smuggler.
TCM Airings: 0

Adventures of Captain Fabian (Dist. in the US by Republic, 1951) - A sea captain (Errol Flynn) becomes involved with a servant girl (Micheline Presle) in the early days of New Orleans. She sees him as a way to gain access to wealthy households. Moorehead plays Presle's aunt.
TCM Airings: 0

The Blue Veil (RKO, 1951) - A young widow (Jane Wyman) fills the emptiness in her life with by becoming a children's nurse. The years pass while she's still trying to figure out her place in life. The children of her various employers grow and are just about ready to face the world on their own. It appears she will once again be alone, but she discovers the children have ideas about helping their beloved mentor. Moorehad I can only assume plays the mother of one of these children. There are reviews from as long ago as 2005 on imdb wondering why TCM never plays this RKO release.
TCM Airings: 0

The Left Hand of God (20th Century Fox, 1955) - At a Catholic mission in China, the long-awaited new priest proves to be a tough guy (Humphrey Bogart), disturbingly attractive to the mission nurse (Gene Tierney). Moorehead plays the wife of the doctor at the mission (E.G. Marshall).
TCM Airings: 5

Meet Me in Las Vegas (MGM, 1956) - In Las Vegas, a gambling rancher (Dan Dailey) and a ballerina (Cyd Charise)discover some people have luck at cards while others have luck at love. Moorehead plays Dailey's mother.
TCM Airings: 36

The Bat (Allied Artists, 1959) - A crazed killer known as "The Bat" (It's supposed to be a mystery, but Spoiler Alert! It's probably Vincent Price) is on the loose in a mansion full of people. In a rare leading role, Moorehead plays a very Jessica Fletcher-like mystery writer who finds herself wrapped up in a real mystery.
TCM Airings: 9

Twenty Plus Two (Allied Artists, 1961) - The fan club secretary of a famous movie star (Brad Dexter) has been brutally murdered. She has newspaper clippings in her office regarding a missing heiress. Did the secretary know something about her disappearance? A private detective (David Janssen) investigates. Moorehead plays the missing girl's mother.
TCM Airings: 3
 

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Sylvia Sidney

I was aware of her late-career work in films like Beetlejuice and Mars Attacks!, although I didn't know her by name. While I've seen some films she's been in, I have to admit I was unaware of her as a distinct personality. But I see she was a leading lady for much of the '30s and early '40s, particularly at Paramount, before moving to a lot of TV work. then occasionally returning to films from the early '70s on. I am including her one Oscar-nominated performance. I don't believe I've actually seen any of these movies all the way through (well, except Beetlejuice, forgot about that one already), so a day with this lineup would be quite a treat to me. TCM hasn't shown any of these Paramount movies. It would be nice if they could.

Ladies of the Big House (Paramount, 1931) - A married couple (Sidney, Gene Raymond) are imprisoned for crimes they didn't commit.
TCM Airings: 0

Madame Butterfly (Paramount, 1932) - A lieutenant (Cary Grant) marries a geisha-in-training (Sidney), but soon after abandons her and moves back to the US.
TCM Airings: 0

Merrily, We Go to Hell (Paramount, 1932) - A drunken newspaperman (Frederic March) is rescued from his alcoholic haze by an heiress (Sidney) whose love sobers him up, and she encourages him to write a play, but he falls off the wagon.
TCM Airings: 0

Jennie Gerhardt (Paramount, 1933) - A destitute young woman working at a hotel in Columbus (Sidney) meets a United States senator (Donald Cook) who becomes infatuated with her. He helps her family and declares his wish to marry her.
TCM Airings: 0

Fury (MGM, 1936) - A wrongly accused prisoner (Spencer Tracy) barely survives a lynch mob attack and is presumed dead. He does nothing to dispel the notion, and vindictively tries to frame the members of the mob for his alleged murder. Sidney plays the woman he loves and intended to marry before things went wrong for him.
TCM Airings: 52

You Only Live Once (United Artists, 1937) - The secretary (Sidney) of a public defender (Barton MacLane) and an ex-convict (Henry Fonda) get married and try to make a life together, but a series of disasters send their lives spiraling out of control.
TCM Airings: 9

You and Me (Paramount, 1938) - An altruistic department store owner (George Raft) hires ex-convicts to give them a second chance at life. Unfortunately, one of the convicts he hires (Barton MacLane) recruits two of his fellow ex-convicts (Roscoe Karnes, Warren Hymer) in a plan to rob the store. Sidney plays a clerk in the store.
TCM Airings: 0

The Wagons Roll at Night (Warner Bros., 1941) - After a local grocery clerk (Eddie Albert) rescues a baby from an escaped lion, a circus owner (Humphrey Bogart) builds him into a star attraction but balks when the clerk falls in love with his sister (Sidney).
TCM Airings: 19

Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams (Columbia, 1973) - A middle-aged New York City homemaker (Joanne Woodward) finds herself in an emotional crisis, which forces her to re-examine her life, as well as her relationships with her mother (Sidney), her eye doctor husband (Martin Balsam), her alienated daughter (Dori Brenner) and her estranged son (Ron Rickards). Sideny got her only Oscar nomination for this film.
TCM Airings: 7

I Never Promised You a Rose Garden (New World, 1977) - A disturbed and institutionalized 16-year-old girl (Kathleen Quinlan) struggles to distinguish between fantasy and reality. Sidney plays a returning patient who couldn't make it on the outside.
TCM Airings: 0

Hammett (Orion, 1982) - The real-life mystery writer Dashiell Hammett (Frederic Forrest) gets involved in the investigation of the disappearance of a beautiful Chinese cabaret actress (Lydia Lei) in San Francisco. Sidney plays a woman who runs a charity home for girls.
TCM Airings: 2 (But not in 22 years! Don't hold your breath)

Beetlejuice (Warner Bros., 1988) - The spirits of a deceased couple (Alec Baldwin, Geena Davis) are harassed by an unbearable family (including Jeffrey Jones and Catherine O'Hara) and hire a malicious spirit (Michael Keaton) to drive them out. Sidney plays an "afterlife counselor".
TCM Airings: 1 (Looks like it was during 31 Days of Oscar in 2003 - it did win for Best Makeup)


 

 

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13 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

TCM hasn't shown any of these Paramount movies. It would be nice if they could.

Yea,  it would be nice if TCM showed early 30s Paramount movies,   period (instead of the handful,  if that,  per year).

Age old issues,  I'm sure you're aware of.

 

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Margaret Sullavan

The lack of an "i" in her last name always throws me for a loop. Looks like she only made 18 films, so the list below will represent two-thirds of her output. TCM being TCM, I've only ever seen her MGM movies (You can compare below how often TCM airs her Universal stuff compared to her MGM stuff). Although they did show the Universal film Back Street during this year's 31 Days of Oscar, which I unfortunately missed. I won't dwell too much on her personal life. Typically, I don't follow that stuff all that much. But I've certainly noticed while compiling these lists that a number of actors and especially actresses from that era came to sad ends that seems to me to be on a scale out of proportion to society as a whole. There are probably a lot of reasons for that. She was married four times (Henry Fonda and William Wyler were her first two husbands). She had two children commit suicide (though one of them long after her own death). Another daughter wrote memoirs about an unstable childhood being raised by Sullavan and her third husband, Leland Hayward, which got made into the 1980 movie Haywire with Lee Remick and Jason Robards. She became almost entirely deaf and hadn't worked at all in the last six years of her life. She died of a barbituate overdose just short of being 51. It was ruled accidental. I think I've only seen three of her movies, all MGM releases, and I'm including two of them below - Three Comrades and The Shop Around the Corner (I'm leaving out The Mortal Storm, which I don't care for as much).

