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Fastest guns in the West

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Knowing fans on here also like Westerns, do you have any of the top fastest gunfights in history that come to mind?

But in reality historians insist it didn't happen like say in SHANE, ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST & others & that gunfighters would rather somewhat hide in the streets then have an all out battle , standing in a face off   Closest all say was of course THE OK CORRAL & WILD BILL HICKOCK once killed a man in pretty much a street gunfight

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The caveat with the historical records is that in the early years of a lot of the Wild West boom towns there were no newspapers, so no records. For instance everybody's heard of Dodge City, Wichita, Virginia City, and Tombstone,  but has anybody heard of  this place....

Fort Benton, Montana was established in 1846 by Alexander Culbertson, who worked for Auguste Chouteau and Pierre Chouteau, Jr. of St. Louis,  it was the last fur trading post on the Upper Missouri River. For 30 years, the port attracted steamboats carrying goods, merchants, gold miners and settlers, coming from New Orleans, Memphis, St. Louis, Hannibal, Bismarck, Kansas City, etc. 

As the Head of Steamboat navigation and terminus for the 642-mile-long Mullan Road, completed by the United States Army in 1860,  it was part of the overland link between trade on the Missouri and the Columbia River, at Fort Walla Walla, Washington. Twenty thousand migrants used the road in the first year to travel to the Northwest. It became an important route for miners from both directions going into the interior of Idaho, and north to Canada.  Steamboat travel  from St. Louis, Missouri helped broadly fuel the development of the American West between 1860 and 1890, when it was supplanted by railroad transport. 

Fort Benton's first newspaper, the Benton Record, was established February 1, 1875 so there was no record for the roughly the first wildest thirty years of its existence. 

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I too, have read articles and other statements dismissing the accuracy  of gunfights in the old West.  And several gun experts(whom I can't name or validate the accuracy of their claims)  who state the sidearms used by men in those times were accurate when careful aim and steady bracing was used when shooting.  But, to draw them quickly out of their holsters and firing them equally quick at a target 15-20 yards or more away?  Well, they claim. the "kick" of the pistol when fired when only held by one hand would send the bullet way off course.  They'd more likely kill an innocent bystander several yards to the side or a horse standing at a hitching post.  According to any of this information, the most accurate enactment of an old west gunfight is in the movie GOIN' SOUTH, which has a gunfight in which John Belushi is shooting at and being shot at by opponents just a couple or so arm lengths away and nobody getting hit!  :D 

Sepiatone

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53 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I too, have read articles and other statements dismissing the accuracy  of gunfights in the old West.  And several gun experts(whom I can't name or validate the accuracy of their claims)  who state the sidearms used by men in those times were accurate when careful aim and steady bracing was used when shooting.  But, to draw them quickly out of their holsters and firing them equally quick at a target 15-20 yards or more away?  Well, they claim. the "kick" of the pistol when fired when only held by one hand would send the bullet way off course.  They'd more likely kill an innocent bystander several yards to the side or a horse standing at a hitching post.  According to any of this information, the most accurate enactment of an old west gunfight is in the movie GOIN' SOUTH, which has a gunfight in which John Belushi is shooting at and being shot at by opponents just a couple or so arm lengths away and nobody getting hit!  :D 

Sepiatone

I saw some historical program many years ago that said what your're saying above;    The accuracy of a 6 shooter,  especially if fired with one hand and no steady bracing was very limited;    25 feet or so.      I'm watching Gunsmoke on ME-TV which started with episode #1 just last week.      In this very first one, a really fast gunman kills a guy in town and then a sheriff from out of town that tries to arrest him.     Matt also gets shot by a gunman but lives.     After Matt recovers and is going after the gunman,  Doc says he is crazy;  the guy is just too fast.      But Matt figures out that when he killed those other two he told them to come closer to him and they did (within 15 feet or so),  and when he shot Matt he was around 20 feet away.     Matt faces off against the gunman and again the gunman baits Matt by saying "come closer":   Matt says NO,  stay where you are (about 25 feet away),  and says that if you attempt to come any closer I'm shooting since I now know your "game";   you're a poor shot at distance.     The gunman draws and does get off the first shot but it misses Matt and Matt shoots the gunman dead.         I yelled at the T.V.:     good going Matt,  you used your brains!!!

