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COVID-19 quarantine reactions/ coping......


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7 hours ago, mr6666 said:

-so Who HERE has gotten a shot?

& how'd it happen?

any reactions?

:unsure:

Was lucky to get mine early on, first on December 23 and the 2nd dose, January 22.  the Moderna had no reactions what so ever..  Have the CDC Vaccination Record Card.

 

Like to add received both Shingrix  in 2020 as well, the first only gave me a slight sore arm.

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15 hours ago, hamradio said:

Was lucky to get mine early on, first on December 23 and the 2nd dose, January 22.  the Moderna had no reactions what so ever..  Have the CDC Vaccination Record Card.

 

Like to add received both Shingrix  in 2020 as well, the first only gave me a slight sore arm.

how was appt. arranged?

thru doctor/med. group, gov. site, pharmacy site, employer or OTHER???

:unsure:

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18 minutes ago, mr6666 said:

how was appt. arranged?

thru doctor/med. group, gov. site, pharmacy site, employer or OTHER???

:unsure:

The building where I work partially deals with healthcare, will only say my employer asked do I want it, said yes.

Won't go any further because of the personal anonymity on the board.

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On 2/26/2021 at 7:23 PM, mr6666 said:

-so Who HERE has gotten a shot?

& how'd it happen?

any reactions?

:unsure:

My wife and I both got ours -Pfizer.  No reactions, other than arm sore at vaccination site for a few days.  Both in the over 70 group and got through regional hospital.

Have a friend who got his - Moderna - through VA.  No reactions.

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How Inequity Gets Built Into America’s Vaccination System

People eligible for the coronavirus vaccine tell us they are running up against barriers that are designed into the very systems meant to serve those most at risk of dying of the disease.....

"......In many regions of the U.S., it’s much more difficult to schedule a vaccine appointment if you do not have access to the internet. In some areas, drive-through vaccinations are the only option, excluding those who do not have cars or someone who can give them a ride. In other places, people who do not speak English are having trouble getting information from government hotlines and websites. One state is even flat-out refusing to allow undocumented workers with high-risk jobs to get prioritized for vaccination.

The vaccine supply is too low to inoculate everyone who is eligible, and competition for appointments is fierce.

“My nightmare scenario is that we have this two-tiered health system where there are people who are wealthy, privileged or connected, and then there's everybody else,” Dr. Jonathan Jackson,.......

https://www.propublica.org/article/how-inequity-gets-built-into-americas-vaccination-system

:unsure:

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I'm finding that most people whom I know have been vaccinated, many with both doses. Appointments seem to be more and more available. For those who want to be vaccinated, it has become much easier, at least in my part of the world.

I have one old friend who is not planning to be vaccinated. He's afraid of "long-term effects." I said to him, Even if there were a remote possibility of having a long-term effect, you're 71 years old, how much long term is left? In the meantime, Covid can kill you.

 

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we needed THIS in Illinois...........

Chicago Vaccine Hunters-

"COVID-19 vaccines are an important & precious resource, and unfortunately, many doses are thrown away every day. In this group, we will collect & share information about places where people of any age can get vaccinated without restrictions and *not* at someone else's expense........

see:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/1864372350383607

:unsure:

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22 minutes ago, Swithin said:

I'm finding that most people whom I know have been vaccinated, many with both doses. Appointments seem to be more and more available. For those who want to be vaccinated, it has become much easier, at least in my part of the world.

I have one old friend who is not planning to be vaccinated. He's afraid of "long-term effects." I said to him, Even if there were a remote possibility of having a long-term effect, you're 71 years old, how much long term is left? In the meantime, Covid can kill you.

 

If you look at Texas' standing w.r.t. vaccinations compared to the other states, we're either last or next to last in percentage of people vaccinated so far.

The waiting list in my suburban county north of Dallas currently has over 270,000 people on it, and the list has been closed to new entries since 8 February.  The county's population is just about 1.1 million people.

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5 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

If you look at Texas' standing w.r.t. vaccinations compared to the other states, we're either last or next to last in percentage of people vaccinated so far.

The waiting list in my suburban county north of Dallas currently has over 270,000 people on it, and the list has been closed to new entries since 8 February.  The county's population is just about 1.1 million people.

That's unfortunate. I had been waiting to hear from my medical center. I was receiving texts from them, basically saying, "Don't call us, we'll call you, when you're eligible and when we have enough vaccine." When they lowered the eligibility age to 65, my doctor said don't wait for the hospital. He told me to get on the Javits (NY State) site and keep trying. So after a few tries, I was able to get an appointment in mid-January, and, on the day of dose one, a date for the second shot in early February.

A few weeks ago, I finally got an "invitation" to book my vaccine at my medical center! I didn't need to at that point, but could have gotten any time during the last two weeks. Just checked -- they have numerous appointments available for every day this week.

I don't understand why there is this uneven distribution in the country. Whatever his emerging flaws, our Governor has been terrific, in the Covid arena.

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1 hour ago, mr6666 said:

:(

I have relatives and friends in Texas and all I can say is YIKES!.  Would it have killed the gov to give it another month??? At least my younger sister is vaccinated. She is only 55, but she works for local government and cannot work remotely. 

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10 minutes ago, Swithin said:

That's unfortunate. I had been waiting to hear from my medical center. I was receiving texts from them, basically saying, "Don't call us, we'll call you, when you're eligible and when we have enough vaccine." When they lowered the eligibility age to 65, my doctor said don't wait for the hospital. He told me to get on the Javits (NY State) site and keep trying. So after a few tries, I was able to get an appointment in mid-January, and, on the day of dose one, a date for the second shot in early February.