Only Yesterday (Universal, 1933) - A one-night fling during World War I results in a young girl (Sullavan in her first film at 24) getting pregnant. Years later, she meets the man (John Boles) again. He's now a successful businessman and doesn't even remember her but tries to seduce her.
TCM Airings: 0

Little Man, What Now? (Universal, 1934) - A young couple (Sullavan, Douglass Montgomery) struggling with poverty must keep their marriage a secret so that the husband can keep his job, because his boss (Alan Hale) doesn't like to hire married men.
TCM Airings: 0

The Good Fairy (Universal, 1935) - A naive girl (Sullavan) just out of a cloistered orphanage finds that being a "good fairy" to strangers can make life complicated.
TCM Airings: 1

Next Time We Love (Universal, 1936) -  The relationship of a young married couple (Sullavan, James Stewart) becomes strained when he gets an overseas assignment as a foreign correspondent, and she becomes a major stage star.
TCM Airings: 0

The Moon's Our Home (Paramount, 1936) - In this comedy about marriage and everything related to it, a New York City novelist (Henry Fonda) meets an actress (Sullavan). They date and later marry, although they're unaware of each other's fame. It all comes out in the open on the honeymoon, when the insults and arguments fly.
TCM Airings: 0

The Shopworn Angel (MGM, 1938) - Shortly after the United States entry into World War I in 1917, a Broadway actress (Sullavan) allows a naive soldier to pretend to date her to impress his friends, but a real romance soon develops.
TCM Airings: 36

The Shining Hour (MGM, 1938) - A nightclub dancer (Joan Crawford) marries into society and has to contend with her jealous sister-in-law (Sullavan).
TCM Airings: 18

Three Comrades (MGM, 1938) - The close friendship of three German soldiers (Robert Taylor, Franchot Tone, Robert Young) is strengthened by their shared love of the same woman (Sullavan, in her only Oscar-nominated performance), who's dying of tuberculosis.
TCM Airings: 44

The Shop Around the Corner (MGM, 1940) - Two employees in the same gift shop (Sullavan, James Stewart) can barely stand each other, not realizing they're falling in love through the mail as anonymous pen pals.
TCM Airings: 104

So Ends Our Night (United Artists, 1941) - Three German refugees in World War II (Frederic March, Sullavan, Glenn Ford) are always in hiding, always in fear of deportation.
TCM Airings: 0

Back Street (Universal, 1941) - Five years after meeting and falling in love with a banker (Charles Boyer), a willful shopgirl (Sullavan) is willing to become his mistress after she learns he's gotten married and had a son.
TCM Airings: 9

Appointment for Love (Universal, 1941) - A charming man (Charles Boyer) woos a female physician (Sullavan), and impulsively, they get married. The honeymoon ends quickly when she announces her very progressive views on marriage, including the idea they should have separate apartments. He tries to make his wife jealous in order to lure her into his bedroom.
TCM Airings: 0 

 

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2 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

The Good Fairy (Universal, 1935) - A naive girl (Sullavan) just out of a cloistered orphanage finds that being a "good fairy" to strangers can make life complicated.
TCM Airings: 1

Next Time We Love (Universal, 1936) -  The relationship of a young married couple (Sullavan, James Stewart) becomes strained when he gets an overseas assignment as a foreign correspondent, and she becomes a major stage star.
TCM Airings: 0

Both of these are quite good and turn up occasionally on YouTube. It would be nice if TCM aired them.

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Alan Bates

Much-honored British actor with whom I'm not terribly familiar. I'm leaving out most of his best-known films, including his only Oscar nomination for The Fixer. I'm including a couple of filmed stage plays, which used to be released theatrically occasionally back in the day, and the likes of which TCM will show once in a blue moon. I suppose these are all initially UK releases. I believe some years ago I referred to Far from the Madding Crowd as an American film, because MGM financed it, and boy, somebody on here let me have it in no uncertain terms that I must be really stupid to say such a thing. So, whatever. Looks like Madding Crowd is the only film on the list below I've actually seen. It appears he was in a number of projects with involved and challenging scenarios, and as you can see below, TCM has aired almost none of them.

I've largely tried to avoid repeats, but I believe there are now four films I've used on more than one of my fantasy SUTS lists. They are:

Ben-Hur (silent version) (Mary Pickford and Dorothy Gish, both of whom were extras in the chariot-racing scene)
The Last Days of Pompeii (Ward Bond and Louis Calhern)
Whistle Down the Wind (Hayley Mills and Alan Bates)
Gentlemen Don't Eat Poets (John Mills and Alan Bates)

Okay, here we go:

Whistle Down the Wind (Dist. in the US by Pathe-America, 1961) - When an injured wife murderer (Bates) takes refuge on a remote Lancashire farm, the three children (Hayley Mills, Diane Holgate, Alan Barnes) of the owner (Bernard Lee) mistake him for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ.
TCM Airings: 0

The Guest (Dist. in the US by Janus, 1963) - While renovating his house in London, a man (Robert Shaw) out of pity lodges a homeless man (Donald Pleasence), but his brother (Bates) taunts and harasses the cranky old bum.
TCM Airings: 0

Far from the Madding Crowd (MGM, 1967) - A willful, flirtatious young woman (Julie Christie) suddenly and unexpectedly inherits a large farm and is romantically pursued by three very different men (Bates, Peter Finch, Terrence Stamp).
TCM Airings: 37

Three Sisters (Dist. in the US by American Film Theatre, 1970) - Three Russian sisters (Jeanne Watts, Joan Plowright, Louise Purnell) lead lonely and purposeless lives after the death of their father (Laurence Olivier) who commanded the local army post. The oldest tries to find satisfaction in teaching but secretly longs for a home and family. The middle sister, unhappy with her marriage to a timid schoolmaster (Derek Jacobi), falls hopelessly in love with a married colonel (Bates). The youngest works in the local telegraph office but longs for a hedonistic existence. Their sense of the futility of it all increases when their brother (Kennth MacKintosh) marries a coarse peasant girl (Sheila Reid). She gradually encroaches on the family home until even the private refuge of the sisters is destroyed. They seek to start a new life in Moscow, but find  it hard to escape the practicalities of their quiet existence. When the army post is withdrawn from the town, they find some hope and begin to seek new purpose in life. Olivier, in a smaller role, is also the co-director.
TCM Airings:  0

A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (Dist. in the US by Columbia, 1972) - A couple (Bates, Janet Suzman) uses extremely black comedy as a survival technique , taking care of a daughter (Elizabeth Robillard) who's nearly completely brain dead. They take turns doing their daughter's voice and stare directly at death and emotional trauma, using humor to hide the pain.
TCM Airings: 0

In Celebration (Dist. in the US by American Film Theatre, 1975) - In a Yorkshire mining town, three educated brothers (Bates, Brian Cox, James Bolam) return to their blue-collar home to celebrate the 40th wedding anniversary of their parents (Gabrielle Daye, Bill Owen), but dark secrets come to the fore.
TCM Airings: 0