 

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Here is a guy demonstrating fast draw and fanning a revolver, don't let the scary clown throw you off the real scary one is in the White House.

 

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Interesting conversation between Little Bill Daggett and W.W. Beauchamp in "Unforgiven" (1992)

Little Bill Daggett.......Look son, being a good shot, being quick with a pistol, that don't do no harm, but it don't mean much next to being cool-headed. A man who will keep his head and not get rattled under fire, like as not, he'll kill ya.

W.W. Beauchamp.......But if the other fella is quicker, and fires first...

Little Bill Daggett ....Then he'll be hurrying, and he'll miss. Look here...

[stands and draws his gun] 

Little Bill Daggett........That's about as fast as I can draw, and aim, and hit anything more than ten feet away... 'less it's a barn.

W.W. Beauchamp.......But if he doesn't miss?

Little Bill Daggett.........Then he'll kill ya.

Little Bill Daggett.........Yeah, that's why there's so few dangerous men around like old Bob, like me. It ain't so easy to shoot a man anyhow, especially if the son-of-a-***** is shootin' back at you. I mean, that'll just flat rattle some folks.

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mel brooks never told frankie laine Blazing Saddles was a comedy so he would sing it serious.

:)

 

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The "fastest"?  Well, here's one way to find out.  ;)

Sepiatone

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On 4/5/2020 at 8:28 AM, cigarjoe said:

The caveat with the historical records is that in the early years of a lot of the Wild West boom towns there were no newspapers, so no records. For instance everybody's heard of Dodge City, Wichita, Virginia City, and Tombstone,  but has anybody heard of  this place....

Fort Benton, Montana was established in 1846 by Alexander Culbertson, who worked for Auguste Chouteau and Pierre Chouteau, Jr. of St. Louis,  it was the last fur trading post on the Upper Missouri River. For 30 years, the port attracted steamboats carrying goods, merchants, gold miners and settlers, coming from New Orleans, Memphis, St. Louis, Hannibal, Bismarck, Kansas City, etc. 

As the Head of Steamboat navigation and terminus for the 642-mile-long Mullan Road, completed by the United States Army in 1860,  it was part of the overland link between trade on the Missouri and the Columbia River, at Fort Walla Walla, Washington. Twenty thousand migrants used the road in the first year to travel to the Northwest. It became an important route for miners from both directions going into the interior of Idaho, and north to Canada.  Steamboat travel  from St. Louis, Missouri helped broadly fuel the development of the American West between 1860 and 1890, when it was supplanted by railroad transport. 

Fort Benton's first newspaper, the Benton Record, was established February 1, 1875 so there was no record for the roughly the first wildest thirty years of its existence. 

good info

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Fastest ever saw is still Gene Hackman in the 1995 Quick  and the Dead ($19m.) (**1/2)

Close runner would have to be Harmonica in Once Upon a time in the West

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On 4/5/2020 at 7:17 PM, EricJ said:

 

 

funny as usual

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Historians say Hickock was the closest to the real deal though

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5 minutes ago, spence said:

Historians say Hickock was the closest to the real deal though

Yea,  similar things were said about Ransom "Ranse" Stoddard.

 

 

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14 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yea,  similar things were said about Ransom "Ranse" Stoddard.

 

 

LIBERTY VALANCE huh

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Have a lamenated photo from an old Premiere magazine with Ford-(an illustration) that say s from THE MAN WHO SHOT THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE unquote

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3 hours ago, spence said:

LIBERTY VALANCE huh

In case you didn't get the connection to Wild Bill:

 

 

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