Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
TomJH

Have Your Pets Responded To Movies?

Recommended Posts

19 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

I don't know if I believe that animals are color blind.

You have to understand how your eye sees color to best comprehend it. "Color-Blind" is a blanketing term without much meaning like "a Good Singer".

Each color emits waves your eyes "see" and send the message to your brain. Everyone "sees" colors differently, a professional colorist, pigment designer, art designer....they're all going to have acute color perception. Most everyone falls in the "regular" tier,  while others simply do not perceive certain wavelengths. Their brain confuses two colors because the waves are similar.  Their world looks like kind of this:

Catskill+Roadhouse.sm.jpg

Anyone with a wave color "blindness" generally compensates with tint/contrast.  Color blind does not mean seeing in black & white like an old movie.

A dog would be attracted to the movement of the big white blob and big black blob of the horses in the Great Train Robbery sequence shown above. The eye also reacts to the smoke not for the color, but the fact it's a big moving blob in a busy field of trees/leaves. Contrast is compensation for color.

groupingdog.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m not an expert on parrots’ vision but I would presume that my green cheek can see in color as he has color-coded toys where the owner can actively teach his or her bird to “grab a blue ring” (e.g). My bird on the other hand, grabs any ring and throws it on the ground, but I think teaching colors to the bird is the main objective of the toy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

You have to understand how your eye sees color to best comprehend it. "Color-Blind" is a blanketing term without much meaning like "a Good Singer".

Each color emits waves your eyes "see" and send the message to your brain. Everyone "sees" colors differently, a professional colorist, pigment designer, art designer....they're all going to have acute color perception. Most everyone falls in the "regular" tier,  while others simply do not perceive certain wavelengths. Their brain confuses two colors because the waves are similar.  Their world looks like kind of this:

Catskill+Roadhouse.sm.jpg

Anyone with a wave color "blindness" generally compensates with tint/contrast.  Color blind does not mean seeing in black & white like an old movie.

A dog would be attracted to the movement of the big white blob and big black blob of the horses in the Great Train Robbery sequence shown above. The eye also reacts to the smoke not for the color, but the fact it's a big moving blob in a busy field of trees/leaves. Contrast is compensation for color.

groupingdog.jpg

That's not a very happy world for dogs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

That's not a very happy world for dogs.

We think dogs see colors in a limited palette like the painting above of the houses, but with heightened contrast of blacks/whites of a Greg Toland photographed film. Dogs don't need to see prey hiding in the bushes-they smell it first. A dog needs to identify location by seeing large areas of light or dark moving.

I honestly believe that's what transfixes moviegoers to Fred Astaire and all those great movie dancers, especially in black/white/gray. I've sat in a roomful of people mesmerized by Fred & Ginger and thought about why we like looking at others dance. Or horses running in a field with manes & tails flowing. It's primitive. 

And for all the ribbing Natalie Kalmus receives for being film color consultant, as a colorist myself, I can "read" all of her incredible choices. I think much of her talent (or control really) comes across rather subliminally for most viewers. One of the things I dislike about many modern movies is the tiresome "black & blue" cast of every frame. I notice it, it's my job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...