Nijinksy (Dist. in the US by Paramount, 1980) - A look at the real-life young and brilliant but headstrong dancer and aspiring coreographer (George De La Pena) at the Ballet Russes in the years just before World War I. The company's famous manager, Diaghilev (Bates), is a controlling and fiercely possessive impresario. Their powerful egos, exacerbated by homosexual desire and jealousy, increase the tension between them. A triangle forms when a young ballerina (Leslie Browne) determinedly attempts to draw the increasingly mentally unstable Nijinksy away from Diaghilev.
TCM Airings: 0

The Return of the Soldier (Dist. in the US by European Classics, 1982) - A haughty society queen with a tunnel-vision view of life (Julie Christie) has her complacency rocked when her husband, a captain (Bates) , returns home from the front lines in  World War I, shell-shocked and suffering from amnesia, not knowing who she is and determined to reunite with a working-class lover from his past (Glenda Jackson). She employs a psychiatrist (Ian Holm) to help him unscramble his feelings for the women in his life, including an inappropriately attentive cousin (Ann-Margaret) but ultimately comes to realize the man she knew is unreachable, as dead as the past for which he pines.
TCM Airings:  0

We Think the World of You (Dist. in the US by Cinecom, 1988) - An aimless young man (Gary Oldman) is sent to prison. He entrusts the care of his beloved dog to his former lover and best friend (Bates). When he gets out, he faces difficulties at home and may have to give up his dog.
TCM Airings: 0

Secret Friends (Dist. in the US by Briarpatch, 1991) - During a train ride, an anxiety attack leads a  middle-age illustrator (Bates) into an identity crisis. As his marital problems blend into his fantasy life with prostitutes, a long-dormant "secret friend" of his childhood (Gina Bellman) surfaces in his delusions.
TCM Airings: 0

Gentlemen Don't Eat Poets (Dist. in the US by Live Entertainment, 1995) - A nobleman (Bates) is more interested in reconstructing dinosaur bones than paying attention to his wife (Theresa Russell). He's not thrilled when his daughter (Lena Headey) brings home her fiancee (Steven Mackintosh), who aspires to be a poet. The new butler (Sting) provides the lady of the manor with the attention she's been missing, then seduces the daughter's fiancee. Is he responsible for his disappearance as well?
TCM Airings: 0

Evelyn (Dist. in the US by United Artists, 2002) - In 1953, a man (Pierce Brosnan) is devastated when his wife (Mairead Devlin) abandons their family on the day after Christmas. His unemployment and the lack of a woman's help to care for the three children (Sophie Vavasseur, Niall Beagan, Hugh McDonagh) lead the authorities to declare it an untenable situation. The Irish courts put the children into church-run orphanages. Although a sympathetic judge (Garrett Keogh) assures the man he can have his children back again once he gets a job, he learns that there's another barrier. The daughter suffers abuse, and the man goes to court to get his children back. He has a support team in the form of a barmaid (Juliana Marguiles), her brother (Stephen Rea), her suitor (Aiden Quinn) and a drunken soccer player (Bates).
TCM Airings: 0

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3 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Alan Bates

I'd love to see an Alan Bates day.  There are a few other Bates movies that (I'm pretty sure )TCM has shown: The Shout (1978), The Running Man (1963) The Entertainer (1960), A Kind of Loving (1962),  King of Hearts (1966), An Unmarried Woman (1978)

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Harold Lloyd

The first I ever heard of him was in a few articles or documentaries on the silent era, and he would always be mentioned third after Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton, but there would always be someone in those pieces saying he was the best or he was their favorite. I skipped past the 120 or so shorts he made between 1913 and 1921, which I'm sure those of you more knowledgeable than me will consider criminal (sorry!), and am limiting myself to his features, a few of which branch over into the sound era. A lot of these features are between 60-95 minutes, so TCM could certainly pad out this lineup with some shorts instead of more Backlot/Wine Club ads. It's kind of amusing that Harold's characters are pretty much always named "Harold" and then some other last name, and then other characters, especially in the silents, don't even have "Christian" names, just descriptions. Some of that might stem from the fact that there was no formal script for a lot of these movies, just as assemblage of sketched-out scenarios. I think Movie Crazy is the only one of these I've actually seen (though of course I've seen clips from Safety Last!). My gosh, TCM has aired every one of these movies, even all those Paramounts, so I think this lineup is feasible.

This is my third lineup in which I've included the silent version of Ben-Hur, which has become something of a running gag with me. I've never read about how this came about elsewhere, but imdb seems pretty sure a number of big-time stars were used as extras for the crowd at the chariot-racing scene, including Lloyd, Mary Pickford and Dorothy Gish. My guess is there was a lot of advanced word-of-mouth about what a spectacle this was going to be, and the stars who showed up genially agreed to appear as extras as long as they were there. It probably gave them a better view. I guess every time I notice a celebrity I'm doing an imaginary SUTS day for was allegedly in it, I'll probably include it. But I'm pretty sure TCM wouldn't actually show Ben-Hur as part of a Lloyd SUTS day. I don't think ...

A Sailor-Made Man (Associated Exhibitors, 1921) - An idle, wealthy playboy (Lloyd) foolishly joins the Navy when the father (Noah Young) of the girl he wants to marry (Mildred Davis) tells him to get a job and prove himself worthy.
TCM Airings: 7

Grandma's Boy (Associated Exhibitors, 1922) - A meek young man (Lloyd) must find the courage within when a rogue tramp (Charles Stevenson) menaces his hometown.
TCM Airings: 10

Dr. Jack (Associated Exhibitors, 1922) - A country doctor (Lloyd) is called in to treat a young woman (Mildred Davis), whose chronic condition has made a doctor (John Prince) and his sanitarium very wealthy, despite years of unsuccessful treatment. His old-fashioned methods do the trick, and the quack is sent packing.
TCM Airings: 6

Safety Last! (Pathe, 1923) - A young man (Lloyd) leaves his small town for the big city to look for a job. As soon as he makes it big, he plans to send for his sweetheart (Mildred Davis) to marry him and join him. His enthusiasm to get ahead leads him to some interesting adventures.
TCM Airings: 25

Hot Water (Pathe, 1924) - An episodic look at married life and in-law problems. The adventures include a ride on a crowded trolley with a live turkey, a wild spin in an auto with the in-laws (Josephine Crowell, Charles Stevenson, Mickey McBan) in tow and a sequence in which the husband (Lloyd) accidentally chloroforms his mother-in-law and believes he's killed her. When she begins sleepwalking, he believes she's come back from the dead to haunt him.
TCM Airings: 12

The Freshman (Pathe, 1925) - A nerdy college student (Lloyd) will do anything to become popular on campus.
TCM Airings: 20

Ben-Hur: a Tale of the Christ (MGM, 1925) - A Jewish prince (Ramon Navarro) seeks revenge on a childhood friend (Francis X. Bushman) after he's wrongly imprisoned and his family disappears, while the events of the Gospels are going on around him. Lloyd is apparently an extra in the crowd during the chariot racing scene. 
TCM Airings: 32

