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And Introducing. . . .


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10 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

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Jennifer Jones had appeared in three previous films under the name Phyllis Isley before becoming Jennifer Jones in The Song of Bernadette (1943).

Good example of how a producer would introduce an actor they have signed under an exclusive contract.   

I believe Hal Wallis did something similar for Liz Scott in her first film You Came Along.

 

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15 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

Every once in a while the credit ...And Introducing - is something of a misnomer. The actor in question has already been in films but the powers want to make it seem like they've discovered a new talent.

 

Case in point... Peter O'Toole - who had already been in several films.

Can you name others?

Yes, just saw one last night. Isabella Rossellini was given an introducing credit for White Nights in 1985, but she had had a small role as a nun with a few lines in Vincente Minnelli's final film A Matter or Time (which starred her mother, Ingrid Bergman) 9 years earlier.

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15 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

Every once in a while the credit ...And Introducing - is something of a misnomer. The actor in question has already been in films but the powers want to make it seem like they've discovered a new talent.

 

Case in point... Peter O'Toole - who had already been in several films.

Can you name others?

Also Hayley Mills had already had a critical hit with Tiger Bay before being given the introducing credit on Pollyanna.

Then there was also the sarcastic use of it on 2001's Ocean's Eleven remake where Julia Roberts got it at the height of her stardom.

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15 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

Every once in a while the credit ...And Introducing - is something of a misnomer. The actor in question has already been in films but the powers want to make it seem like they've discovered a new talent.

 

Case in point... Peter O'Toole - who had already been in several films.

Can you name others?

What was the film O'Toole was "introduced" in?       

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36 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Lawrence of Arabia

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Thanks.    I assumed it was Lawrence but wasn't sure it wasn't The Day They Robbed The Bank of England since he had a leading role in that film (unlike the two films before).

The Day They Robbed,  was released in the USA (distributed by MGM) but didn't do very well and O'Toole was on the stage in London for the 18 or so months between the two films (thus he wasn't very well known in the USA).

 

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7 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Honestly, if Fontaine’s name wasn’t listed there, I don’t know that I would have recognized her. In her 40s-50s films she bears more of a resemblance to sister Olivia, but not in this photo. 

I think she looks adorable in this picture  --  better than she did later.  That blonde bob is slightly reminiscent of early Bette Davis.

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It's been an eye-opener to see who got the Introducing credit.  Though some of those mentioned weren't on the same level of stardom as Maureen O'Hara, or Peter O'Toole and the like, they still mostly had successful careers and are somewhat remembered, at least by old film fans.  But I don't know if my impression is still correct or not, and I guess it's almost impossible to find out.  As others have noted, Introducing credits for actors who fizzle aren't remembered.  So there might be dozens of them to each success story.  But I can see how I might get the impression that the Introducing credit was a gateway to nowhere no matter whether it really was or not.  For well-known stars I'd not pay close attention to their credits, because I'd know they were in the movie--probably being the reason I was watching.  And since they each had only one, I may not have even seen it.  But  my eye skimming over the credits for other actors, Introducing credits would stand out.   And associating that with unknown actors would make me form the opinion that actors that got that credit didn't have successful careers.

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23 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Sepiatone if you are saying that the Introducing credit wasn't until the end of the movie, you are incorrect as far as 2 examples I gave. Warren Beatty for Splendor In The Grass was in the beginning of the credits and so was Shirley MacLaine's credit for The Trouble with Harry., ( if that's what you meant) ?

Blue...  I was only pointing out(with some levity) that KANE is an example of when the "introducing" credits are given at the END of the movie. There may have been others that also did that, but I don't know which they are.  

And JAMES?

I can't make "my" winks bigger because they WEREN'T "my" winks, but the one the site provides.  If there's a way to increase their sizes I'm unaware of it.

Sepiatone

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Sepia, we seem to be missing each others points on this one. did you read the post I made about Michael Caine who had been in 46 combined ( tv and film) productions, he began his career in 1946. He wasn't a new face in films when he had the Introducing credit in Zulu, that film was in 1964!

At any rate, lets call a truce, hopefully in some other thread we'll be agreeing again :)

 

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Consider me "truceful"  ;) 

Caine's film career(far as I can get info on) began in 1950, which IS way before ZULU,  so him getting "introduced" in it is a puzzle.  Of course, most of those earlier roles were uncredited and very small "bit" roles at that, so ZULU, possibly his largest role at that point, and being a more prominent role too, may have been the reason for the "introducing" tag.   Many at the time might have recognized him, but only as a character actor from earlier work.

Sepiatone

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Caine looks like yet  another British actor that while he made films prior to his "introduction" they were only released in Britain,  or had very limited releases in the USA.

So I view this type of "introduction" as introducing the actor to the American audience (the most lucrative market for English language films) . 

For the British release of Zulu maybe the "introduce" wasn't even there  (it wasn't uncommon to have minor differences in film versions for US versus British releases).    

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On 3/25/2020 at 10:29 PM, yanceycravat said:

Every once in a while the credit ...And Introducing - is something of a misnomer. The actor in question has already been in films but the powers want to make it seem like they've discovered a new talent.

I think it is also done to "justify" why someone unknown to the viewing public is given a lead role. Like when they jump from 9th billed in their previous film where they were playing hatcheck girl or busboy but now are suddenly promoted by the studio/producer as a lead. So they are being introduced as a new star. It's not necessarily them being introduced in their first film.

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11 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I think it is also done to "justify" why someone unknown to the viewing public is given a lead role. Like when they jump from 9th billed in their previous film where they were playing hatcheck girl or busboy but now are suddenly promoted by the studio/producer as a lead. So they are being introduced as a new star. It's not necessarily them being introduced in their first film.

You make a good point. I remember a number of years ago the agent of a friend of mine was trying to get  a "and introducing" credit for her on a TV show. The scenario was very much like how you described. Alas the producers said no because she had appeared on TV before.

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6 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

You make a good point. I remember a number of years ago the agent of a friend of mine was trying get her a "and introducing" credit for her on a TV show. The scenario was very much like how you described. Alas the producers said no because she had appeared on TV before.

Of course you don't want this type of special credit on a TV show nobody watches or a movie nobody's ever going to see!

This morning I am watching a little known European film called FOREIGN INTRIGUE (1956) starring Robert Mitchum. The opening credits have not one but two 'Introducing' mentions-- for French actress Genevieve Page and Swedish actress Ingrid Thulin (whose name is spelled Tulean). Obviously they were being introduced to American audiences in this production.

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13 hours ago, Dommy said:

I didn't mean to post it twice, sorry.  Introducing Madeline Kahn.  It was one year ago you did that tribute to her.

These non-studio-era "and introducing" of an actor sometimes confused me because I don't know the history of WHY this would be done.

As noted above, in the studio era,  with actors under long term contracts,    the 'introducing" would be used by either the studio or producer that had the actor under contract  to promote either foreign talent to American audiences or American talent that was newly signed by the studio.     I.e. the WHY was that there was a gain by those that owned the contract rights in promoting their talent.

Was Kahn under contract with producer \ director Peter Bogdanovich and that is WHY he promoted her?      Kahn's next film was also a Bogdanovich release Paper Moon.    So maybe he had her under a two film contract or he was already planning on casting Kahn in his next film (Paper Moon),  and with that in mind decided to give her that additional credit.

 

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