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Who Watched "Carrie?"


Hibi
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Carrie's revenge at then end doesn't teach anyone a lesson if they are dead. The *perfect* revenge would be like the scene in "Stand by Me". Larda_s Hogan's revenge can't be topped.

 

Oh yes I know its only a campfire story but its a neat idea. Wil Wheaton should have wrote the script for "Carrie". lol.

 

Hogan lived to reap the satifaction but Carrie did not. Her fruitcake mom needed a good man in her life!

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LOL. Yes, I meant the Jennifer Jones version that was shown last night (no, it wasnt bloody!) I hadnt seen it in years and overall thought it was excellent (it was different than the book in some respects) Wonderful Olivier performance and one of Jennifer's best too. I can see why it didnt do well. Too downbeat. I hope TCM can keep showing it. Deserves to be seen.

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> This is what happens when different movies has the same title!

 

I mentioned in another thread recently that TCM once showed *The World, the Flesh, and the Devil*, but that the DirecTV box guide claimed they were showing *Flesh and the Devil*. :)

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Wyler didn't think too highly of CARRIE after he'd finished it. He thought it a disappointment, and the film sat on the shelf for the better part of three years while he and Paramount thought about what they should do with it, and how it should be released.

 

I, frankly, think he was rather too hard on it; it's quite an interesting film. Though they'd worked together before on WUTHERING HEIGHTS, and Laurence Olivier had credited Wyler with finally opening his eyes to the possibilities that acting for film provided (to the extent that Oliver had asked Wyler to direct his adaptation of HENRY V in 1944), Wyler had a hard time convincing Olivier to play Hurstwood because the actor had, until then, resisted playing characters with American accents (though that resolve would soften further over time).

 

As for Jennifer Jones, I've never liked her. It's not that I don't think she was one of the better actresses of her day, it's just that there's always been something about her that annoys me, though I've never quite been able to put it into words. Maybe her manner has allways been a little too...precious for my taste.

 

It's also interesting that Wyler and his good friend and Liberty Films partner, George Stevens, were both filming Theodore Dreiser stories at Paramount at the same time (Stevens was. of course, making the author's "An American Tragedy" as A PLACE IN THE SUN).

 

One other unusual thing: in the late 1940s and early '50s, Paramount, and only Paramount, would occasionally include extra scenes from selected films when they played at Radio City Music Hall, and nowhere else: Wyler's THE HEIRESS and Tay Garnett's A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR'S COURT (which had a couple of extra songs) are two that appeared at the Music Hall in extended versions, with the films cut to the length with which we're all familiar for their general runs. The footage for these has never turned up -- but it has for CARRIE, and Paramount has included it as a supplement on the DVD (though I don't think they know, or really care,+ that it was for exclusive exhibition at Radio City).

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Olivier is outstanding, and walks away (literally and figuratively) with the film. His descent into oblivion is amazing to behold, and he handles the role perfectly. I enjoyed his performance immensely, the other performances less so. Jones is almost reduced to a supporting part.

 

In the novel, Carrie is clearly the most important character, and the reader's sympathies lie with her. We care about her, and where she is going, while George comes off as as somewhat unsavory.

 

David Raksin's scoring is reminiscent of Hugo Friedhofer's style.

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I tried to like ?Carrie?, but I just couldn?t. I?m very glad TCM aired it, and I might watch it again some day, but it didn?t entertain me. The only reason I kept watching it was because I kept hoping something interesting would happen in it.

 

It didn?t teach me anything. It didn?t resemble real life. And it was a downer all the way though. Too many people in it were unhappy most of the time. And the ending was a bummer.

 

Olivier?s character didn?t make much sense. He had been very rich and was supposed to have been an intelligent businessman, and the film gave the impression he was a self-made man, so why did he put everything he owned in his first wife?s name, and why didn?t he start some other type of business and become successful again? He must have been an idiot, while the obnoxious Eddie Albert was always successful and he never ran out of money.

 

I?m used to Olivier going away for a couple of years to claim his ?inheritance? from his father (the Emperor of China) and his mother (an Indian queen) and coming back to Wuthering Heights rich. He was more handsome than Eddie Albert, but much more stupid, and this didn?t make a lot of sense.

 

The film should have shown Carrie taking a little more time to decide to live with Albert in the first sequence. It should have shown her resisting him more, but realizing she was poor and alone and needed him. It should have shown her in some sort of ?transition? sequence finally deciding to live with him, and it should have shown her having at least some love for him in the beginning.

 

On the other hand, Wuthering Heights was filled with very interesting true-life real-human ?adult situations?, such as obsession over one woman (Heathcliff), and multiple personality disorder (Cathy), who oscillated between hating him and loving him. It was a ?tragedy? of a movie, but at least they got together in the end as ?ghosts? or ?phantoms?, which is a little hokey, but it gave us a bit of a ?happy ending?.

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Hibi - I watched this for the first time last night. I thought Olivier was great - sort of had an Irish accent. The movie did a good job of showing the class situation - poor vs. wealthy - in Chicago at that time. Jennifer Jones played *naive* Carrie very well - I kept saying to myself "Don't!" when the men told her "Trust Me" over and over. I saw that ending coming - "Don't leave the room!" When George fell, he fell hard and far. How about that Eddie Albert!? Slick as could be - one of the original traveling salesmen, I suppose.

 

I have the book around here, I will have to read it to compare.

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Well stated. It was a downer all the way thru! I read where there was a 7 minute fire sequence that was excised from the movie, but was included in the DVD.Not that I want to see that part of the movie, but I wonder how it fit into the story, No one should be amazed that this depressing pic was a box office and critical failure.

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Fire sequence? I thought the excised scene was the flophouse scene (which was included in the TCM print) Does anyone have the DVD? I'm wondering what scene this was that was cut and later included..........

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I read the book years ago. I cant remember a lot about it (maybe time for another look) I know it went into a lot more detail about Hurstwood's descent (I think I remember him being a trolley car driver at one point) and I think the ending was different. One thing I think could've been improved in the film was the editing (or the script). It's too sketchy in parts (like Hurstwood's marriage; that could've been fleshed out better in the beginning). Also, with no discernable talent, Carrie becomes an actress practically overnight! I guess a movie can only be so long. It's a long novel...................

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I watched it years ago, but I couldn't remember why I didn't like it

so I watched it again and it's the ending , Whatever gave Wyler

this penchant for unusual endings in this and The Heiress, but

it also gave us Olivier's best performance and Jennifer at her

lovliest....Miriam Hopkins was superb as the unforgiving wife

and Eddie Albert played the slick cad with gusto....

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I don't claim this is a great movie by any means, but it was worth watching. Dreiser's novels aren't exactly upbeat; try reading An American Tragedy sometime. Dreiser takes his time with his novels. He builds characters and we get interested in them. If you're looking for lots of stuff to happen, forget it. These are stories about everyday people just trying to get ahead in life.

 

Carrie comes from nowhere, lives with her sister and her rotten husband, then, very slowly, makes her way up to becoming a stage actress. George goes in the opposite direction. Such is life.

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I have read An American Tragedy. I think it's the better of the two novels. I think the movie of Carrie stays closer to the themes of the book then Stevens version (A Place In the Sun) does to American Tragedy (aside from changing the time period). The social problems are downplayed in Stevens remake. I've never seen the Syliva Sidney version from the 30s...........Not to knock A Place In the Sun. It's a great movie, but a different take on the story...........I agree. Dreiser did not write upbeat novels. Writing about social inequities was his thing...

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