For Heaven's Sake (Paramount, 1926) - An irresponsible young millionaire (Lloyd) changes his tune when he falls the daughter (Jobyna Ralston) of a downtown minister (Noah Young). 
TCM Airings: 9

Welcome, Danger (Paramount, 1929) - A botany student (Lloyd) is called back to San Francisco, where his late father had been the police chief, to help investigate a crime wave in Chinatown.
TCM Airings: 11

Feet First (Paramount, 1930) - An ambitious shoe salesman (Lloyd) meets a young woman (Barbara Kent), not knowing she's the daughter of his boss (Robert McWade) and passes himself off as a leather tycoon, then has to try to hide the truth.
TCM Airings: 8

Movie Crazy (Paramount, 1932) - After a mix-up with an application photograph, an aspiring actor (Lloyd) is invited to a screen test and goes off to Hollywood.
TCM Airings: 21

The Cat's-Paw (Fox Film Corp., 1934) - A naive missionary brought up in China (Lloyd) returns to America to seek a wife. Corrupt politicians enlist him to run for mayor as a dummy candidate they believe has no chance of winning.
TCM Airings: 16

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17 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Harold Lloyd

The first I ever heard of him was in a few articles or documentaries on the silent era, and he would always be mentioned third after Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton, but there would always be someone in those pieces saying he was the best or he was their favorite. I skipped past the 120 or so shorts he made between 1913 and 1921, which I'm sure those of you more knowledgeable than me will consider criminal (sorry!), and am limiting myself to his features, a few of which branch over into the sound era. A lot of these features are between 60-95 minutes, so TCM could certainly pad out this lineup with some shorts instead of more Backlot/Wine Club ads. It's kind of amusing that Harold's characters are pretty much always named "Harold" and then some other last name, and then other characters, especially in the silents, don't even have "Christian" names, just descriptions. Some of that might stem from the fact that there was no formal script for a lot of these movies, just as assemblage of sketched-out scenarios. I think Movie Crazy is the only one of these I've actually seen (though of course I've seen clips from Safety Last!). My gosh, TCM has aired every one of these movies, even all those Paramounts, so I think this lineup is feasible.

This is my third lineup in which I've included the silent version of Ben-Hur, which has become something of a running gag with me. I've never read about how this came about elsewhere, but imdb seems pretty sure a number of big-time stars were used as extras for the crowd at the chariot-racing scene, including Lloyd, Mary Pickford and Dorothy Gish. My guess is there was a lot of advanced word-of-mouth about what a spectacle this was going to be, and the stars who showed up genially agreed to appear as extras as long as they were there. It probably gave them a better view. I guess every time I notice a celebrity I'm doing an imaginary SUTS day for was allegedly in it, I'll probably include it. But I'm pretty sure TCM wouldn't actually show Ben-Hur as part of a Lloyd SUTS day. I don't think ...

A Sailor-Made Man (Associated Exhibitors, 1921) - An idle, wealthy playboy (Lloyd) foolishly joins the Navy when the father (Noah Young) of the girl he wants to marry (Mildred Davis) tells him to get a job and prove himself worthy.
TCM Airings: 7

Grandma's Boy (Associated Exhibitors, 1922) - A meek young man (Lloyd) must find the courage within when a rogue tramp (Charles Stevenson) menaces his hometown.
TCM Airings: 10

Dr. Jack (Associated Exhibitors, 1922) - A country doctor (Lloyd) is called in to treat a young woman (Mildred Davis), whose chronic condition has made a doctor (John Prince) and his sanitarium very wealthy, despite years of unsuccessful treatment. His old-fashioned methods do the trick, and the quack is sent packing.
TCM Airings: 6

Safety Last! (Pathe, 1923) - A young man (Lloyd) leaves his small town for the big city to look for a job. As soon as he makes it big, he plans to send for his sweetheart (Mildred Davis) to marry him and join him. His enthusiasm to get ahead leads him to some interesting adventures.
TCM Airings: 25

Hot Water (Pathe, 1924) - An episodic look at married life and in-law problems. The adventures include a ride on a crowded trolley with a live turkey, a wild spin in an auto with the in-laws (Josephine Crowell, Charles Stevenson, Mickey McBan) in tow and a sequence in which the husband (Lloyd) accidentally chloroforms his mother-in-law and believes he's killed her. When she begins sleepwalking, he believes she's come back from the dead to haunt him.
TCM Airings: 12

The Freshman (Pathe, 1925) - A nerdy college student (Lloyd) will do anything to become popular on campus.
TCM Airings: 20

Ben-Hur: a Tale of the Christ (MGM, 1925) - A Jewish prince (Ramon Navarro) seeks revenge on a childhood friend (Francis X. Bushman) after he's wrongly imprisoned and his family disappears, while the events of the Gospels are going on around him. Lloyd is apparently an extra in the crowd during the chariot racing scene. 
TCM Airings: 32

For Heaven's Sake (Paramount, 1926) - An irresponsible young millionaire (Lloyd) changes his tune when he falls the daughter (Jobyna Ralston) of a downtown minister (Noah Young). 
TCM Airings: 9

Welcome, Danger (Paramount, 1929) - A botany student (Lloyd) is called back to San Francisco, where his late father had been the police chief, to help investigate a crime wave in Chinatown.
TCM Airings: 11

Feet First (Paramount, 1930) - An ambitious shoe salesman (Lloyd) meets a young woman (Barbara Kent), not knowing she's the daughter of his boss (Robert McWade) and passes himself off as a leather tycoon, then has to try to hide the truth.
TCM Airings: 8

Movie Crazy (Paramount, 1932) - After a mix-up with an application photograph, an aspiring actor (Lloyd) is invited to a screen test and goes off to Hollywood.
TCM Airings: 21

The Cat's-Paw (Fox Film Corp., 1934) - A naive missionary brought up in China (Lloyd) returns to America to seek a wife. Corrupt politicians enlist him to run for mayor as a dummy candidate they believe has no chance of winning.
TCM Airings: 16

LLOYD SAVED HIS MONEY AND HAD A HUGE MANSION

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John Gilbert

Boy, this is a guy I really don't know anything about. I'm not sure I've ever seen one of his movies all the way through. He is the classic male example of not transiting well to the sound era, although he made 10 sound films (I'm only including his first). IMDB says Garbo left him at the altar and then tried to revive his career by insisting he get the male lead in Queen Christina. "It didn't work out, but the attempt was beautiful," I think some woman says in one of those TCM pieces about Garbo and Gilbert. Dead of a heart attack just shy of 39. Ugh. Anyway, I'm going pretty obscure. I only selected two MGM films (one of which must not be available), only one pairing with Garbo and only one talkie. Many of the early silents have no plot descriptions, but I couldn't find any info that any of them are lost, so I included them.