A few weeks ago, I finally got an "invitation" to book my vaccine at my medical center! I didn't need to at that point, but could have gotten any time during the last two weeks. Just checked -- they have numerous appointments available for every day this week.

I don't understand why there is this uneven distribution in the country. Whatever his emerging flaws, our Governor has been terrific, in the Covid arena.

My older brother who is 67 and lives 80 miles away in Oklahoma received his second dose two weeks ago through the state health department.  I'm in the lowest priority group for adults.  My younger brother, who is 52 and lives in Texas, wants to travel to Europe this spring (a trip he postposed from last summer) and needs his vaccinations to do so.  He's planning to travel to northern Oklahoma to get a shot from our tribal government, which is a 5 hour trip one way.

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7 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

My older brother who is 67 and lives 80 miles away in Oklahoma received his second dose two weeks ago through the state health department.  I'm in the lowest priority group for adults.  My younger brother, who is 52 and lives in Texas, wants to travel to Europe this spring (a trip he postposed from last summer) and needs his vaccinations to do so.  He's planning to travel to northern Oklahoma to get a shot from our tribal government, which is a 5 hour trip one way.

Well, I'm sorry you can't get your vaccination just yet, but I'm jealous because you have Mama's Daughters' Diner, where I had a great meal, the day after Christmas one year, when I spent Christmas with friends in Dallas.

 

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Pace of U.S. Vaccinations vs. the World

".........Israel has administered about four times as many doses per 100 people than the U.S., and the United Arab Emirates and the United Kingdom have also administered significantly more doses per capita than the U.S., according to Our World in Data.

Speaking at an event on Feb. 25 commemorating the 50 millionth COVID-19 vaccine shot, Biden noted that the U.S. is ahead of schedule to deliver on his promise of administering 100 million vaccine doses in his first 100 days in office.

As we have written, the U.S. was already virtually at the pace Biden set as his goal — 1 million shots per day — before he took any action as president. It has risen since then. The seven-day average daily number of people vaccinated was 1.4 million on Feb. 24, 47% higher than on Jan. 20, when Biden was inaugurated, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s COVID Data Tracker. According to preliminary numbers from the CDC, the U.S. had administered more than 78 million vaccine doses by March 1, with more than 57 million of them coming since Biden took office. ............

Israel leads the world, with 94.9 doses per 100 people as of March 1. Second is the UAE at 60.9 doses per 100 people, and the United Kingdom is third at 31.1 doses per 100 people.

By this measure, the U.S. ranks fourth at 23.2 doses per 100 people. This represents people who have gotten at least one dose of vaccine. .........

https://www.factcheck.org/2021/03/pace-of-u-s-vaccinations-vs-the-world/?platform=hootsuite

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One Long John Silver's in Kentucky will only have drive through take out only until this is over.  Won't even open the indoor carryout.  Not dealing with the mask issue, some people says it's their constitutional right not to wear one so the manager has the same right not to open.

What's good for the goose...

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15 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

If you look at Texas' standing w.r.t. vaccinations compared to the other states, we're either last or next to last in percentage of people vaccinated so far.

The waiting list in my suburban county north of Dallas currently has over 270,000 people on it, and the list has been closed to new entries since 8 February.  The county's population is just about 1.1 million people.

S.C. ranks 29th in one report and another shows 7.8% have received both shots.  Governor has moved teachers and school employees to eligible now category, along with over 65.

One aspect of reporting is where does VA fit in.  I have friends who got their shots at VA facility.  Does that count in the state totals since vaccine supposedly sent to states?

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Just now, ElCid said:

S.C. ranks 29th in one report and another shows 7.8% have received both shots.  Governor has moved teachers and school employees to eligible now category, along with over 65.

One aspect of reporting is where does VA fit in.  I have friends who got their shots at VA facility.  Does that count in the state totals since vaccine supposedly sent to states?

The NY Times' dashboard comes from CDC data.  Here's their attempt to clarify the numbers:

The C.D.C. notes that total doses administered are based on the location where the vaccine was given, and that in limited cases, people might get a vaccine outside of their place of residency. As of Feb. 23, the C.D.C. reports the number of people receiving one or more doses based on where individuals reside.

On Feb. 19, the C.D.C. began including shots given by the federal agencies in each state’s count. Doses delivered to federal agencies were added to state totals on Feb. 20. Some states, including Alaska, North Dakota and Utah, are supposed to receive supplements for tribal governments that have elected to receive their vaccines through the state, rather than through the federal Indian Health Service.

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

The NY Times' dashboard comes from CDC data.  Here's their attempt to clarify the numbers:

The C.D.C. notes that total doses administered are based on the location where the vaccine was given, and that in limited cases, people might get a vaccine outside of their place of residency. As of Feb. 23, the C.D.C. reports the number of people receiving one or more doses based on where individuals reside.

On Feb. 19, the C.D.C. began including shots given by the federal agencies in each state’s count. Doses delivered to federal agencies were added to state totals on Feb. 20. Some states, including Alaska, North Dakota and Utah, are supposed to receive supplements for tribal governments that have elected to receive their vaccines through the state, rather than through the federal Indian Health Service.

CA state officials tried to have it both ways:   E.g.  claiming the Feds are 100% responsible for those under Federal jurisdiction:  E.g.  tribal lands,  asylum seekers or illegal immigrants in Fed custody,  Federal prisons (which I agree with the state on),     but included those given shots as part of the statewide totals for number of shots given.  

 

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