The Sin  Ye Do (Triangle Distributing, 1916) - No plot description. Gilbert is seventh-billed.
TCM Airings: 0

The Corner (Triangle Distributing, 1916) - No plot description. Gilbert is an extra.
TCM Airings: 0

The Dark Road (Triangle Distributing, 1917) - An English army officer (Jack Livingston) who comes from a very old and prominent family marries a ravishingly beautiful but unscrupulous woman (Dorothy Dalton) who has no qualms about using her sexual allure go get the luxuries she wants that her husband can't provide. When he's sent off to war, she begins a series of affairs, one of which results in her becoming the love slave of a German spy (Robert McKim) - the very spy her husband has been assigned to track down. I don't know anything about Gilbert's role, but he's fourth-billed.
TCM Airings: 0

Shackled (W.W. Hodkinson, 1918) - No plot description. Gilbert is third-billed.
TCM Airings: 0

Doing Their Bit (Fox Film Corp., 1918) -  Two girls (Jane and Katherine Lee) are sent to live with their wealthy American uncle (Franklyn Hannah) after their father (Gilbert) loses his life on a World War I battlefield. Accidentally locked inside his munitions plant one night, the girls see their cousin (Alexander Hall) letting two men (Eddie Sturgis, R.R. Neill) into the factory. The girls recognize the two spies they'd seen on the boat to America sending signals to a German submarine. The spies knock out their cousin, but the children lock them in a die-stamping machine until help arrives. A man (Jay Strong) who loves their female cousin (Beth Ivins) enlists, as does a man (William Pollard) whose wealthy mother (Kate Lester) plots to falsify his birth records but is foiled by the children.
TCM Airings: 0

For a Woman's Honor (Robertson-Cole Distributing Corp., 1919) - No plot description. Gilbert is third-billed.
TCM Airings: 0

The White Circle (Paramount, 1920) - No plot description. Gilbert is fourth-billed.
TCM Airings: 0

Honor First (Fox Film Corp., 1922) - No plot description. Gilbert is top-billed.
TCM Airings: 0

A California Romance (Fox Film Corp., 1922) - In California in the 1800s, a man (Gilbert) and a woman (Estelle Taylor) are in love but are torn by politics - he believes Caifornia should become part of the US, while she believes it should remain a part of Mexico. Convinced that he's a coward and a traitor, she becomes engaged to an officer in the Mexican army (George Siegmann). However, the officer has a dark secret she doesn't know about that will not only threaten his relationship with her but also place all of California in jeopardy.
TCM Airings: 0

A Man's Mate (Fox Film Corp., 1924) - An artist (Gilbert) suffers amnesia from a blow to the head received while two Apaches fight over a sultry dancer in a cafe (Renee Adoree). He becomes an Apache himself, falls in love with the dancer and paints her portrait - his masterpiece. She learns his true identity and restores him to his family, realizing she'll lose him. Surgery restores his memory, but some unconscious force guides him back to the cafe and her love.
TCM Airings: 0

Flesh and the Devil (MGM, 1926) - Childhood friends (Gilbert, Lars Henson) are torn apart when one of them marries the one the other fiercely loved (Greta Garbo).
TCM Airings: 23

His Glorious Night (MGM, 1929) - In a European kingdom, a princess (Catherine Dale Owen) is set to have a state wedding arranged by her mother, the queen (Nance O'Neil), but she's in love with the captain of the horse guards (Gilbert). She's forced to break off the affair, but the captain seeks vengeance and reveals himself to be a notorious swindler, threatening to publicize the affair and ruin her. To avoid scandal, the queen agrees to his price - letting the princess spend a night alone with him in his apartment.
TCM Airings: 0 (!) (Despite being an MGM film. Not sure what's going on there)

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5 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

His Glorious Night (MGM, 1929) - In a European kingdom, a princess (Catherine Dale Owen) is set to have a state wedding arranged by her mother, the queen (Nance O'Neil), but she's in love with the captain of the horse guards (Gilbert). She's forced to break off the affair, but the captain seeks vengeance and reveals himself to be a notorious swindler, threatening to publicize the affair and ruin her. To avoid scandal, the queen agrees to his price - letting the princess spend a night alone with him in his apartment.

 

TCM Airings: 0 (!) (Despite being an MGM film. Not sure what's going on there)

1) Rights issues. It's based on a Ferenc Molnár play, and MGM sold the remake rights to Paramount for 1960 's A Breath of Scandal. 2) The only known surviving print is held by The Library of Congress. The good news is that this has been shown at some festivals, and those who have seen it say the stories about Gilbert's voice are nonsense. I don't know what TCM's legal department would have to do to authorize a screening of this movie, but I wish they would.

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Victor McLaglen

Boy, his real life was like one of the characters he played in movies. Born in England to Scottish parents, he ran away to fight in the Boer Wars, but his father, who'd once been a bishop in South Africa, secured his release. He traveled to Canada, where he worked as a farm laborer and then a professional prizefighter. As a member of various vaudeville and Wild West shows, he would challenge all comers to boxing matches (!), which enabled him to travel all over the US, Australia (where he worked for time as a gold prospector) and South Africa. He was the first man to fight Jack Johnson after he became heavyweight champion of the world in 1909, though it was an exhibition match, and no winner was declared. But he hung with him for six rounds without getting knocked out. He joined the Irish Fusiliers and served in the Middle East. For a time, he was the head of the military police in Baghdad. His first thought after World War I ended was to get back into boxing, but he ended up acting in a British silent film, and work began coming steadily. Some of his earliest films were written by Alfred  Hitchcock, before he began his directing career. After three or four years, he was then offered the lead in a Hollywood film and spent most of the rest of his life in the US, where he quickly became friends with John Ford and appeared in any number of his films, including the lead role in The Informer, for which he won the Best Actor Oscar (not to take anything away from his performance, but it didn't hurt that there were three nominees from Mutiny on the Bounty who, no doubt, had the vote split between them). Ford continued to use him throughout the '40s and '50s in such films as She Wore a Yellow Ribbon and The Quiet Man, the latter of which got him another Oscar nomination, this time in the supporting category. Although McLaglen formed a motorcycle and polo club that took on the trappings of military organization, his imdb biographer insists all assumptions that he was some sort of paramilitary extreme right-winger are erroneous. He died a month shy of his 73d birthday, not long after appearing in Sea Fury, a film directed by his son, Andrew McLaglen.

Continuing my contrarian streak I've left out almost all of his most famous films, including his two Oscar-nominated roles, and picked 12 movies of his I haven't seen. I'm unsure how many of his silent films are actually available. There are no plot descriptions for a number of them. This is definitely not a TCM-friendly lineup: 10 of these films have never aired, and the other two only once each!

The Prey of the Dragon (Stoll Picture Productions, 1921) - In Australia, a drunkard (Harvey Braban) hires a gang to kill the husband (Hal Martin) of his ex-fiancee (Gladys Jennings). McLaglen is fourth-billed. I think it's pretty safe to assume he plays a member of the gang.
TCM Airings: 0

Woman to Woman (Dist. in the US by Lewis J. Selznick Enterprises, 1923) - Spoiler alert! (This is pretty much the whole film) - A man (Clive Brook) has to leave his expecting French girlfriend, a dancer at the Moulin Rogue (Betty Compson), to fight in World War I, where he loses his memory. Building a new life in London, he gets married. The dancer, now a mother, thinks he's dead. She becomes famous under a new name but falls gravely ill. One night, the man is in the audience of the show and watching her perform restores his memory. Learning he's alive, she entrusts her son (Tom Coventry) to the care of the man and his wife (Josephine Earle), then goes to perform at a party, where she dies from a combination of exhaustion and a broken heart. I just had to pick this one when I saw McLaglen was credited as - I kid you not - "Nubian Slave"! (I assume in one of the dance numbers, since I don't see where such a character would otherwise figure into the plot).
TCM Airings: 0 

The Passionate Adventure (Dist. in the US by Lewis J. Selznick Enterprises, 1924) - A rich man (Clive Brook) leaves his wife (Marjorie Daw), poses as a petty criminal and saves a factory girl (Alice Joyce) from a crook (McLaglen).
TCM Airings: 0

Men of Steel (Warner Bros., 1926) - No plot description. McLaglen is fourth-billed.
TCM Airings:  0

Mother Machree (Fox Film Corp., 1927) - A poor Irish immigrant to America (Belle Bennett) finds work in a carnival and is able to send her son (Phillipe de Lacy) to a fine school. When her true social standing is discovered, the school expels her son. She feels compelled to allow the school principal and his wife to adopt her son. She becomes a housemaid and raises the daughter (Joyce Wirard as a child, Constance Howard as an adult) of her employer, who grows up to fall in love with her son (Neil Hamilton as an adult). Apparently, only four of seven reels of this film survive. I don't know if any of it appears on the Ford at Fox box set. McLaglen it appears plays the giant in the carnival. John Wayne has his first role any larger than being an extra, but I don't know who he plays.
TCM Airings: 0

Hot for Paris (Fox Film Corp., 1929) - No plot description. McLaglen is top-billed, and Raoul Walsh directed.
TCM Airings: 0

Not Exactly Gentlemen (Fox Film Corp., 1931) - No plot description. McLaglen is top-billed, and Fay Wray is also in it.
TCM Airings: 0

Hot Pepper (Fox Film Corp., 1933) - A pair of ex-marines (Edmund Lowe, McLaglen) pool their resources and open a nightclub. Trouble begins when they both fall in love with a woman (Lupe Velez) and begin fighting over her. This one was so racy, it apparently almost singlehandedly brought on the much stricter enforcement of the Hayes Code, says imdb. 
TCM Airings: 1 (It was during a Velez SUTS day August, 2018)

Under Two Flags (United Artists, 1936) - A sergeant (Ronald Colman) comes to the French Foreign Legion after taking the blame for a crime committed by his brother. A woman (Claudette Colbert) falls in love with him, even though the company major (McLaglen) is in love with her. The major sends him only on the most dangerous assignments, hoping to get rid of him. He ends up falling in love with a lady visitor to the garrison (Rosalind Russell).
TCM Airings: 0

Ex-Champ (Universal, 1939) - A former prizefighter (McLaglen) tries to help his son (Tom Brown) pay off his gambling debts.
TCM Airings: 0

Roger Touhy, Gangster (20th Century Fox, 1944) - No plot description. McLaglen is second-billed.
TCM Airings: 0

Prince Valiant (20th Century Fox, 1954) - A young Viking prince (Robert Wagner) tries to become a knight in the court of King Arthur (Brian Aherne) and restore his exiled father (Donald Crisp) to his rightful throne. Looks like McLaglen plays the Viking responsible for the exile of Val's father.
TCM Airings: 1
 

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7 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Under Two Flags (United Artists, 1936) - A sergeant (Ronald Colman) comes to the French Foreign Legion after taking the blame for a crime committed by his brother. A woman ( Claudette Colbert) falls in love with him, even though the company major (McLaglen) is in love with her. The major sends him only on the most dangerous assignments, hoping to get rid of him. He ends up falling in love with a lady visitor to the garrison (Rosalind Russell).
TCM Airings: 0

Roger Touhy, Gangster (20th Century Fox, 1944) - No plot description. McLaglen is second-billed.
TCM Airings: 0

I watched those two online in the past couple of years. I liked the latter film. I watched it for Anthony Quinn, who has a small supporting role.

Here's a thread on the film from 2010 :

https://forums.tcm.com/topic/32809-roger-touhygangster1944/?tab=comments#comment-605927

 

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Boris Karloff 

He always struck me as very genteel and dignified. I think he could have had almost any kind of career he wanted, but like Vincent Price, he chose to mostly embrace horror and gothic suspense (and at an earlier career point) as well. I'm uncertain if he had Indian heritage. His father was some sort of customs commissioner in opium (you know, back when that was an item you could legally trade and collect customs on), and imdb says he pre-set his funeral arrangements to be "respectful of his Indian roots and in true Hindu fashion". But his parents had very Anglo names, as did he - he was born William Henry Pratt. I'm not exactly sure where he got this kind of Germanic/Russian/Hungarian-type name from. He was trained to be a diplomat, but he moved to Canada from England at the age of 22 and joined a theater company, eventually ending up in Hollywood, where he got involved with the fledgling silent film industry (I'm including three of his silents). This didn't even fully pay the bills - he also had to work as a truck driver - but his career really took off after James Whale cast him as the monster in Frankenstein

I tried to encompass his entire career while leaving out the ones I've seen most frequently on TCM. I didn't include The Body Snatcher, though I will mention it here, because it's a personal favorite and maybe his performance most worthy of an Oscar nomination, in my opinion. He's also quite strong as a doomed, fanatic soldier in John Ford's The Lost Patrol. I also liked when he poked fun at his own image. When he turns up in Lured, no doubt the audiences of the day were meant to think, "Oh, here's the serial killer Lucille Ball is looking for". Instead, he turns out to indeed be nuts, but in a more comedic kind of way. He worked at every major studio, but he also had a six-picture contract at tiny Monogram. Three of them were to make Mr. Wong movies, an attempt, it appears, to capitalize on the success of the Chan and Moto franchises (I'm including one of them), and then he worked some at AIP in the '60s (where Price also worked). He did three Mexican horror movies that weren't released until after his death (I would assume Nipkow has probably seen these). I'm including one of them. The Black Cat is the only one of these films I'm absolutely sure I've seen, though I get deja vu reading the plot description of The Ape, so maybe I've seen that one, too.

The Infidel (Warner Bros., 1922) - No plot description. Karloff is fourth-billed.
TCM Airings: 0

Never the Twain Shall Meet (MGM, 1925) - No plot description. Karloff is an extra. Lionel Barrymore is also in it. There's a sound remake from 1931 with Leslie Howard also from MGM, but TCM doesn't appear to have ever shown the silent version.
TCM Airings: 0

Let It Rain (Paramount, 1927) - A Marine sergeant and the ringleader for his side aboard ship in the eternal conflict between the Marines and the Navy (Douglas MacLean) falls in love with a telephone operator (Shirley Mason) and escapes the brig when his enemy for her affections (Wade Boteler) is about to take shore leave. Together, they break apart a mail robbery scheme, and he wins his commission and the girl. Karloff plays one of the crooks.
TCM Airings: 0

The Fatal Warning (Mascot Pictures, 1929) - When a bank executive (George Periolat) disappears, he's accused of stealing a large fortune from the bank, but his daughter (Helene Costello) and her criminologist friend (Ralph Graves) set out to find him and clear his name. I don't know anything about Karloff's role. He's fifth-billed.
TCM Airings: 0

Cracked Nuts (RKO, 1931) - To impress the aunt (Edna May Oliver) of his fiancee (Dorothy Lee), a young man (Bert Wheeler) tries to become monarch in a small kingdom, but the people have already crowned another man (Robert Woolsey), who got the position by wining at gambling. So, he plans a coup d'etat. He plants a bomb, but something goes wrong. Karloff plays a revolutionary, whose name is also Boris.
TCM Airings: 8

Business and Pleasure (Fox Film Corp., 1932) - On a Mediterranean cruise, a manufacturer of razor blades (Will Rogers) is the target of a femme fatale (Jenna Goudal) in the employee of a business rival (Joel McCrea), and he becomes embroiled in a feud between two Arab tribes. An uncredited Karloff is the sheik of one of the tribes.
TCM Airings: 0

The Black Cat (Universal, 1934) - American honeymooners in Hungary (David Manners, Julie Bishop) become trapped in the home of a Satan-worshiping priest (Karloff) when the bride is taken there for medical help following a car accident.
TCM Airings: 15

Mr. Wong, Detective (Monogram, 1938) - When a chemical manufacturer (Grant Withers) is killed after asking Detective Wong (Karloff) to help him, Wong investigates his murder and two more that follow. He uncovers a spy ring trying to steal the formula for a poison gas developed by the first victim's company.
TCM Airings: 8 (TCM hasn't aired it in 18 years, movies with white people playing Asian detectives not as popular as they once were)

The Ape (Monogram, 1940) - A mad but kindly scientist (Karloff) seeks a cure for young woman afflicted with polio (Maris Wrixon). He needs spinal fluid from a human to complete the formula for his experimental serum. Meanwhile, a vicious circus ape has broken out of its cage and is terrorizing the townspeople.
TCM Airings: 5

Tap Roots (Universal, 1948) - In the 1860s, the Dabneys, owners of a Mississippi plantation, experience tragedy and turmoil when they refuse to join either side in the American Civil War. The Confederate fiancee (Whitfield Connor) of the granddaughter (Susan Hayward) of the plantation patriarch (Russell Simpson) wants to punish the citizens of the neutral area by staging a raid, but she attempts to thwart the attack with the help of her grandfather's Choctaw friend (Karloff).
TCM Airings: 0

The Raven (AIP, 1963) - A magician who's been turned into a raven (Jack Nicholson) turns to a former sorcerer (Vincent Price) for help. Karloff plays the sorcerer who cast the transforming spell. Karloff is also in a 1935 Universal version with Bela Lugosi that I assume might be a little closer to the Edgar Allen Poe poem.
TCM Airings: 4

House of Evil (Dist. in the US by Columbia, 1968) - Relatives of a recently deceased man meet at his eerie castle for a reading of the will. They encounter a sinister pianist (Karloff), who turns out to be a toy maker, and his toys are imbued with murderous intentions.
TCM Airings: 0

 

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Edward Gargan - 24 hours of the best films they have where he played a patrol officer in.  If not enough to fill the time, or wanting to divide the time, then move on to the best films he has played a detective in.  Every time I see him, I think of this idea.

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Vincent Price

I'm from the generation that pretty much only knew Vincent Price as the guy who did the "Thriller" rap. Then I had to watch a couple of those AIP Poe adaptations (inaccurate as they usually were) in high school English classes and got some greater awareness of what kind of movies he'd been in. There was re-release of House of Wax during a brief 3-D revival in the late '80s (Jaws 3-D, Friday the 13th 3-D, etc.) that I went to go see as well. I noted he was in a non-horror role in Whales of August, which I didn't go see, because it seemed like way too much of a chick flick for my sensibilities at the time. Then he had a poignant cameo in Edward Scissorhands, and then he was gone. So, I was too young and callow to have much of an appreciation of him while he was still with us, but I've tried to make up for it since becoming a TCM regular. Interestingly, he was typecast early on as historical figures, gigolos and "The Guy Who Doesn't Get the Girl", but he made the most he could out of those kinds of parts during a six-year contract with 20th Century Fox, during which he was a supporting player in a number of their A-list productions (Laura, Leave Her to Heaven). Heck, he's about the only reason I'd ever consider watching Song of Bernadette again. He'd been in a Universal horror pic early in his career (The Invisible Man Returns) and fought hard to win the male lead opposite Gene Tierney in Dragonwyck, whose gothic horror is a precursor to many of his '60s AIP roles. It has often been noted on TCM that it was his role in House of Wax that really heralded his move to horror for the remainder of his career, although looking at his imdb resume, I can see that move didn't happen overnight. He was still showing up in costume dramas like The Ten Commandments for a number of years. I picked only five horror films out the 12 listed below, because I wanted to highlight that he was perfectly fine outside of that genre. He did a lot of voice work for animation, and I thought that should be represented as well, so I also included one oddball example from that genre. As usual, I looked for films with which I was mostly unfamiliar. I've only seen three of these: The Keys of the KingdomThe Fly and The Masque of the Red Death.

I think I've done at least three dozen of these spotlights now, and I've tried to avoid repetition of selections, but that's getting harder. I believe I've now selected five films more than once. They are:

Ben-Hur (the silent version) (Mary Pickford, Dorothy Gish, Harold Lloyd and John Gilbert were all extras in the chariot-racing scene)
The Last Days of Pompeii (Ward Bond and Louis Calhern)
Whistle Down the Wind (Haley Mills and Alan Bates)
Gentlemen Don't Eat Poets (John Mills and Alan Bates)
Adventures of Captain Fabian (Agnes Moorehead and Vincent Price)

And now finally to my Price SUTS day selections:

The Invisible Man Returns (Universal, 1940) - The owner of a coal mining operation (Price), wrongfully imprisoned for murdering his brother, takes a drug to make him invisible, despite of its side-effect: gradual madness.
TCM Airings: 0

The Keys of the Kingdom (20th Century Fox, 1944) - A young priest (Gregory Peck) is sent to China to start a Catholic parish among the non-Christian Chinese. While his boyhood friend (Price), also a priest, flourishes at his post in a more Christian part of the world, he struggles with his calling. He encounters isolation, disease, poverty and a variety of setbacks which humble him but also make him more determined than ever to succeed. Over a span of many years, he gains a large following among the Chinese through his quiet understanding, devotion and patience.
TCM Airings: 6

Dragonwyck (20th Century Fox, 1946) - A simple Connecticut farm girl (Gene Tierney) is recruited by a distant relative, a landholder and descendant of Dutch aristocrats (Price), to be governess to his young daughter (Connie Marshall) in his Hudson Valley mansion.
TCM Airings: 6

Bagdad (Universal, 1949) - An English-educated Bedouin princess (Maureen O'Hara) returns to Bagdad to find her father murdered, a corrupt pasha (Price) ruling in his stead and various factions warring for control of the caliphate.
TCM Airings: 1 (it was during SUTS in 2007, probably on O'Hara's day - there was one for her that year)

Adventures of Captain Fabian (Dist. in the US by Republic, 1951) - A sea captain (Errol Flynn) becomes involved with a servant girl (Micheline Presle) in the early days of New Orleans. She sees him as a way to gain access to wealthy households. Price plays a "spineless dandy" says one imdb reviewer.
TCM Airings: 0

While the City Sleeps (RKO, 1956) - A serial killer (John Barrymore, Jr.) has been murdering beautiful women in New York City, and the new owner of a media company (Price) offers a high-ranking job to the first of his senior executives who can get the earliest scoops on the case.
TCM Airings: 51

The Fly (20th Century Fox, 1958) - A scientist (David Hedison) has a horrible accident when he tries to use his newly invented teleportation device. Price plays the scientist's brother.
TCM Airings: 13

Queen of the Nile (Dist. in the US by Colorama, 1961) - Chronicles of the rise and fall of the woman who eventually became known as Nefertiti (Jeanne Crain). Price plays her father, a priest who wants to marry her to the new pharaoh (Amedo Nazzari). Besides Crain and Price, the whole cast is Italian.
TCM Airings: 0

Convicts 4 (Allied Artists, 1962) - Based loosely on the real life of John Resko. After his death sentence is commuted to life in prison, a man (Ben Gazzara) is transferred from Sing Sing to Dannemora, where, with the help of sympathetic prison guard (Stuart Whitman), he becomes a rehabilitated man and a successful painter. Price is one of several celebrity cameos in the film with no more than three minutes of screen time as an art critic who agrees to come take a look at Gazzara's work.
TCM Airings: 9

The Masque of the Red Death (AIP, 1964) - A European prince (Price) terrorizes the peasantry while using his castle as a refuge against the "Red Death" plague that stalks the land.
TCM Airings: 7

Scream and Scream Again (Dist. in the US by AIP, 1970) - A serial killer who drain his victims' blood is on the loose in London. The police follow him to a house owned by an eccentric scientist (Price).
TCM Airings: 1 (During the month of Halloween in 2016 - it was Christopher Lee as SOTM, and he has a supporting role in this movie)

I Go Pogo (Euremco International, 1980) - Pogo the Possum (Skip Hinnant) runs for president with the help of his animal friends. Price plays Deacon Mushrat. This film was never released theatrically in the US (it apparently was in some other countries) but did appear on HBO and Cinemax and in various home video releases - Disney had control of it for a while.
TCM Airings: 0  

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Richard Conte - his 14 Noirs 


The Brothers Rico
New York Confidential
The Big Combo
Highway Dragnet
The Blue Gardenia
The Raging Tide
The Sleeping City
Whirlpool
Thieves' Highway
House of Strangers
Cry of the City
Call Northside 777
Somewhere in the Night
The Spider

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11 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Richard Conte - his 14 Noirs 


The Brothers Rico
New York Confidential
The Big Combo
Highway Dragnet
The Blue Gardenia
The Raging Tide
The Sleeping City
Whirlpool
Thieves' Highway
House of Strangers
Cry of the City
Call Northside 777
Somewhere in the Night
The Spider

The above list is why I wish TCM would show more Universal or United Artist films;   I.e. all of the films above I have NOT seen are from those studios.  

Yea,,,,  I know I need to find other sources for films from studios TCM doesn't feature much as well a "B" pictures.

 

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Robert Ryan

Ernest Borgnine tells an anecdote in TCM's Robert Ryan salute that airs sometimes between films about sharing a trailer with him on one of the movies they worked together on - they were in at least three movies toghether. Borgnine set up his wardrobe and departed. Then Ryan came in, unaware of the setup, and dumped all of Borgnine's clothes on the ground outside the trailer! Borgnine said, "Gee, Bob, I think we're supposed to share this trailer", and after Ryan understood the situation "he couldn't have been nicer!" Which is supposed to be heartwarming, I guess, but I always thought Ryan was a jerk for dumping those clothes in the first place without even trying to find out why they were there!

Anyway, he played a lot of interesting roles, from honorable men to psychotics. He didn't shy away from playing a murderous anti-Semite (giving him his only Oscar nomination) or a JFK assassination conspirator, even though in real life he was largely a pacifist, civil rights activist and opposed to nuclear proliferation. I didn't know he'd been a Marine drill sergeant and a military boxing champion. Looks like he had a run where was under exclusive contract to RKO for about eight years, so no doubt a lot of stuff has aired on TCM, but he worked all over.  Once again, I picked mostly films I haven't seen. I'm leaving out Crossfire. Among these, I've only seen Berlin ExpressOn Dangerous Ground and About Mrs. Leslie.

Golden Gloves (Paramount, 1940) - An up and coming honest boxer (Richard Denning) runs afoul of the head of a group of racketeers (J. Carrol Naish) by insisting on fighting fair. They set out to ruin him, but with the support of his girlfriend (Jeanne Cagney) and a newspaperman (Robert Paige), the pugilist stands up to the Mob. In his film debut, Ryan is seventh-billed, but I don't know anything about his part. He's probably either a boxing opponent or one of the racketeers.
TCM Airings: 0

Behind the Rising Sun (RKO, 1943) - In Japan just before the start of World War II, foreigners and their Japanese friends are caught up in the rising tide of Japanese militarism. Directed by Edward Dmytryk.  Ryan plays an American prizefighter in Japan.
TCM Airings: 15

Trail Street (RKO, 1947) - Bat Masterson (Randolph Scott) is approached by an old friend (Ryan) who convinces him to become the marshal of Liberal, Kansas, and help the residents fight drought and a destructive range war.
TCM Airings: 17

Berlin Express (RKO, 1948) - Just after World War II, a multinational group of train passengers become involved in an assassination plot hatched by surviving Nazis. Ryan is the hero who finds out about the murder plot.
TCM Airings: 32

Best of the Badmen (RKO, 1951) - The outlaws of the Clanton and Younger gangs are the heroes of this fictionalized biography. Ryan plays Jeff Clanton.
TCM Airings: 15

On Dangerous Ground (RKO, 1951) - A rough city cop (Ryan) is disciplined by his captain (Ward Bond) and sent upstate to a small, snowy town to help the local sheriff (Charles Kemper) solve a murder case. Some scenes were directed by the female lead, Ida Lupino, when Nicolas Ray was absent.
TCM Airings: 37

About Mrs. Leslie (Paramount, 1954) - A rooming house landlady (Shirley Booth) recalls her past in flashbacks. Ryan plays a mysterious man of wealth and influence.
TCM Airings: 3

The Tall Men (20th Century Fox, 1955) - Two brothers discharged from the Confederate Army (Clark Gable, Cameron Mitchell) join a businessman (Ryan) for a cattle drive from Texas to Montana and run into raiding anti-slavery guerrillas, angry Sioux, rough terrain and bad weather.
TCM Airings: 0

Ice Palace (Warner Bros., 1960) -   After World War I, two men (Richard Burton, Ryan) start a cannery business in Alaska, but eventually they drift apart. One becomes an unscrupulous businessman, while the other gets involved in Alaskan politics.
TCM Airings: 0

The Crooked Road (Seven Arts, 1965) - An American journalist (Ryan) plans to expose as a crook the dictator of a small Balkan state (Stewart Granger) but finds himself framed for murder.
TCM Airings: 1

A Minute to Pray, a Second to Die (Dist. in the US by ABC, 1968) - In Tuscosa, New Mexico, the governor (Ryan) offers amnesty papers to all outlaws, but the appearance of gunfighter (Alex Cord) triggers a violent confrontation between him, the local marshal (Arthur Kennedy) and other outlaws. A spaghetti Western filmed in Spain.
TCM Airings: 0

The Love Machine (Columbia, 1971) - An ambitious TV newscaster (John Phillip Law) has an affair with the wife (Dyan Cannon) of a network executive (Ryan) to get a promotion.
TCM Airings: 0

 

 

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